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I would like to know if there is a function in NetworkX to solve the TSP? I can not find it. Am I missing something? I know it's an NP hard problem but there should be some approximate solutions right?

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    @bottledatthesource Does this help? docs.ocean.dwavesys.com/projects/dwave-networkx/en/latest/…
    – micah
    Commented Jan 23, 2020 at 21:35
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    @bottledatthesource TSP is not equivalent to finding all shortest paths (what Dijkstra does)
    – Marat
    Commented Jan 23, 2020 at 21:51
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    I see dwavesys implementation but I thought I wanted it straight from NetworkX. Anyhow my question really is which of the algorithms pertain to TSP (from a source to any target travel through all the nodes with shortest path weight). For example, these are very confusing: networkx.github.io/documentation/stable/reference/algorithms/… Commented Jan 23, 2020 at 22:00
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    @bottledatthesource networkx is a graph manipulation library, sort of a numpy for graphs. Problems like TSP are out of its scope
    – Marat
    Commented Jan 23, 2020 at 22:37
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    @Marat the fact that this function is dwave_networkx doesn't change the fact that this problem is in the scope of Networkx, the other examples, .i.e. Djikstra, Kruskal, Ford-Bellman, I mentioned are all implemented in networkx
    – hola
    Commented Feb 27, 2020 at 15:22

2 Answers 2

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Networkx provides an approximate solution to TSP, see page. Their solution is based on writting TSP as Quadratic Unconstrained Binary Optimization (QUBO) problem.

Note that it is proven that finding an alpha-approximation to TSP is proven to be NP-hard in general. So you can't have a guarantee on the quality the obtained result. Howver there is a particular case, Euclidean-TSP, where we can construct 2-approximation and even 1.5-approximation of TSP, using Christofides algorithm however I was not able to find the implementation of this algorithm in Networkx.

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    Note that the link to the TSP solution is from a 3rd-party package named dwave_networkx and is not part of networkx core. Commented Apr 26, 2021 at 13:09
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Recent versions of networkx include some algorithms for approximating or brute-forcing solutions to the tsp: see the docs for some examples.

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