2

Suppose you have a vector of one type that you want to assign to another of different type ?

#include <vector>

int main() {
    std::vector ints = {0,1,2,3};
    std::vector<long long int> llints =  ints;//compile error here
    return 0;
}

Try it yourself

How is this possible with a one-liner (one expression), not using lambda, using only std or boost ?

2
  • Note that you aren't assigning, but initializing the vector in this example. Commented Jan 21, 2020 at 12:42
  • I actually meant assign, the example was bad
    – darune
    Commented Jan 21, 2020 at 12:54

3 Answers 3

5

If you want to construct, you can use the two iterator constructor:

std::vector<long long int> llints(ints.begin(), ints.end());

If you want to assign to an existing vector, you can use the two iterator std::vector::assign member function:

std::vector<long long int> llints;
...
llints.assign(ints.begin(), ints.end());
5
  • suppose the vector is returned from a function, is there a way to avoid introducing a temporary variable ?
    – darune
    Commented Jan 21, 2020 at 13:02
  • @darune You coudl just say return vector<long long int>(ints.begin(), ints.end());. Copies would almost certainly be elided before c++17, and I think are guaranteed to be elided since c++17. Commented Jan 21, 2020 at 14:10
  • @darune Or, just return llints;. I am not sure if the copy elision is guaranteed, but it will most likely take place. Commented Jan 21, 2020 at 14:11
  • its the ints / input vector thats returned from a funcion. I solved it with a temporary, theres no straightforward way to fix until maybe c++20
    – darune
    Commented Jan 22, 2020 at 8:11
  • @darune I'm not sure what needs "fixing". There isn't enough context. But you could ask a question on SO. Commented Jan 22, 2020 at 9:09
1

There's the (surprisingly hidden) boost::copy_range

#include <vector>
#include "boost/range/iterator_range.hpp"

int main() {
    std::vector ints = {0,1,2,3};
    auto llints = boost::copy_range<std::vector<long long int>>(ints);
    return 0;
}
1

Here’s a one-liner:

std::vector<long long int> llints(begin(ints), end(ints));

It uses the constructor that accepts an iterator pair.

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