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According to https://en.cppreference.com/w/cpp/language/injected-class-name

In a class scope, the name of the current class is treated as if it were a public member name; this is called injected-class-name. The point of declaration of the name is immediately following the opening brace of the class definition.

int X;
struct X {
    void f() {
        X* p; // OK. X refers to the injected-class-name
        ::X* q; // Error: name lookup finds a variable name, which hides the struct name
    }
};

So what is really happening in the code? Is X* p turned into X::X* p?

2 Answers 2

6

So what is really happening in the code? Is X* p turned into X::X* p?

Basically. The name lookup rules start in the narrowest scope. When you do X* p; in f is looks in f's scope and doesn't find anything. Then it checks X's scope since f is scoped to X. It finds X since it is injected into the class scope so it stops there and you get the class type.

When you do ::X* q; then ::X says look for X in the global namespace, and there is finds a variable, not a type so you get an error.

8
  • So the reason why something like X::X::foo can occur (something like: stackoverflow.com/questions/46805449/…) is because Injected-Class-Name ignores those scope lookups and simply does X::foo?
    – csguy
    Commented Jan 28, 2020 at 20:09
  • @csguy It doesn't ignore it per se, it's just that X:: contains X and f in this case. X because it is injected via the compiler and f because you defined it. If you do X::X then your right back to where you started and again have X and f as valid names. Make sense? Commented Jan 28, 2020 at 20:11
  • Oh I see. X is injected because it's not stated as some member name because it's just the class name?
    – csguy
    Commented Jan 28, 2020 at 20:14
  • 1
    Yes. If the name were not injected then class_name::class_name would no be valid (constructors are not accessible) Commented Jan 28, 2020 at 20:17
  • 1
    @csguy Yep. Isn't C++ fun? ;) Commented Jan 28, 2020 at 20:37
4

This qualified name ::X is searched in the global namespace. As there is no type with such a name (the variable declaration hides the type struct X) the compiler issues an error.

You could use an elaborated name like

int X;
struct X {
    void f() {
        X* p; // OK. X refers to the injected-class-name
        struct ::X* q; // OK. elaborated name struct ::X
    }
};
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