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When you do something like "test" in a where a is a list does python do a sequential search on the list or does it create a hash table representation to optimize the lookup? In the application I need this for I'll be doing a lot of lookups on the list so would it be best to do something like b = set(a) and then "test" in b? Also note that the list of values I'll have won't have duplicate data and I don't actually care about the order it's in; I just need to be able to check for the existence of a value.

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Also note that the list of values I'll have won't have duplicate data and I don't actually care about the order it's in; I just need to be able to check for the existence of a value.

Don't use a list, use a set() instead. It has exactly the properties you want, including a blazing fast in test.

I've seen speedups of 20x and higher in places (mostly heavy number crunching) where one list was changed for a set.

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  • 1
    @blcArmadillo: `set's are the way to go since you don't have duplicate data and don't care about order -- plus you can always enumerate the members of the set or quickly turn it into a list if needed.
    – martineau
    May 13 '11 at 15:14
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    I used this and it spend things up immensely. Thank you.
    – Josh Usre
    Aug 27 '15 at 22:11
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    Wow, I had a dumb script brute forcing through two files to find similar lines, and this just cut the time down from ~20 min to under 1. Thanks!
    – Parker
    Oct 29 '15 at 22:18
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    With a very large list and almost ~2 million checks the compute time came down from 3 hours to < 1 min !!!!
    – vin
    Apr 30 '17 at 6:58
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"test" in a with a list a will do a linear search. Setting up a hash table on the fly would be much more expensive than a linear search. "test" in b on the other hand will do an amoirtised O(1) hash look-up.

In the case you describe, there doesn't seem to be a reason to use a list over a set.

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  • This is only true if there are many many lookups done on b after it's constructed. If b needs to be (re)constructed every time a lookup is performed, then "test" in b will be slower, since the construction of the set would not be linear.
    – Jamie Wong
    May 13 '11 at 14:55
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    @Jamie: From the OP: "In the application I need this for I'll be doing a lot of lookups on the list [...]". Seems like there are many lookups. May 13 '11 at 14:58
  • I agree it's the right solution - just trying to make it clear.
    – Jamie Wong
    May 13 '11 at 15:01
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I think it would be better to go with the set implementation. I know for a fact that sets have O(1) lookup time. I think lists take O(n) lookup time. But even if lists are also O(1) lookup, you lose nothing with switching to sets.

Further, sets don't allow duplicate values. This will make your program slightly more memory efficient as well

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List and tuples seems to have the same time, and using "in" is slow for large data:

>>> t = list(range(0, 1000000))
>>> a=time.time();x = [b in t for b in range(100234,101234)];print(time.time()-a)
1.66235494614
>>> t = tuple(range(0, 1000000))
>>> a=time.time();x = [b in t for b in range(100234,101234)];print(time.time()-a)
1.6594209671

Here is much better solution: Most efficient way for a lookup/search in a huge list (python)

It's super fast:

>>> from bisect import bisect_left
>>> t = list(range(0, 1000000))
>>> a=time.time();x = [t[bisect_left(t,b)]==b for b in range(100234,101234)];print(time.time()-a)
0.0054759979248
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