1

I have different users that will access different funcionality in the plataform and have different information associated with them. I implemented the tables according to the diagram bellow, where I have a User table with authentication data and I have two tables for two user types with their corresponding information.

Database diagram

I have a one to one relationship from "zpeedr <-> user" and the same for "merchant <-> user". I'm using flask_sqlalchemy with a postgresql database. It's not possible to instanciate a zpeedr or merchant type user without associating it with an existing user.id, as intended. My problem is that using this setup I'm able to assign the same user_id for both the zpeedr and the merchant. How I make sure that one user.id can only associated by either a zpeedr user or a merchant user?

My simplified code for table creation is:

class User(UserMixin, db.Model): ''' User properties ''' id = db.Column(db.Integer, primary_key=True) role = db.Column(db.String(10), nullable=False) name = db.Column(db.String(50), nullable=False) email = db.Column(db.String(50), unique=True, nullable=False) password_hash = db.Column(db.String(250), nullable=False) status = db.Column(db.String(15), server_default="Pending") registration_date = db.Column(db.DateTime, server_default=db.func.current_timestamp()) zpeedr = db.relationship('Zpeedr', backref='user', uselist=False) merchant = db.relationship('Merchant', backref='user', uselist=False)

def __init__(self, role, name, email, password_hash, status, registration_date, zpeedr, merchant):
    self.role = role
    self.name = name
    self.email = email
    self.password_hash = password_hash
    self.status = status
    self.registration_date = registration_date
    self.zpeedr = zpeedr
    self.merchant = merchant

class Zpeedr(db.Model): ''' Zpeedr Properties ''' id = db.Column(db.Integer, primary_key=True) # Foreign key to User table user_id = db.Column(db.Integer, db.ForeignKey('user.id'), nullable=False, unique=True) address = db.Column(db.String(200), nullable=False) location = db.Column(db.String(50), nullable=False) zipcode = db.Column(db.String(10), nullable=False) contact = db.Column(db.String(15), nullable=False) vat = db.Column(db.String(20), nullable=False, unique=True) nin = db.Column(db.String(20), nullable=False, unique=True)

def __init__(self, user_id, address, location, zipcode, contact, vat, nin):
    self.user_id = user_id
    self.address = address
    self.location = location
    self.zipcode = zipcode
    self.contact = contact
    self.vat = vat
    self.nin = nin

class Merchant(db.Model): ''' Merchant Properties ''' id = db.Column(db.Integer, primary_key=True) # ForeignKey to User table user_id = db.Column(db.Integer, db.ForeignKey('user.id'), nullable=False, unique=True) ticker = db.Column(db.String(4), nullable=False) category = db.Column(db.String(10), nullable=False) address = db.Column(db.String(200), nullable=False) location = db.Column(db.String(50), nullable=False) zipcode = db.Column(db.String(10), nullable=False) contact = db.Column(db.String(15), nullable=False) vat = db.Column(db.String(20), nullable=False, unique=True) nin = db.Column(db.String(20), nullable=False, unique=True) # Establish relationship with Support_merchant Table (one-to-many) support_merchant = db.relationship('Support_merchant', backref='merchant')

def __init__(self, user_id, ticker, category, address, location, zipcode, contact, vat, nin): self.user_id = user_id self.ticker = ticker self.category = category self.address = address self.location = location self.zipcode = zipcode self.contact = contact self.vat = vat self.nin = nin

1 Answer 1

1

If the purpose of table user is simply store common data you can use postgres inheritance.

In a very semplified model you can have: the parent table with all common data

create table user_(
  type varchar(1)
  );

and your children:

 create table zeepdr(
   id integer primary key,
   nin varchar
   ) inherits(user_);

 create table merchant(
   id integer primary key,
   ticker char(4)
  ) inherits(user_);

The corresponding code in SQLAlchemy should be something like this:

Table("zeepdr", metadata, ..., postgresql_inherits="user_")

Basic Usage

Insert

From what I think of goats you don't need of user that are neither merchant nor zeepdr so you will insert data as if the parent table did not exist:

insert into zeepdr(id, type, nin) values(1,'Z','a');
insert into merchant(id, type, ticker) values(1,'M','aaaa');

This means also that a user will be either a merchant or a zeepdr.

Select

select * from zeepdr;

behaves as you expect. Moreover if you want retrieve only common data from all user you can use keyword ONLY:

select * from ONLY user_;

or in SQLAlchemy

result = table.select().with_hint(table, 'ONLY', 'postgresql')

Some more information: constraint

Only check or not-null constaints are inherited, unless you use NO INHERIT. Other type are no inherited.

Last not least

Some more information about inheritance and SQLAlchemy here

1
  • 1
    Very helpful! You pointed me in the right direction. My SQLAlchemy is a little bit different but I guess you can do it both ways. I followed docs.sqlalchemy.org/en/13/orm/inheritance.html to create a Joined Table Inheritance. Also removed the constructors as Flask-SQLAlchemy base model defines them and they work by default. Jan 23, 2020 at 16:29

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.