2

I recently found about lolcat. I liked it so much for I want to redirect all my output through lolcat. In the terminal, this can be achieved by

ls -lh | lolcat

This will output color. If I want to do it again for all the commands, let's say for

cat /filename.sh | lolcat

If I want to make this permanent and make an alias and push it my .bashrc file

cat='cat |lolcat'

This will run but I have to write a lot of aliases for a load of commands.

All I know is I can catch terminal inputs and replace inline using $1, $2 and so on, but I want it robust only to do at one place that can replace all the other commands as well.

3
  • I'm not sure whether you'll really want to do it all the time, but … consider making a directory (perhaps $HOME/lolcat), and in it create a file containing export PATH=$(echo "$PATH" | sed "s%$HOME/lolcat%%g") —— $(basename $0) "$@" | lolcat. The export removes the 'lolcat' directory from PATH; the second runs the command avoiding the version in the 'lolcat' directory. Then add a symlink for every command you want mapped ('aliased') in the directory that points to the wrapper. FInally, add $HOME/lolcat to the front of your PATH so that those names are picked up first. Care needed! Jan 24, 2020 at 6:06
  • 1
    Note that ls | lolcat probably doesn't produce the same output as ls does (give or take colouring). You won't want to use vim piped to lolcat either. Jan 24, 2020 at 6:08
  • @google : Did you consider, that piping your stdout into lolcat would obscure the exit code of your original command? Even if you use this only interactively, you can't have the nice feature anymore to get the exit code of the most recent command shown in your prompt, because it would just show the exit code of lolcat. Jan 24, 2020 at 7:27

3 Answers 3

6

The best solution I could come up with for what you think you want, is to add this to your .bashrc:

lol()
{
    if [ -t 1 ]; then
        "$@" | lolcat
    else
        "$@"
    fi
}

bind 'RETURN: "\e[1~lol \e[4~\n"'

The lol() function takes any command, executes it, and pipes its stdout to lolcat if stdout is a terminal.

You can run lol ls and it will pipe ls to lolcat.

The bind command tells readline, the library bash uses to read input, to behave differently when you press Enter in bash.

The normal behavior is to just insert \n.

This command (shamelessly stolen from this answer) will cause Enter to go to the beginning of the line, enter the text lol then go back to the end of the line, and only then insert \n.

If you use this, you'll see in the terminal how your commands are being prefixed with lol.

You will quickly discover that this is quite annoying. Because you redirect stuff, then things stop working.

For example, with this, man ls doesn't open in a pager, because it man detects that stdout is not a terminal but rather a pipe. And don't even try to use vim.

Another issue is that you'll type ls, and it will turn into lol ls, and then when you press the Up key to have the last command be executed, and press Enter, it will turn into lol lol ls.

The gist is, you want to be specific about the commands that you redirect, and be able to run the original commands, by having this in your .bashrc:

lol()
{
    if [ -t 1 ]; then
        "$@" | lolcat
    else
        "$@"
    fi
}

COMMANDS=(
    ls
    cat
)

for COMMAND in "${COMMANDS[@]}"; do
    alias "${COMMAND}=lol ${COMMAND}"
    alias ".${COMMAND}=$(which ${COMMAND})"
done

The lol() function is the same as before, except now the COMMANDS array contains all the commands (argument-agnostic) that you may redirect.

For example, ls /usr will actually run lol ls /usr, but running .ls /usr will run /bin/ls /usr.

1
  • i like this idea but with a small modification, i can use these two as a different solution which i am able to understand. thank you.
    – i_am_deesh
    Jan 24, 2020 at 7:44
1

Most likely, you do not want to create individual aliases for commands, as this may impact operation of pipes, scripts, etc, which will be using commands like cat, ls implicitly.

Also, recall that some commands are visual in nature (vi, emacs, info), and are likely to have trouble if the output goes through the lolcat filter.

Putting a side those potential issues, and focusing on how to implement: Consider redirecting all output via the lolcat filter, and excluding the (few) visual commands from the redirection. The sequence save the current stdout (terminal) to fd #3.

alias vi 'vi >&3'
alias emacs `emacs >&3'
...
exec 3>&1 > >(lolcat)
2
  • 1
    I don't want to write alias for all commands that what i specifically asked.
    – i_am_deesh
    Jan 24, 2020 at 8:34
  • @i_am_deesh Wanted to emphasize that the proposed solution is to create aliases for the commands that you do NOT want to filter view lolcat (the "visual" commands, like vi, emacs). In theory, much shorter list than than the commands that you want the filter to be active. Also note that the above solution works with multi line commands (continuations, control flows (if/while/for) etc.
    – dash-o
    Aug 9, 2022 at 23:48
0

The whole credit goe's to the accepted answer I am just extracting what is the solution for future finder like me.

 lol()
 {
   if [ -t 1 ]; then
       "$@" | lolcat
   else
       "$@"
   fi
 }

This alone is enough for my problem. I can use the lol function + command if I want to make the output coloured with lolcat

The below one will make all the commands mentioned in the COMMANDS variable as coloured by default.

 COMMANDS=(
           ls
           cat
           )

 for COMMAND in "${COMMANDS[@]}"; do
    alias "${COMMAND}=${COMMAND} | lolcat"
    alias ".${COMMAND}=$(which ${COMMAND})"
 done

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.