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I want to write a parser. It seems practical to me to have a mutable Iterator that I can pass around to different parser functions.

I've tried to illustrated a simplified approach, which compiles but is not ideal yet.

fn main() {
    let tokens = vec!["fIrSt".to_string(), "SeConD".to_string(), "tHiRd".to_string(), "FoUrTh".to_string()];

    let parsed = parse_input(tokens);

    println!("{}", parsed);
}

fn parse_input(tokens: Vec<String>) -> String {
    let mut tokens_iter = tokens.iter();

    let upps = parse_upper(&mut tokens_iter);
    let lowers = parse_lower(&mut tokens_iter);

    upps + &lowers
}

fn parse_upper(tokens_iter: &mut Iterator<Item=&String>) -> String {
    let mut result = String::new();
    let token_1 = tokens_iter.next().unwrap().to_uppercase();
    let token_2 = tokens_iter.next().unwrap().to_uppercase();
    result.push_str(&token_1);
    result.push_str(&token_2);
    result
}

fn parse_lower(tokens_iter: &mut Iterator<Item=&String>) -> String {
    let mut result = String::new();
    let token_1 = tokens_iter.next().unwrap().to_lowercase();
    let token_2 = tokens_iter.next().unwrap().to_lowercase();
    result.push_str(&token_1);
    result.push_str(&token_2);
    result
}

How the example works: Let's say I have some input, that has already been tokenized. Here it is represented by the tokens vector (Vec<String>). Inside the outer parse_input function, the Vec gets transformed into an Iterator and then passed into different, specific parser functions. Here: parse_upper and parse_lower. In real life those could be "parse_if_statement" or "parse_while_loop" but which part of the Iterator gets worked on is not relevant for the question. What is relevant is, that every call to next advances the cursor on the Iterator. So that every function consumes the pieces it needs. This example compiles and gives the output: FIRSTSECONDthirdfourth

I would like to be able to peek() into the Iterator, before I pass it to a function. This is necessary to determine which function should actually be called. But everything I have tried with using a Peekable instead of an Iterator resulted in total lifetime and borrow chaos.

Any suggestions on how to pass a Peekable instead of an Iterator in this case?

Maybe using a Peekable as function parameter is a bad idea in the first place. Or maybe my Iterator approach is already wrong. All suggestions/hints are welcome.

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    If you're going to do a full-feature lexer/parser, just use a lib like nom. – Boiethios Jan 28 at 10:14
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    Why do you think this is a chaos ? play.rust-lang.org/… , Simply you are telling that item in the iterator lives where the function gets called. – Ömer Erden Jan 28 at 10:17
  • 1
    @ÖmerErden Thank you very much! This is exactly what I was looking for, but couldn't quite work out. Lack of knowledge around generics and lifetimes on my end. – niilz Jan 28 at 19:24
  • 1
    @niilz Ah ok! Usually, after you've lexed your code, you don't have owned strings, but slices. You're then allowed to "peek" them as much as you want. – Boiethios Jan 29 at 8:29

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