5

This may seem like a weird question, but I do not really see many use cases for useEffect in React (I am currently working on a several thousand-lines React codebase, and never used it once), and I think that there may be something I do not fully grasp.

If you are writing a functional component, what difference does it make to put your "effect" code in a useEffect hook vs. simply executing it in the body of the functional component (which is also executed on every render) ?

A typical use case would be fetching data when mounting a component : I see two approaches to this, one with useEffect and one without :

// without useEffect
const MyComponent = () => {
    [data, setData] = useState();
    if (!data) fetchDataFromAPI().then(res => setData(res));

    return(
        {data ? <div>{data}</div> : <div>Loading...</div>}
    )
}
// with useEffect
const MyComponent = () => {
    [data, setData] = useState();
    useEffect(() => {
    fetchDataFromAPI().then(res => setData(res))
    }, []);

    return(
        {data ? <div>{data}</div> : <div>Loading...</div>}
    )
}

Is there an advantage (performance-wise or other) to useEffect in such usecases ?

3
  • fetch data using some prop as parameter, update on prop change
    – xadm
    Jan 26, 2020 at 16:24
  • I actually just now had a case where i needed to re-load an image's data on a prop change, now I know useEffect is a perfect fit for this ! thanks
    – Ewaren
    Jan 26, 2020 at 22:58
  • useEffect clear can be usable with interval refetching
    – xadm
    Jan 26, 2020 at 23:09

3 Answers 3

1

I. Cleanup

What if your component gets destroyed before the fetch is completed? You get an error.

useEffect gives you an easy way to cleanup in handler's return value.

II. Reactions to prop change.

What if you have a userId passed in a props that you use to fetch data. Without useEffect you'll have to duplicate userId in the state to be able to tell if it changed so that you can fetch the new data.

5
  • Ok, that second use case you mention really does make sense ! But in the simple case I wrote (and imagining I add a catch after my fetch to handle possible errors), do you see a reason to use useEffect over the plain no-hook version ?
    – Ewaren
    Jan 26, 2020 at 19:31
  • @Ewaren the fist case is absolutely important. There's no way of knowing when the component is unmounted without useEffect so you are not able to do cleanup, i.e. cancel writes to local storage or db, clear some custom DOM operations or listeners, release memory to avoid leaks...
    – marzelin
    Jan 26, 2020 at 19:51
  • 1
    @Ewaren also in your without useEffect code snippet if there are renders between the time a component is initialized and the fetch is complete, there will be other, redundant fetches since data will still be undefined. You have to use another state variable to keep track of the sent request. tldr; even if you can replace useEffect with useState in some situations, it's not a good idea.
    – marzelin
    Jan 26, 2020 at 21:13
  • Is there really anything to clean up in my case above ? Just fetching data from a REST API doesn't need any clean up, does it ? And this may be a whole other topic but... memory leaks ? I know this happens in C++ for instance, but do you even have control over this in JS ?
    – Ewaren
    Jan 26, 2020 at 22:57
  • @Ewaren in your example setData is a memory leak (the browser needs to keep the reference to the component even if it might be unmounted and normally would be destroyed till the response comes back (and it may never come back). Fortunately, React does its magic and frees up all it can (basically assigns everything to null) so it's not much of a concern. But it's still a bad practice. You should use cancellable promises and useEffect. Here's a good article about leaks: blog.sessionstack.com/…
    – marzelin
    Jan 26, 2020 at 23:18
0

The thing is, useEffect is not executed on every render.

To see this more clearly, let's suppose that your component MyComponent is being rendered by a parent component (let's call it ParentComponent) and it receives a prop from that parent component that can change from a user action.

ParentComponent

const ParentComponent = () => {
    const [ counter, setCounter ] = useState(0);
    const onButtonClicked = () => setCounter(counter + 1);

    return (
        <>
            <button onClick={onButtonClicked}>Click me!</button>
            <MyComponent counter={counter} />
        </>
    );
}

And your MyComponent (slightly modified to read and use counter prop):

const MyComponent = ({ counter }) => {
    [data, setData] = useState();

    useEffect(() => {
        fetchDataFromAPI().then(res => setData(res))
    }, []);

    return(
        <div>
            <div>{counter}</div>
            {data ? <div>{data}</div> : <div>Loading...</div>}
        </div>
    )
}

Now, when the component MyComponent is mounted for the first time, the fetch operation will be performed. If later the user clicks on the button and the counter is increased, the useEffect will not be executed (but the MyComponent function will be called in order to update due to counter having changed)!

If you don't use useEffect, when the user clicks on the button, the fetch operation will be executed again, since the counter prop has changed and the render method of MyComponent is executed.

1
  • I am actually quite positive that the if (!data) conditional guard in my first example would also prevent the operation from being executed again if the user clicked on the button, wouldn't it ?
    – Ewaren
    Jan 26, 2020 at 23:01
0

useEffect is handling the side effect of the problem. useEffect is the combination of componentDidMount and componentDidUpdate. every initial render and whenever props updated it will be executed.

For an exmaple:

useEffect(() => {
      fetchDataFromAPI().then(res => setData(res))
}, []);

Another example:

let's assume you have multiple state variables, the component will re-render for every state values change. But We may need to run useEffect in a specific scenario, rather than executing it for each state change.

function SimpleUseEffect() {

  let [userCount, setUserCount] = useState(0);
  let [simpleCount, setSimpleCount] = useState(0);

useEffect(() => {
    alert("Component User Count Updated...");
  }, [userCount]);

  useEffect(() => {
    alert("Component Simple Count Updated");
  }, [simpleCount]);

  return (
    <div>
      <b>User Count: {userCount}</b>
      <b>Simple Count: {simpleCount}</b>
      <input type="button" onClick={() => setUserCount(userCount + 1}} value="Add Employee" />
      <input type="button" onClick={() => setSimpleCount(simpleCount + 1}} value="Update Simple Count" />
    </div>
  )
}

In the above code whenever your props request changed, fetchDataFromAPI executes and updated the response data. If you don't use useEffect, You need to automatically handle all type of side effects.

  1. Making asynchronous API calls for data

  2. Setting a subscription to an observable

  3. Manually updating the DOM element

  4. Updating global variables from inside a function

for more details see this blog https://medium.com/better-programming/https-medium-com-mayank-gupta-6-88-react-useeffect-hooks-in-action-2da971cfe83f

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