133

The C11 standard appears to imply that iteration statements with constant controlling expressions should not be optimized out. I'm taking my advice from this answer, which specifically quotes section 6.8.5 from the draft standard:

An iteration statement whose controlling expression is not a constant expression ... may be assumed by the implementation to terminate.

In that answer it mentions that a loop like while(1) ; should not be subject to optimization.

So...why does Clang/LLVM optimize out the loop below (compiled with cc -O2 -std=c11 test.c -o test)?

#include <stdio.h>

static void die() {
    while(1)
        ;
}

int main() {
    printf("begin\n");
    die();
    printf("unreachable\n");
}

On my machine, this prints out begin, then crashes on an illegal instruction (a ud2 trap placed after die()). On godbolt, we can see that nothing is generated after the call to puts.

It's been a surprisingly difficult task to get Clang to output an infinite loop under -O2 - while I could repeatedly test a volatile variable, that involves a memory read that I don't want. And if I do something like this:

#include <stdio.h>

static void die() {
    while(1)
        ;
}

int main() {
    printf("begin\n");
    volatile int x = 1;
    if(x)
        die();
    printf("unreachable\n");
}

...Clang prints begin followed by unreachable as if the infinite loop never existed.

How do you get Clang to output a proper, no-memory-access infinite loop with optimizations turned on?

  • 3
    Comments are not for extended discussion; this conversation has been moved to chat. – Bhargav Rao Jan 28 at 0:09
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    There's no portable solution that doesn't involve a side effect. If you don't want a memory access, your best hope would be register volatile unsigned char; but register goes away in C++17. – Scott M Jan 28 at 1:17
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    Maybe this isn't in the scope of the question, but I'm curious why you want to do this. Surely there's some other way to accomplish your real task. Or is this just academic in nature? – Cruncher Jan 28 at 14:39
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    @Cruncher: The effects of any particular attempt to run a program may be useful, essentially useless, or substantially worse than useless. An execution that results in a program getting stuck in an endless loop may be useless, but still be preferable to other behaviors a compiler might substitute. – supercat Jan 28 at 23:56
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    @Cruncher: Because the code might be running in a freestanding context where there is no concept of exit(), and because code may have discovered a situation where it cannot guarantee that the effects of continued execution would not be worse than useless. A jump-to-self loop is a pretty lousy way of handling such situations, but it may nonetheless be the best way of handling a bad situation. – supercat Jan 29 at 17:52

13 Answers 13

77

The C11 standard says this, 6.8.5/6:

An iteration statement whose controlling expression is not a constant expression,156) that performs no input/output operations, does not access volatile objects, and performs no synchronization or atomic operations in its body, controlling expression, or (in the case of a for statement) its expression-3, may be assumed by the implementation to terminate.157)

The two foot notes are not normative but provide useful information:

156) An omitted controlling expression is replaced by a nonzero constant, which is a constant expression.

157) This is intended to allow compiler transformations such as removal of empty loops even when termination cannot be proven.

In your case, while(1) is a crystal clear constant expression, so it may not be assumed by the implementation to terminate. Such an implementation would be hopelessly broken, since "for-ever" loops is a common programming construct.

What happens to the "unreachable code" after the loop is however, as far as I know, not well-defined. However, clang does indeed behave very strange. Comparing the machine code with gcc (x86):

gcc 9.2 -O3 -std=c11 -pedantic-errors

.LC0:
        .string "begin"
main:
        sub     rsp, 8
        mov     edi, OFFSET FLAT:.LC0
        call    puts
.L2:
        jmp     .L2

clang 9.0.0 -O3 -std=c11 -pedantic-errors

main:                                   # @main
        push    rax
        mov     edi, offset .Lstr
        call    puts
.Lstr:
        .asciz  "begin"

gcc generates the loop, clang just runs into the woods and exits with error 255.

I'm leaning towards this being non-compliant behavior of clang. Because I tried to expand your example further like this:

#include <stdio.h>
#include <setjmp.h>

static _Noreturn void die() {
    while(1)
        ;
}

int main(void) {
    jmp_buf buf;
    _Bool first = !setjmp(buf);

    printf("begin\n");
    if(first)
    {
      die();
      longjmp(buf, 1);
    }
    printf("unreachable\n");
}

I added C11 _Noreturn in an attempt to help the compiler further along. It should be clear that this function will hang up, from that keyword alone.

setjmp will return 0 upon first execution, so this program should just smash into the while(1) and stop there, only printing "begin" (assuming \n flushes stdout). This happens with gcc.

If the loop was simply removed, it should print "begin" 2 times then print "unreachable". On clang however (godbolt), it prints "begin" 1 time and then "unreachable" before returning exit code 0. That's just plain wrong no matter how you put it.

I can find no case for claiming undefined behavior here, so my take is that this is a bug in clang. At any rate, this behavior makes clang 100% useless for programs like embedded systems, where you simply must be able to rely on eternal loops hanging the program (while waiting for a watchdog etc).

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  • 15
    I disagree on "this a crystal clear constant expression, so it may not be assumed by the implementation to terminate". This really gets into nit-picky language lawyering, but 6.8.5/6 is in the form of if (these) then you may assume (this). That does not mean if not (these) you may not assume (this). It's a specification only for when the conditions are met, not when they are unmet where you can do whatever you want withing the standards. And if there are no observables... – kabanus Jan 27 at 10:54
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    @kabanus The quoted part is a special case. If not (the special case), evaluate and sequence the code as you normally would. If you continue reading the same chapter, the controlling expression is evaluated as specified for each iteration statement ("as specified by the semantics") with the exception of the quoted special case. It follows the same rules as evaluation of any value computation, which is sequenced and well-defined. – Lundin Jan 27 at 11:52
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    I agree, but you would not be surpised that in int z=3; int y=2; int x=1; printf("%d %d\n", x, z); there is no 2 in the assembly, so in the empty useless sense x was not assigned after y but after z due to optimization. So going from your last sentence, we follow the regular rules, assume the while halted (because we were not constrained any better), and left in the final, "unreachable" print. Now, we optimize out that useless statement (because we don't know any better). – kabanus Jan 27 at 12:28
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    @MSalters One of my comments was deleted, but thanks for the input - and I agree. What my comment said is I think this is the heart of the debate - is a while(1); the same as a int y = 2; statement in terms of what semantics are we allowed to optimize out, even if their logic remains in the source. From n1528 I was under the impression that they may be the same, but since people way more experienced than me are arguing the other way, and it is an official bug apparently, then beyond a philosophical debate on whether the wording in the standard is explicit, the argument is rendered moot. – kabanus Jan 28 at 12:23
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    “Such an implementation would be hopelessly broken, since 'for-ever' loops is a common programming construct.” — I understand the sentiment but the argument is flawed because it could be applied identically to C++, yet a C++ compiler that optimised this loop away would not be broken but conformant. – Konrad Rudolph Jan 29 at 17:52
53

You need to insert an expression that may cause a side-effect.

The simplest solution:

static void die() {
    while(1)
       __asm("");
}

Godbolt link

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  • 21
    Doesn't explain why clang is acting up, however. – Lundin Jan 27 at 9:24
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    Just saying "it's a bug in clang" is sufficient though. I'd like to try a few things out here first though, before I yell "bug". – Lundin Jan 27 at 9:35
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    @Lundin I do not know if it is a bug. Standard is not technically precise in this case – P__J__ Jan 27 at 10:00
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    Luckily, GCC is open source and I can write a compiler that optimizes away your example. And I could do so for any example you come up with, now and in the future. – Thomas Weller Jan 27 at 16:32
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    @ThomasWeller: GCC devs wouldn't accept a patch that optimizes away this loop; it would violate documented = guaranteed behaviour. See my previous comment: asm("") is implicitly asm volatile(""); and thus the asm statement must run as many times as it does in the abstract machine gcc.gnu.org/onlinedocs/gcc/Basic-Asm.html. (Note that it's not safe for its side effects to include any memory or registers; you need Extended asm with a "memory" clobber if you want to read or write memory that you ever access from C. Basic asm is only safe for stuff like asm("mfence") or cli.) – Peter Cordes Jan 27 at 20:37
51

Other answers already covered ways to make Clang emit the infinite loop, with inline assembly language or other side effects. I just want to confirm that this is indeed a compiler bug. Specifically, it's a long-standing LLVM bug - it applies the C++ concept of "all loops without side-effects must terminate" to languages where it shouldn't, such as C.

For example, the Rust programming language also allows infinite loops and uses LLVM as a backend, and it has this same issue.

In the short term, it appears that LLVM will continue to assume that "all loops without side-effects must terminate". For any language that allows infinite loops, LLVM expects the front-end to insert llvm.sideeffect opcodes into such loops. This is what Rust is planning to do, so Clang (when compiling C code) will probably have to do that too.

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    Nothing like the smell of a bug that's older than a decade... with multiple proposed fixes and patches... yet still hasn't been fixed. – Ian Kemp Jan 29 at 10:41
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    @IanKemp: For them to fix the bug now would require acknowledging that they've taken ten years to fix the bug. Better to hold out hope that the Standard will change to justify their behavior. Of course, even if the standard did change, that still wouldn't justify their behavior except in the eyes of people who would regard the change to the Standard as an indication that the Standard's earlier behavioral mandate was a defect that should be corrected retroactively. – supercat Jan 29 at 19:57
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    It has been "fixed" in the sense that LLVM added the sideeffect op (in 2017) and expects front-ends to insert that op into loops at their discretion. LLVM had to pick some default for loops, and it happened to choose the one that aligns with C++'s behavior, intentionally or otherwise. Of course, there is still some optimization work left to be done, such as to merge consecutive sideeffect ops into one. (This is what is blocking the Rust front-end from using it.) So on that basis, the bug is in the front-end (clang) that doesn't insert the op in loops. – Arnavion Jan 29 at 21:22
  • @Arnavion: Is there any way to indicate that operations may be deferred unless or until the results are used, but that if data would cause a program to loop endlessly, trying to proceed past data dependencies would make the program worse than useless? Having to add phony side-effects which would prevent the former useful optimizations to prevent the optimizer from making a program worse than useless doesn't sound like a recipe for efficiency. – supercat Jan 30 at 3:43
  • That discussion probably belongs on the LLVM / clang mailing lists. FWIW the LLVM commit that added the op did also teach several optimization passes about it. Also, Rust experimented with inserting sideeffect ops to the start of every function and did not see any runtime performance regression. The only issue is a compile time regression, apparently due to the lack of fusion of consecutive ops like I mentioned in my previous comment. – Arnavion Jan 30 at 17:03
32

This is a Clang bug

... when inlining a function containing an infinite loop. The behaviour is different when while(1); appears directly in main, which smells very buggy to me.

See @Arnavion's answer for a summary and links. The rest of this answer was written before I had confirmation that it was a bug, let alone a known bug.


To answer the title question: How do I make an infinite empty loop that won't be optimized away?? -
make die() a macro, not a function, to work around this bug in Clang 3.9 and later. (Earlier Clang versions either keeps the loop or emits a call to a non-inline version of the function with the infinite loop.) That appears to be safe even if the print;while(1);print; function inlines into its caller (Godbolt). -std=gnu11 vs. -std=gnu99 doesn't change anything.

If you only care about GNU C, P__J__'s __asm__(""); inside the loop also works, and shouldn't hurt optimization of any surrounding code for any compilers that understand it. GNU C Basic asm statements are implicitly volatile, so this counts as a visible side-effect that has to "execute" as many times as it would in the C abstract machine. (And yes, Clang implements the GNU dialect of C, as documented by the GCC manual.)


Some people have argued that it might be legal to optimize away an empty infinite loop. I don't agree1, but even if we accept that, it can't also be legal for Clang to assume statements after the loop are unreachable, and let execution fall off the end of the function into the next function, or into garbage that decodes as random instructions.

(That would be standards-compliant for Clang++ (but still not very useful); infinite loops without any side effects are UB in C++, but not C.
Is while(1); undefined behavior in C? UB lets the compiler emit basically anything for code on a path of execution that will definitely encounter UB. An asm statement in the loop would avoid this UB for C++. But in practice, Clang compiling as C++ doesn't remove constant-expression infinite empty loops except when inlining, same as when compiling as C.)


Manually inlining while(1); changes how Clang compiles it: infinite loop present in asm. This is what we'd expect from a rules-lawyer POV.

#include <stdio.h>
int main() {
    printf("begin\n");
    while(1);
    //infloop_nonconst(1);
    //infloop();
    printf("unreachable\n");
}

On the Godbolt compiler explorer, Clang 9.0 -O3 compiling as C (-xc) for x86-64:

main:                                   # @main
        push    rax                       # re-align the stack by 16
        mov     edi, offset .Lstr         # non-PIE executable can use 32-bit absolute addresses
        call    puts
.LBB3_1:                                # =>This Inner Loop Header: Depth=1
        jmp     .LBB3_1                   # infinite loop


.section .rodata
 ...
.Lstr:
        .asciz  "begin"

The same compiler with the same options compiles a main that calls infloop() { while(1); } to the same first puts, but then just stops emitting instructions for main after that point. So as I said, execution just falls off the end of the function, into whatever function is next (but with the stack misaligned for function entry so it's not even a valid tailcall).

The valid options would be to

  • emit a label: jmp label infinite loop
  • or (if we accept that the infinite loop can be removed) emit another call to print the 2nd string, and then return 0 from main.

Crashing or otherwise continuing without printing "unreachable" is clearly not ok for a C11 implementation, unless there's UB that I haven't noticed.


Footnote 1:

For the record, I agree with @Lundin's answer which cites the standard for evidence that C11 doesn't allow assumption of termination for constant-expression infinite loops, even when they're empty (no I/O, volatile, synchronization, or other visible side-effects).

This is the set of conditions that would let a loop be compiled to an empty asm loop for a normal CPU. (Even if the body wasn't empty in the source, assignments to variables can't be visible to other threads or signal handlers without data-race UB while the loop is running. So a conforming implementation could remove such loop bodies if it wanted to. Then that leaves the question of whether the loop itself can be removed. ISO C11 explicitly says no.)

Given that C11 singles out that case as one where the implementation can't assume the loop terminates (and that it's not UB), it seems clear they intend the loop to be present at run-time. An implementation that targets CPUs with an execution model that can't do an infinite amount of work in finite time has no justification for removing an empty constant infinite loop. Or even in general, the exact wording is about whether they can be "assumed to terminate" or not. If a loop can't terminate, that means later code is not reachable, no matter what arguments you make about math and infinities and how long it takes to do an infinite amount of work on some hypothetical machine.

Further to that, Clang isn't merely an ISO C compliant DeathStation 9000, it's intended to be useful for real-world low-level systems programming, including kernels and embedded stuff. So whether or not you accept arguments about C11 allowing removal of while(1);, it doesn't make sense that Clang would want to actually do that. If you write while(1);, that probably wasn't an accident. Removal of loops that end up infinite by accident (with runtime variable control expressions) can be useful, and it makes sense for compilers to do that.

It's rare that you want to just spin until the next interrupt, but if you write that in C that's definitely what you expect to happen. (And what does happen in GCC and Clang, except for Clang when the infinite loop is inside a wrapper function).

For example, in a primitive OS kernel, when the scheduler has no tasks to run it might run the idle task. A first implementation of that might be while(1);.

Or for hardware without any power-saving idle feature, that might be the only implementation. (Until the early 2000s, that was I think not rare on x86. Although the hlt instruction did exist, IDK if it saved a meaningful amount of power until CPUs started having low-power idle states.)

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  • 1
    Out of curiousity, is anyone actually using clang for embedded systems? I've never seen it and I work exclusively with embedded. gcc only "recently" (10 years ago) entered the embedded market and I use that one sceptically, preferably with low optimizations and always with -ffreestanding -fno-strict-aliasing. It works fine with ARM and perhaps with legacy AVR. – Lundin Jan 28 at 9:14
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    @Lundin: IDK about embedded, but yes people do build kernels with clang, at least sometimes Linux. Presumably also Darwin for MacOS. – Peter Cordes Jan 28 at 9:37
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    bugs.llvm.org/show_bug.cgi?id=965 this bug looks relevant, but I'm not sure it is what we are seeing here. – bracco23 Jan 28 at 10:59
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    @lundin - I'm pretty sure we used GCC (and a lot of other toolkits) for embedded work all through the 90's, with RTOS's like VxWorks and PSOS. I don't understand why you say GCC only entered the embedded market recently. – Jeff Learman Feb 19 at 16:17
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    @JeffLearman Became mainstream recently, then? Anyway, the gcc strict aliasing fiasco only happened after the introduction of C99, and newer versions of it no longer seem to go bananas upon encountering strict aliasing violations either. Still, I remain sceptic whenever I use it. As for clang, the latest version is evidently completely broken when it comes to eternal loops, so it can't be used for embedded systems. – Lundin Feb 19 at 16:22
14

Just for the record, Clang also misbehaves with goto:

static void die() {
nasty:
    goto nasty;
}

int main() {
    int x; printf("begin\n");
    die();
    printf("unreachable\n");
}

It produces the same output as in the question, i.e.:

main: # @main
  push rax
  mov edi, offset .Lstr
  call puts
.Lstr:
  .asciz "begin"

I see don't see any way to read this as permitted in C11, which only says:

6.8.6.1(2) A goto statement causes an unconditional jump to the statement prefixed by the named label in the enclosing function.

As goto is not an "iteration statement" (6.8.5 lists while, do and for) nothing about the special "termination-assumed" indulgences apply, however you want to read them.

Per original question's Godbolt link compiler is x86-64 Clang 9.0.0 and flags are -g -o output.s -mllvm --x86-asm-syntax=intel -S --gcc-toolchain=/opt/compiler-explorer/gcc-9.2.0 -fcolor-diagnostics -fno-crash-diagnostics -O2 -std=c11 example.c

With others such as x86-64 GCC 9.2 you get the pretty well perfect:

.LC0:
  .string "begin"
main:
  sub rsp, 8
  mov edi, OFFSET FLAT:.LC0
  call puts
.L2:
  jmp .L2

Flags: -g -o output.s -masm=intel -S -fdiagnostics-color=always -O2 -std=c11 example.c

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  • A conforming implementation could have an undocumented translation limit on execution time or CPU cycles which could cause arbitrary behavior if exceeded, or if a programs inputs made exceeding the limit inevitable. Such things are a Quality of Implementation issue, outside the Standard's jurisdiction. It would seem odd that the maintainers of clang would be so insistent on their right to produce a poor quality implementation, but the Standard does allow it. – supercat Jan 29 at 4:08
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    @supercat thanks for comment ... why would exceeding a translation limit do anything other than fail the translation phase and refuse to execute? Also: "5.1.1.3 Diagnostics A conforming implementation shall produce ... diagnostic message ... if a preprocessing translation unit or translation unit contains a violation of any syntax rule or constraint ...". I can't see how erroneous behaviour at the execution phase can ever conform. – jonathanjo Jan 29 at 7:48
  • The Standard would be completely impossible to implement if implementation limits had to all be resolved at build time, since one could write a Strictly Conforming program which would require more bytes of stack than there are atoms in the universe. It's unclear whether runtime limitations should be lumped with "translation limits", but such a concession is clearly necessary, and there's no other category in which it could be put. – supercat Jan 29 at 15:40
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    I was responding to your comment about "translation limits". Of course there are also execution limits, I confess I don't understand why you're suggesting they should be lumped with translation limits or why you say that's necessary. I just don't see any reason for saying nasty: goto nasty can be conforming and not spin the CPU(s) until user or resource exhaustion intervenes. – jonathanjo Jan 29 at 17:08
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    The Standard makes no reference to "execution limits" that I could find. Things like function call nesting are usually handled by stack allocation, but a conforming implementation that limits function calls to a depth of 16 could build 16 copies of every function, and have a call to bar() within foo() be processed as a call from __1foo to __2bar, from __2foo to __3bar, etc. and from __16foo to __launch_nasal_demons, which would then allow all automatic objects to be statically allocated, and would make what's usually a "run-time" limit into a translation limit. – supercat Jan 29 at 17:17
6

I'll play the devil's advocate and argue that the standard does not explicitly forbid a compiler from optimizing out an infinite loop.

An iteration statement whose controlling expression is not a constant expression,156) that performs no input/output operations, does not access volatile objects, and performs no synchronization or atomic operations in its body, controlling expression, or (in the case of a for statement) its expression-3, may be assumed by the implementation to terminate.157)

Let's parse this. An iteration statement that satisfies certain criteria may be assumed to terminate:

if (satisfiesCriteriaForTerminatingEh(a_loop)) 
    if (whatever_reason_or_just_because_you_feel_like_it)
         assumeTerminates(a_loop);

This doesn't say anything about what happens if the criteria aren't satisfied and assuming that a loop may terminate even then isn't explicitly forbidden as long as other rules of the standard are observed.

do { } while(0) or while(0){} are after all iteration statements (loops) that don't satisfy the criteria that allow a compiler to just assume on a whim that they terminate and yet they obviously do terminate.

But can the compiler just optimize while(1){} out?

5.1.2.3p4 says:

In the abstract machine, all expressions are evaluated as specified by the semantics. An actual implementation need not evaluate part of an expression if it can deduce that its value is not used and that no needed side effects are produced (including any caused by calling a function or accessing a volatile object).

This mentions expressions, not statements, so it's not 100% convincing, but it certainly allows calls like:

void loop(void){ loop(); }

int main()
{
    loop();
}

to be skipped. Interestingly, clang does skip it, and gcc doesn't.

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  • "This doesn't say anything about what happens if the criteria aren't satisfied" But it does, 6.8.5.1 The while statement: "The evaluation of the controlling expression takes place before each execution of the loop body." That's it. This is a value computation (of a constant expression), it falls under the rule of the abstract machine 5.1.2.3 that defines the term evaluation: "Evaluation of an expression in general includes both value computations and initiation of side effects." And according to the same chapter, all such evaluations are sequenced and evaluated as specified by the semantics. – Lundin Jan 27 at 11:57
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    @Lundin So while(1){} is an infinite sequence of 1 evaluations intertwined with {} evaluations, but where in the standard does it say those evaluations need to take nonzero time? The gcc behavior is more useful, I guess, cuz you don't need tricks involving memory access or tricks outside of the language. But I'm not convinced that the standard forbids this optimization in clang. If making while(1){} nonoptimizable is the intention, the standard ought to be explicit about it and infinite looping should be listed as an observable side effect in 5.1.2.3p2. – PSkocik Jan 27 at 12:21
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    I think it is specified, if you treat the 1 condition as a value computation. Execution time does not matter - what matters is what while(A){} B; may not be optimized away entirely, not optimized to B; and not re-sequenced to B; while(A){}. To quote the C11 abstract machine, emphasis mine: "The presence of a sequence point between the evaluation of expressions A and B implies that every value computation and side effect associated with A is sequenced before every value computation and side effect associated with B." The value of A is clearly used (by the loop). – Lundin Jan 27 at 13:00
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    +1 Even though it seems to me like "execution hangs indefinitely without any output" is a "side-effect" in any definition of "side-effect" that makes sense and is useful beyond just the standard in a vacuum, this helps explain the mindset from which it can makes sense to someone. – mtraceur Jan 27 at 20:56
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    Near "optimizing out an infinite loop": It is not entirely clear whether "it" refers to the standard or the compiler - perhaps rephrase? Given "though it probably should" and not "though it probably shouldn't", it is probably the standard that "it" refers to. – Peter Mortensen Jan 29 at 13:22
2

I have been convinced this is just a plain old bug. I leave the my tests below and in particular the reference to the discussion in the standard committee for some reasoning I previously had.


I think this is undefined behavior (see end), and Clang just has one implementation. GCC indeed works as you expect, optimizing out only the unreachable print statement but leaving the loop. Some how Clang is oddly making decisions when combining the in-lining and determining what it can do with the loop.

The behavior is extra weird - it removes the final print, so "seeing" the infinite loop, but then getting rid of the loop as well.

It's even worse as far as I can tell. Removing the inline we get:

die: # @die
.LBB0_1: # =>This Inner Loop Header: Depth=1
  jmp .LBB0_1
main: # @main
  push rax
  mov edi, offset .Lstr
  call puts
.Lstr:
  .asciz "begin"

so the function is created, and the call optimized out. This is even more resilient than expected:

#include <stdio.h>

void die(int x) {
    while(x);
}

int main() {
    printf("begin\n");
    die(1);
    printf("unreachable\n");
}

results in a very non-optimal assembly for the function, but the function call is again optimized out! Even worse:

void die(x) {
    while(x++);
}

int main() {
    printf("begin\n");
    die(1);
    printf("unreachable\n");
}

I made a bunch of other test with adding a local variable and increasing it, passing a pointer, using a goto etc... At this point I would give up. If you must use clang

static void die() {
    int volatile x = 1;
    while(x);
}

does the job. It sucks at optimizing (obviously), and leaves in the redundant final printf. At least the program does not halt. Maybe GCC after all?

Addendum

Following discussion with David, I yield that the standard does not say "if the condition is constant, you may not assume the loop terminates". As such, and granted under the standard there is no observable behavior (as defined in the standard), I would argue only for consistency - if a compiler is optimizing out a loop because it assume it terminates, it should not optimize out following statements.

Heck n1528 has these as undefined behavior if I read that right. Specifically

A major issue for doing so is that it allows code to move across a potentially non-terminating loop

From here I think it can only devolve into a discussion of what we want (expected?) rather than what is allowed.

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2

It seems that this is a bug in the Clang compiler. If there isn't any compulsion on the die() function to be a static function, do away with static and make it inline:

#include <stdio.h>

inline void die(void) {
    while(1)
        ;
}

int main(void) {
    printf("begin\n");
    die();
    printf("unreachable\n");
}

It's working as expected when compiled with the Clang compiler and is portable as well.

Compiler Explorer (godbolt.org) - clang 9.0.0 -O3 -std=c11 -pedantic-errors

main:                                   # @main
        push    rax
        mov     edi, offset .Lstr
        call    puts
.LBB0_1:                                # =>This Inner Loop Header: Depth=1
        jmp     .LBB0_1
.Lstr:
        .asciz  "begin"
| improve this answer | |
  • What about static inline? – S.S. Anne Feb 21 at 3:05
1

The following appears to work for me:

#include <stdio.h>

__attribute__ ((optnone))
static void die(void) {
    while (1) ;
}

int main(void) {
    printf("begin\n");
    die();
    printf("unreachable\n");
}

at godbolt

Explicitly telling Clang not to optimize that one function causes an infinite loop to be emitted as expected. Hopefully there's a way to selectively disable particular optimizations instead of just turning them all off like that. Clang still refuses to emit code for the second printf, though. To force it to do that, I had to further modify the code inside main to:

volatile int x = 0;
if (x == 0)
    die();

It looks like you'll need to disable optimizations for your infinite loop function, then ensure that your infinite loop is called conditionally. In the real world, the latter is almost always the case anyway.

| improve this answer | |
  • 1
    It's not necessary for the second printf to be generated if the loop actually does go forever, because in that case the second printf really is unreachable and therefore can be deleted. (Clang's error is in both detecting unreachability and then deleting the loop such that the unreachable code is reached). – nneonneo Jan 28 at 0:29
  • GCC documents __attribute__ ((optimize(1))), but clang ignores it as unsupported: godbolt.org/z/4ba2HM. gcc.gnu.org/onlinedocs/gcc/Common-Function-Attributes.html – Peter Cordes Jan 28 at 2:33
0

A conforming implementation may, and many practical ones do, impose arbitrary limits on how long a program may execute or how many instructions it would execute, and behave in arbitrary fashion if those limits are violated or--under the "as-if" rule--if it determines that they will inevitably be violated. Provided that an implementation can successfully process at least one program that nominally exercises all the limits listed in N1570 5.2.4.1 without hitting any translation limits, the existence of limits, the extent to which they are documented, and the effects of exceeding them, are all Quality of Implementation issues outside the jurisdiction of the Standard.

I think the intention of the Standard is quite clear that compilers shouldn't assume that a while(1) {} loop with no side-effects nor break statements will terminate. Contrary to what some people might think, the authors of the Standard were not inviting compiler writers to be stupid or obtuse. A conforming implementation might usefully to decide to terminate any program which would, if not interrupted, execute more side-effect free instructions than there are atoms in the universe, but a quality implementation shouldn't perform such action on the basis of any assumption about termination but rather on the basis that doing so could be useful, and wouldn't (unlike clang's behavior) be worse than useless.

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-2

The loop has no side-effects, and so can be optimized out. The loop is effectively an infinite number of iterations of zero units of work. This is undefined in mathematics and in logic and the standard doesn't say whether an implementation is permitted to complete an infinite number of things if each thing can be done in zero time. Clang's interpretation is perfectly reasonable in treating infinity times zero as zero rather than infinity. The standard doesn't say whether or not an infinite loop can end if all the work in the loops is in fact completed.

The compiler is permitted to optimize out anything that's not observable behavior as defined in the standard. That includes execution time. It is not required to preserve the fact that the loop, if not optimized, would take an infinite amount of time. It is permitted to change that to a much shorter run time -- in fact, that the point of most optimizations. Your loop was optimized.

Even if clang translated the code naively, you could imagine an optimizing CPU that can complete each iteration in half the time the previous iteration took. That would literally complete the infinite loop in a finite amount of time. Does such an optimizing CPU violate the standard? It seems quite absurd to say that an optimizing CPU would violate the standard if it's too good at optimizing. The same is true of a compiler.

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  • Comments are not for extended discussion; this conversation has been moved to chat. – Samuel Liew Jan 27 at 15:47
  • 4
    Judging from the experience you have (from your profile) I can only conclude that this post is written in bad faith just to defend the compiler. You're seriously arguing that something that takes an infinite amount of time can be optimized to execute in half the time. That is ridiculous on every level and you know that. – pipe Jan 29 at 18:40
  • @pipe: I think the maintainers of clang and gcc are hoping a future version of the Standard will make their compilers' behavior permissible, and the maintainers of those compilers will be able to pretend that such a change was merely a correction of a longstanding defect in the Standard. That's how they've treated C89's Common Initial Sequence guarantees, for example. – supercat Jan 29 at 20:08
  • @S.S.Anne: Hmm... I don't think that's sufficient to block some of the unsound inferences gcc and clang draw from the results of pointer-equality comparisons. – supercat Feb 21 at 16:23
  • @supercat There are <s>others</s> tons. – S.S. Anne Feb 21 at 16:23
-2

I'm sorry if this is absurdly not the case, I stumbled upon this post and I know because my years using Gentoo Linux distro that if you want the compiler to not optimize your code you should use -O0(Zero). I was curious about it, and compiled and ran the above code, and the loop do goes indefinitely. Compiled using clang-9:

cc -O0 -std=c11 test.c -o test
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  • 1
    The point is to make an infinite loop with optimizations enabled. – S.S. Anne Feb 21 at 2:59
-4

An empty while loop doesn't have any side effects on the system.

Therefore Clang removes it. There are "better" ways to achieve the intended behavior that force you to be more obvious of your intentions.

while(1); is baaadd.

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  • 7
    In many embedded constructs, there is no concept of abort() or exit(). If a situation arises where a function determines that (perhaps as a result of memory corruption) continued execution would be worse than dangerous, a common default behavior for embedded libraries is to invoke a function that performs a while(1);. It may be useful for compiler to have options to substitute a more useful behavior, but any compiler writer who can't figure out how to treat such a simple construct as a barrier to continued program execution is incompetent to be trusted with complex optimizations. – supercat Jan 29 at 19:49
  • 1
    Is there a way you can be more explicit of your intentions? the optimizer is there to optimize your program, and a remove redundant loops that don't do anything IS an optimization. this is really a philosophical difference between the abstract thinking of the math world and the more applied engineering world. – Famous Jameis Jan 30 at 17:30
  • 1
    Most programs have a set of useful actions they should perform when possible, and a set of worse-than-useless actions they must never perform under any circumstances. Many programs have a set of acceptable behaviors in any particular case, one of which, if execution time is not observable, would always be "wait some arbitrary and then perform some an action from the set". If all actions other than waiting are in the set of worse-than-useless actions, there would be no number of seconds N for which "wait forever" would be observably different from... – supercat Jan 30 at 17:55
  • 1
    ..."wait N+1 seconds and then perform some other action", so the fact that the set of tolerable actions other than waiting is empty would not be observable. On the other hand, if a piece of code removes some intolerable action from the set of possible actions, and one of those actions gets performed anyway, that should be considered observable. Unfortunately, C and C++ language rules use the word "assume" in a weird way unlike any other field of logic or human endeavor I can identify. – supercat Jan 30 at 18:04
  • 1
    @FamousJameis ok, but Clang doesn't just remove the loop - it statically analyzes everything afterwards as unreachable and emits an invalid instruction. That's not at what you expect if it just "removed" the loop. – nneonneo Feb 14 at 17:49

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