8

How do i nicely/idiomatically split a string at a list of positions?

What I have:

.say for split-at( "0019ABX26002", (3, 4, 8) ); 

sub split-at( $s, @positions )
{
  my $done = 0;

  gather 
  {
    for @positions -> $p
    {
      take $s.substr($done, $p - $done );
      $done = $p;
    }
    take $s.substr( $done, * );
  }
}

which is reasonable. I am puzzled by the lack of language support for this though. If "split on" is a thing, why isn't "split at" too? I think this should be a core operation. I should be able to write

.say for "0019ABX26002".split( :at(3, 4, 8) );

Or maybe I am overlooking something?

Edit: A little Benchmark of what we have so far

O------------O---------O------------O--------O-------O-------O
|            | Rate    | array-push | holli  | raiph | simon |
O============O=========O============O========O=======O=======O
| array-push | 15907/s | --         | -59%   | -100% | -91%  |
| holli      | 9858/s  | 142%       | --     | -100% | -79%  |
| raiph      | 72.8/s  | 50185%     | 20720% | --    | 4335% |
| simon      | 2901/s  | 1034%      | 369%   | -98%  | --    |
O------------O---------O------------O--------O-------O-------O

Code:

use Bench;

my $s = "aaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaabbbbbbbbbbbbbbbbbbbbbbbbbbbbbbbbbbbbccccddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddefggggggggggggggggggg";
my @p = 29, 65, 69, 105, 106, 107;

Bench.new.cmpthese(1000, {
  holli  => sub { my @ = holli($s, @p); },
  simon => sub { my @ = simon($s, @p); },
  raiph => sub { my @ = raiph($s, @p); },
  array-push => sub { my @ = array-push($s, @p); },
});

#say user($s, @p);


sub simon($str, *@idxs ) {
    my @rotors = @idxs.map( { state $l = 0; my $o = $_ - $l; $l = $_; $o } );
    $str.comb("").rotor( |@rotors,* ).map(*.join(""));
}

sub raiph($s, @p) {
    $s.split( / <?{$/.pos == any(@p)}> / )
}

sub holli( $s, @positions )
{
  my $done = 0;

  gather
  {
    for @positions -> $p
    {
      take $s.substr($done, $p - $done );
      $done = $p;
    }
    take $s.substr( $done, * );
  }
}

sub array-push( $s, @positions )
{
  my $done = 0;
  my @result;

  for @positions -> $p
  {
    @result.push: $s.substr($done, $p - $done );
    $done = $p;
  }
  @result.push: $s.substr( $done, * );

  @result;
}
  • So for this you're expecting : ("001", "9", "ABX2", "6002") ? – Scimon Proctor Jan 22 at 17:25
  • In this case, that would be the output yes. – Holli Jan 22 at 17:27
  • If you're looking for raw speed, making an explicit return array is a fair bit faster: I get ~15k with gather/take, vs nearly 19k with Array/push, but that's assuming that each item is ultimately needed. – user0721090601 Jan 22 at 22:12
  • Oh wow, i didnt expect that. I measure a near 100% speed difference between my initial code and the eqiv. code with an explicit array and pushes. Any idea why gather is so much slower? – Holli Jan 22 at 22:25
  • 2
    In light of this question, I've added a module: String::Fields. It's interface is slightly different, but I think it is also more flexible and more useful in other situations. – Elizabeth Mattijsen Jan 24 at 16:41
9

Personally I'd split it into a list, use rotor to divide the list up and join the result :

"0019ABX26002".comb().rotor(3,1,4,*).map(*.join)

If you want a split at function (using the indexes given) :

sub split-at( $str, *@idxs ) { 
    my @rotors = @idxs.map( { state $l = 0; my $o = $_ - $l; $l = $_; $o } );
    $str.comb("").rotor( |@rotors,* ).map(*.join("")); 
}

Basically if I want to do list type stuff I use a list.

I came up with another version that I really like from a functional programming sense :

sub split-at( $str, *@idxs ) {
    (|@idxs, $str.codes)
    ==> map( { state $s = 0;my $e = $_ - $s;my $o = [$s,$e]; $s = $_; $o } )
    ==> map( { $str.substr(|$_) } );
}

It works out to be slightly slower than the other one.

  • 2
    Eh well. We think alike, and almost at the same time :-) – jjmerelo Jan 22 at 17:34
  • Thank you for reminding me of the existence of rotor. In this case though. You are doing a lot of work for what should be simple operation. – Holli Jan 22 at 17:46
4

One way:

.say for "0019ABX26002" .split: / <?{ $/.pos ∈ (3,4,8) }> /

displays:

001
9
ABX2
6002
  • 1
    Neat. But quite complicated. – Holli Jan 22 at 17:29
  • 1
    Also very slow. Check out the benchmark – Holli Jan 22 at 21:25
  • 1
    Hi Holli. I've upvoted your comments to signal agreement with them all, including that it's slow. /// As a consolation prize for my regex approach, one can replace the original == 3|4|8 with ∈ @pos to improve the speed. (And some might prefer the way it reads too.) – raiph Jan 22 at 23:54
3

Because each substring does not depend on the other, hyper becomes an option.

method split-at(\p) {
  do hyper for (0,|p) Z (|p,self.chars) {
    self.substr: .head, .tail - .head
  }
}

Or in sub form:

sub split-at(\s, \p) {
  do hyper for (0,|p) Z (|p,s.chars) {
    s.substr: .head, .tail - .head
  }
}

But the overhead involved is not worth it unless the number of elements requested is extreme — in my tests it's about ten times slower than the naïve form.

2

Here's the solution I would use:

my method break (Str \s: *@i where .all ~~ Int) {
  gather for @i Z [\+] 0,|@i -> ($length, $start) {
    take s.substr: $start, $length
  }
}

say "abcdefghi".&break(2,3,4)   # "ab","cde","fghi"

The gather/take lets it be lazy if you ultimately don't need to use all of them. The loop takes @i (2,3,4 in the example) and zips it up with the cascading addition reducer [\+], which would normally produce 2,5,9, but we insert a 0 to make it 0,2,5,9 to mark the starting indexes of each one. This lets the actual take be a simple substr operation.

By making it a method instead of a sub, you can use it just like you would (you could even name it split if you want, the addition of the & sigil means Raku won't be confused whether you want the built in or custom made one.

You could, even, add it directly to Str:

use MONKEY-TYPING;   # enable augment
augment class Str {
  multi method split (Str \s: *@i where .all ~~ Int) {
    gather for @i Z [\+] 0,|@i -> ($length, $start) {
      take s.substr: $start, $length
    }
  }
}

say "abcdefghi".split(2,3,4)

In this case, it needs to be defined as multi method since there are already various split methods. The nice thing is since none of those are defined by only Int arguments, it's easy to ensure our augmented one gets used.

That said, calling it using the sigiled version in a lexical method is definitely the better one.

  • ACk, I just realized you'd prefer an :at named parameter, I'll update to do that. – user0721090601 Jan 22 at 18:51
  • I don't prefer it per se. I'd want it to be in the language. It's common enough. We already have half a dozen variants of split. Such a one would be a reasonable addition, imho. – Holli Jan 22 at 19:01
  • Holli: Actually, I think it would make more sense in comb rather than in split, as comb is already designed to work on integers. How about this? tio.run/##VVLJasMwFLz7KwYTgk1dZyn0kODQaw@FQo4lLbIs26LygiTThCy/… – user0721090601 Jan 22 at 20:43
  • Also, core additions can be done, and can be proposed in github.com/Raku/problem-solving . In this case, I would think a proposal to comb() might be fairly easy to get approved, although it might not make it into core until 6.f (not sure if 6.e is still open for things) – user0721090601 Jan 22 at 20:46
  • Your solution is expecting lenghts as input, not positions. – Holli Jan 22 at 21:17

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