105

I have a list of strings in my code;

A = ['a1', 'a2', 'a3' ...]
B = ['b1', 'b2', 'b3' ...]

and I want to print them separated by a linebreak, like this:

>a1
b1
>a2
b2
>a3
b3

I've tried:

print '>' + A + '/n' + B

But /n isn't recognized like a line break.

1
  • 1
    Use \n. That was the issue
    – Trooper Z
    Jul 6, 2018 at 17:41

9 Answers 9

254

You have your slash backwards, it should be "\n"

12
  • 12
    Backward slash = "\" , forward slash = "/". The OP has his slash forwards. Mar 1, 2016 at 17:51
  • 10
    @user3527975, I mean backwards in the sense of reversed from how it should be. Mar 1, 2016 at 17:52
  • 3
    since there is some confusion: @Geparda use the other slash :)
    – rsm
    Jan 21, 2017 at 7:03
  • 2
    @WinstonEwert Don't you think you should rephrase it to avoid the confusion, instead of leaving it as is? Jul 17, 2018 at 17:39
  • 8
    @LucaBezerra, there isn't any evidence that anyone was confused, just that some people are pedantic. Jul 18, 2018 at 15:09
37

The newline character is actually '\n'.

0
12

All three way you can use for newline character :

'\n'

"\n"

"""\n"""
1
11
>>> A = ['a1', 'a2', 'a3']
>>> B = ['b1', 'b2', 'b3']

>>> for x in A:
        for i in B:
            print ">" + x + "\n" + i

Outputs:

>a1
b1
>a1
b2
>a1
b3
>a2
b1
>a2
b2
>a2
b3
>a3
b1
>a3
b2
>a3
b3

Notice that you are using /n which is not correct!

0
10
for pair in zip(A, B):
    print ">"+'\n'.join(pair)
2

\n is an escape sequence, denoted by the backslash. A normal forward slash, such as /n will not do the job. In your code you are using /n instead of \n.

2

You can print a native linebreak using the standard os library

import os
with open('test.txt','w') as f:
    f.write(os.linesep)
2

Also if you're making it a console program, you can do: print(" ") and continue your program. I've found it the easiest way to separate my text.

1
A = ['a1', 'a2', 'a3'] 
B = ['b1', 'b2', 'b3']
for a,b in zip(A,B): 
    print(f">{a}\n{b}")

Below python 3.6 instead of print(f">{a}\n{b}") use print(">%s\n%s" % (a, b))

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