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I get the checksum and mode (permissions) of a file on a server IP using ansible's stat module.

I have generated a variable file which stores the past file information like below:

cat gc.yaml
---
10.9.9.112:
  name: 
    - /tmp/conf/httpd.conf
    - /tmp/conf/extra/httpd-ssl.conf
  hash: 
    - 8g8gf8d8d8ds8s8s7
    - 7t7t7t7t7t7t7t7t
  mode: 
    - 0754
    - 0755    
10.9.9.114:
  name: 
    - /was/conf/httpd.conf
    - /was/conf/extra/httpd-ssl.conf
  hash: 
    - 5r5r5r5r5r5r5r5r
    - 2o2o2o2o2o2o2o2
  mode: 
    - 0754
    - 0750

Is this the correct way to design the variable file? Under the IP I have a duplicate name, mode, and checksum one for httpd.conf and other httpd-ssl.conf. I'm not sure if this is the correct structure. Kindly propose to incase this will not work and I can design the gc.yaml accordingly.

My requirement is to check if the current play's stat for a particular file matches the one in the gc.yaml

My playbook looks like below:

ansible-playbook /app/test.yml -e files_list="/tmp/conf/httpd.conf,/tmp/conf/extra/httpd-ssl.conf"

  tasks:

   - name: Get stat of the files from `{{ inventory_hostname }}`
     stat:
       path: "{{ item }}"
     register: files_det
     with_items: "{{ files_list.split(',') }}"

   - debug:
       msg: "HERE IS CKSUM_{{ item.stat.checksum }}.HERE IS MODE_{{ item.stat.mode }}"
     with_items: "{{ files_det.results }}"

Below is where i wish read corresponding data from gc.yaml and compare with the files_det variable however, I'm not sure how to read the gc.yaml data

   - include_vars:
       file="{{ playbook_dir }}/gc.yaml"
       name=user1

   - debug: var=user1

   - debug:
       msg: "HERE IS THE NAME:{{ item }}"
     with_dict: 10.9.9.112

   - debug:
       msg: "HERE IS THE NAME:{{ item }}.name  HERE is the VALUE:{{ item }}.hash"
     with_dict: "{{ user1 }}"

Given an iP address, how can we get mode and checksum for each file?

Kindly suggest?

  • Any suggestions / solutions anyone ? – Ashar Jan 26 at 18:27
  • I'm not really clear what you're trying to do. But do note that you cannot have duplicate keys in a dictionary...maybe you want to use a list? – larsks Jan 26 at 18:49
  • @larsks I guess this format is what you are suggesting for my include_vars gc.yml --- 10.9.9.112: name: '["/tmp/conf/httpd.conf", "/tmp/conf/extra/httpd-ssl.conf"]' hash: '["8g8gf8d8d8ds8s8s", "7t7t7t7t7t7t7t7t"]' mode: '["0754", "0755"] 10.9.9.114: name: '["/was/conf/httpd.conf", "/was/conf/extra/httpd-ssl.conf"]' hash: '["5r5r5r5r5r5r5r5r", "2o2o2o2o2o2o2o2"]' mode: '["0754", "0750"]' Can you still guide me on how can I read the hash for a particular file say /was/conf/extra/httpd-ssl.conf for IP 10.9.9.114 inside my play ? – Ashar Jan 26 at 19:24
  • @larsks I updated my original post with your suggestion. Can you still guide me on how can I read the hash for a particular file say /was/conf/extra/httpd-ssl.conf for IP 10.9.9.114 inside my play ? – Ashar Jan 26 at 19:32
1

It's not entirely clear what you're trying to accomplish, so I'm making a few assumptions here. I think you'll find things easiest if you restructure your gc.yaml file so that it looks like this:

---
hosts:
  - host: 10.9.9.112
    files:
       - name: /tmp/conf/httpd.conf
         hash: 8g8gf8d8d8ds8s8s
         mode: 0754
       - name: /tmp/conf/extra/httpd-ssl.conf
         hash: 7t7t7t7t7t7t7t7t
         mode: 0755

  - host: 10.9.9.114
    files:
       - name: /was/conf/httpd.conf
         hash: 5r5r5r5r5r5r5r5r
         mode: 0754
       - name: /was/conf/extra/httpd-ssl.conf
         hash: 2o2o2o2o2o2o2o2
         mode: 0750

We have a top level hosts key whose value is a list. Each list item is a dictionary with a host key that has a hostname, and a files key that has a list of files.

This structure makes the data useful with Ansible's subelements filter.

For example, given the following playbook:

---
- name: Enable Site
  hosts: localhost
  gather_facts: false
  tasks:
    - include_vars:
        file: "{{ playbook_dir }}/gc.yaml"
        name: user1

    - debug:
        msg: "file {{ item.1.name }} on host {{ item.0.host }} has hash {{ item.1.hash }}"
      loop: "{{ user1.hosts|subelements('files') }}"
      loop_control:
        label: "{{ item.0.host }}:{{ item.1.name }}"

We get the following output:


PLAY [Enable Site] *******************************************************************

TASK [include_vars] ******************************************************************
ok: [localhost]

TASK [debug] *************************************************************************
ok: [localhost] => (item=10.9.9.112:/tmp/conf/httpd.conf) => {
    "msg": "file /tmp/conf/httpd.conf on host 10.9.9.112 has hash 8g8gf8d8d8ds8s8s"
}
ok: [localhost] => (item=10.9.9.112:/tmp/conf/extra/httpd-ssl.conf) => {
    "msg": "file /tmp/conf/extra/httpd-ssl.conf on host 10.9.9.112 has hash 7t7t7t7t7t7t7t7t"
}
ok: [localhost] => (item=10.9.9.114:/was/conf/httpd.conf) => {
    "msg": "file /was/conf/httpd.conf on host 10.9.9.114 has hash 5r5r5r5r5r5r5r5r"
}
ok: [localhost] => (item=10.9.9.114:/was/conf/extra/httpd-ssl.conf) => {
    "msg": "file /was/conf/extra/httpd-ssl.conf on host 10.9.9.114 has hash 2o2o2o2o2o2o2o2"
}

PLAY RECAP ***************************************************************************
localhost                  : ok=2    changed=0    unreachable=0    failed=0    skipped=0    rescued=0    ignored=0   

The subelements filter provides our loop with a list of tuples such that the first item of the tuple iterates through the items of the hosts list, and the second item iterates through the items in the files list for the current host.

That is, the first time we iterate through the loop, item contains:

- host: 10.9.9.12
  files:
    - name: /tmp/conf/httpd.conf
      hash: 8g8gf8d8d8ds8s8s
      mode: 0754
    - name: /tmp/conf/extra/httpd-ssl.conf
      hash: 7t7t7t7t7t7t7t7t
      mode: 0755
- name: /tmp/conf/httpd.conf
  hash: 8g8gf8d8d8ds8s8s
  mode: 0754

And the second time:

- host: 10.9.9.12
  files:
    - name: /tmp/conf/httpd.conf
      hash: 8g8gf8d8d8ds8s8s
      mode: 0754
    - name: /tmp/conf/extra/httpd-ssl.conf
      hash: 7t7t7t7t7t7t7t7t
      mode: 0755
- name: /tmp/conf/extra/httpd-ssl.conf
  hash: 7t7t7t7t7t7t7t7t
  mode: 0755

And so on.


If you're not going to be looping over the data, but instead want to be able to get the hash of a file given a filename, then structure your data like this instead:

---
10.9.9.112:
   /tmp/conf/httpd.conf:
     hash: 8g8gf8d8d8ds8s8s
     mode: 0754
   /tmp/conf/extra/httpd-ssl.conf:
     hash: 7t7t7t7t7t7t7t7t
     mode: 0755

10.9.9.114:
   /was/conf/httpd.conf:
     hash: 5r5r5r5r5r5r5r5r
     mode: 0754
   /was/conf/extra/httpd-ssl.conf:
     hash: 2o2o2o2o2o2o2o2
     mode: 0750

Now your filenames are dictionary keys, so you can ask for user1[<host>][<filename>], like this:

---
- name: Enable Site
  hosts: localhost
  gather_facts: false
  tasks:
    - include_vars:
        file: "{{ playbook_dir }}/gc.yaml"
        name: user1

    - debug:
        msg: "file {{ item.file }} on host {{ item.host }} has hash {{ user1[item.host][item.file].hash }}"
      loop:
        - host: 10.9.9.112
          file: /tmp/conf/extra/httpd-ssl.conf

The above results in:

TASK [debug] *****************************************************************************************************************************************************************
ok: [localhost] => (item={'host': '10.9.9.112', 'file': '/tmp/conf/extra/httpd-ssl.conf'}) => {
    "msg": "file /tmp/conf/extra/httpd-ssl.conf on host 10.9.9.112 has hash 7t7t7t7t7t7t7t7t"
}
  • This works but rather than looping (without looping) how can i directly get the details of the files given the ip address? Thus rather than looping all items how can i get the hash of a particular file say hash of /tmp/conf/extra/httpd-ssl.conf on 10.9.9.12 – Ashar Jan 27 at 3:51
  • I've updated the answer to show an example of directly accessing a hash like that. – larsks Jan 27 at 4:02
  • you are amazingly good!! – Ashar Jan 27 at 5:37

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