15

The new Azure Function 3.0 SDK provides a way to implement a Startup class. It gives access to the collection of services that are available by dependency injection, where I can add my own components and third-party services.

But I don't know how to use a configuration file.

[assembly: FunctionsStartup(typeof(MyNamespace.Startup))]
namespace MyNamespace
{
    public class Startup : FunctionsStartup
    {
        public override void Configure(IFunctionsHostBuilder builder)
        {
...

My third party services take large structures as parameter, and those configuration files are copied with binaries. I can copy them in a subsection of an appsettings.json file:

{
  "MachineLearningConfig" : {
     ( about 50+ parameters and subsections )
  }
}

Configuration values are updated according to the environment of deployment . I use Azure Devops's File Transform Task for that: production values are different from staging and dev values.

Given the documentation https://docs.microsoft.com/en-us/azure/azure-functions/functions-dotnet-dependency-injection the way to load those options is:

builder.Services.AddOptions<MachineLearningConfig>()
                .Configure<IConfiguration>((settings, configuration) =>
                                           {
                                                configuration.GetSection("MachineLearningConfig").Bind(settings);
                                           });

But that requires to add all settings as key/value strings in the host's environment, and that is what I do not want to do. There are too many of them and that is not as easy to maintain as in a json configuration file.

I copied that appsettings.json alongside the host.json.

But the appsettings.json file read at startup by the Azure Function SDK is not my application's appsettings.json but Azure Function tools's appsettings.json. So configuration.GetSection("MachineLearningConfig") returns empty values as there is no appsettings.json file in the Azure Function tools bin folder.

So, my question: how to have my MachineLearningConfig section read from my appsetting.json file injected as IOption<MachineLearningConfig> in my app ?

4
  • Have you considered creating a custom configuration provider docs.microsoft.com/en-us/aspnet/core/fundamentals/configuration/…
    – Nkosi
    Feb 3, 2020 at 11:54
  • Some clarification is needed on where those 3rd party configurations are located.
    – Nkosi
    Feb 3, 2020 at 12:09
  • Nkosi, like any asp.net core service, the appsetting.json file is joined at the root in the deployed package. At compile time for debugging it is copied in the bin/Debug directory. Feb 3, 2020 at 13:52
  • Then in that case you will need to create a new configuration. load the original configuration into it and then add the other settings. build that configuration and replace the root config in the DI container.
    – Nkosi
    Feb 3, 2020 at 14:13

7 Answers 7

13

In Azure Functions v3 you can use the appsettings.json configuration pattern from ASP.NET-Core with the ConfigureAppConfiguration call below (reference).

Additionally, change the way you add your options by using the code within the Configure method below. You should not be passing IConfiguration to IServiceProvider.Configure<>(). This will allow you to use an injected IOptions<MachineLearningConfig> object.

using Microsoft.Azure.Functions.Extensions.DependencyInjection;
using Microsoft.Extensions.Configuration;
using Microsoft.Extensions.DependencyInjection;
using System;
using System.IO;

[assembly: FunctionsStartup(typeof(Startup))]

namespace MyAzureFunction
{
    public class Startup : FunctionsStartup
    {
        public override void ConfigureAppConfiguration(IFunctionsConfigurationBuilder builder)
        {
            if (builder == null) throw new ArgumentNullException(nameof(builder));

            var context = builder.GetContext();

            builder.ConfigurationBuilder
                .AddAppsettingsFile(context)
                .AddAppsettingsFile(context, useEnvironment: true)
                .AddEnvironmentVariables();
        }

        public override void Configure(IFunctionsHostBuilder builder)
        {
            if (builder == null) throw new ArgumentNullException(nameof(builder));

            var configuration = builder.GetContext().Configuration;

            builder.Services.Configure<MachineLearningConfig>(options =>
            {
                configuration.GetSection("MachineLearningConfig").bind(options);
            });
        }
    }

    public static class ConfigurationBuilderExtensions
    {
        public static IConfigurationBuilder AddAppsettingsFile(
            this IConfigurationBuilder configurationBuilder,
            FunctionsHostBuilderContext context,
            bool useEnvironment = false
        )
        {
            if (context == null) throw new ArgumentNullException(nameof(context));

            var environmentSection = string.Empty;

            if (useEnvironment)
            {
                environmentSection = $".{context.EnvironmentName}";
            }

            configurationBuilder.AddJsonFile(
                path: Path.Combine(context.ApplicationRootPath, $"appsettings{environmentSection}.json"),
                optional: true,
                reloadOnChange: false);

            return configurationBuilder;
        }
    }
}
7
  • Do you know how this works with dotnet 5 + functions v3? As far as I'm aware this technique of inheriting from FunctionsStartup has been deprecated
    – NickL
    Sep 1, 2021 at 12:26
  • Sorry @NickL I don't know. I'm hoping they implemented appsettings.<environment>.json out of the box though (or something similar), but I haven't had the chance to look into dotnet 5 yet.
    – Daniel
    Sep 1, 2021 at 19:50
  • Why should one add this code if one can just add the local file to the sln for local development or keys to the azure func configurations and use System.Environment.GetEnvironmentVariable("keyName") ? Getting an env var sounds much easier and also saves you the trouble of passing this config var everywhere Apr 8 at 21:28
  • @YonatanNir There are a few use-cases for this. For example, 1) it may be easier to generate this environment specific configuration file as part of the pipeline instead of setting environment variables. 2) if you need to dynamically update settings on an environment which is already deployed (I wouldn't personally do this one but have seen it in the past) you'd just need to update the file. I don't understand what you mean by config var? The config var is an env var.
    – Daniel
    Apr 8 at 21:56
  • @YonatanNir Additionally, If you have a lot of variables and some don't change very often, it makes sense to store a lot of them via these files. With the above code any setting from the file can be overwritten by an env var as well. So you can store many of the settings in some of these files, using environment variables to override some of the more dynamic ones. Can this be done by adding the file to the sln? Not when I originally wrote this answer. But don't confuse this with ASP.NET-Core which had support for these files out of the box.
    – Daniel
    Apr 8 at 22:01
8

Nkosi's solution works pretty well, but it does update the way the azure function runtime loads settings for itself, by replacing IConfiguration singleton: services.AddSingleton<IConfiguration>.

I prefer having another IConfigurationRoot that is not injected. I just need to inject my settings IOption<MachineLearningSettings> that are linked to my own IConfigurationRoot.

I build another IConfigurationRoot that is member of the Startup class:

public class Startup : FunctionsStartup
{
    private IConfigurationRoot _functionConfig = null;

    private IConfigurationRoot FunctionConfig( string appDir ) => 
        _functionConfig ??= new ConfigurationBuilder()
            .AddJsonFile(Path.Combine(appDir, "appsettings.json"), optional: true, reloadOnChange: true)
            .Build();

    public override void Configure(IFunctionsHostBuilder builder)
    {
         builder.Services.AddOptions<MachineLearningSettings>()
             .Configure<IOptions<ExecutionContextOptions>>((mlSettings, exeContext) =>
                 FunctionConfig(exeContext.Value.AppDirectory).GetSection("MachineLearningSettings").Bind(mlSettings) );
    }
}

Note: connection strings must remain in the application settings, because it is required by triggers to create an instance of the the function app that is not started (in a consumption service plan).

8
  • 1
    The ExecutionContextOptions is the key here in finding the correct location to load the settings. Yes this approach is less invasive that my suggested approach and less likely to break default configuration. Good going. Happy coding!!!.
    – Nkosi
    Feb 6, 2020 at 11:06
  • Do note that although the original settings IConfiguration is replaced, it was merged into the replacement so that nothing is lost or overridden.
    – Nkosi
    Feb 6, 2020 at 11:47
  • Yes, otherwise trigger's connectionstrings in environment would not be taken into account and it would'nt work. Feb 7, 2020 at 23:03
  • @AnthonyBrenelière Is there a way to merge default configuration with ours, while preserving the Azure runtime loads? Jul 23, 2020 at 18:50
  • 1
    Because you may use libraries that require options that are more complex then what allows the key/string model of environment variables. Apr 9 at 2:41
5

With this .NET Core 3.1 and Azure Function 3. Spent a hours days. Here is what I came up with.

[assembly: FunctionsStartup(typeof(Ugly.AzureFunctions.Startup))]

namespace Ugly.AzureFunctions
{
    class Startup : FunctionsStartup
    {
        public override void ConfigureAppConfiguration(IFunctionsConfigurationBuilder builder)
        {
            try
            {
                // On Azure, we need to get where the app is.
                // If you use Directory.GetCurrentDirectory(), you will get something like D:\Program Files (x86)\SiteExtensions\Functions\3.0.14785\32bit
                var basePath = Path.Combine(Path.GetDirectoryName(Assembly.GetExecutingAssembly().Location), "..");
                var environmentName = builder.GetContext().EnvironmentName;
                builder.ConfigurationBuilder
                    .SetBasePath(basePath)
                    .AddJsonFile("appsettings.json", optional: true, reloadOnChange: true)
                    .AddJsonFile($"appsettings.{environmentName}.json", optional: true, reloadOnChange: true)
                    .AddEnvironmentVariables();
            }
            catch (Exception ex)
            {
                // Handle exceptions about this. Which __should__ never ever happen.
                // The previous comment is sarcastic.
                throw;
            }
        }

        public override void Configure(IFunctionsHostBuilder builder)
        {
            try
            {
                // DO NOT add the configuration as Singleton.
                // If you need the IConfiguration:
                //var configuration = builder.GetContext().Configuration;

                builder.Services
                    .AddOptions<MachineLearningConfig>()
                    .Configure<IConfiguration>((settings, configuration) => {
                        configuration.GetSection("MachineLearningConfig").Bind(settings);
                });
            }
            catch (Exception ex)
            {
                // Handle or not handle? That's the question.
                throw;
            }
        }
    }
}
1
  • Why should one add this code if one can just add the local file to the sln for local development or keys to the azure func configurations and use System.Environment.GetEnvironmentVariable("keyName") ? Getting an env var sounds much easier and also saves you the trouble of passing this config var everywhere Apr 8 at 21:28
4

In the startup class:

    IConfigurationRoot config = new ConfigurationBuilder()
              .SetBasePath(Environment.CurrentDirectory)
              .AddJsonFile("someSettings.json", optional: true, reloadOnChange: true)
              .AddEnvironmentVariables()
              .Build();

Add a json file to you project that holds the settings. Note that local.settings.json is ignored/removed during deployment. (Name the file something else.)

5
  • The current directory does not contain the someSettings.json file at startup, as it points to the azure core tools bin directory. Feb 2, 2020 at 23:02
  • you have to create the file you self Feb 3, 2020 at 7:41
  • 1
    Let me try to simplify the comment above. Create a copy of local.settings.json at the root and name the file someSettings.json. Feb 3, 2020 at 7:53
  • is this working also with local settings json on local machine?
    – zolty13
    Jul 6, 2021 at 11:39
  • Why should one add this code if one can just add the local file to the sln for local development or keys to the azure func configurations and use System.Environment.GetEnvironmentVariable("keyName") ? Getting an env var sounds much easier and also saves you the trouble of passing this config var everywhere Apr 8 at 21:25
4

MS Docs has been updated with configuration samples

Remember to install required libraries listed in Prerequisites seciton.

using System.IO;
using Microsoft.Azure.Functions.Extensions.DependencyInjection;
using Microsoft.Extensions.Configuration;
using Microsoft.Extensions.DependencyInjection;

[assembly: FunctionsStartup(typeof(MyNamespace.Startup))]

namespace MyNamespace
{
    public class Startup : FunctionsStartup
    {
        public override void ConfigureAppConfiguration(IFunctionsConfigurationBuilder builder)
        {
            FunctionsHostBuilderContext context = builder.GetContext();

            builder.ConfigurationBuilder
                .AddJsonFile(Path.Combine(context.ApplicationRootPath, "appsettings.json"), optional: true, reloadOnChange: false)
                .AddJsonFile(Path.Combine(context.ApplicationRootPath, $"appsettings.{context.EnvironmentName}.json"), optional: true, reloadOnChange: false)
                .AddEnvironmentVariables();
        }
    }
}
4
  • Why should one add this code if one can just add the local file to the sln for local development or keys to the azure func configurations and use System.Environment.GetEnvironmentVariable("keyName") ? Getting an env var sounds much easier and also saves you the trouble of passing this config var everywhere Apr 8 at 21:28
  • @YonatanNir If you have your configurations as plain key-value pairs, then what you suggested would be the easiest way to do it. But sometimes you have to load configurations which have a complex structure with nested sections or worse arrays. Then, loading it off a JSON into a typed object makes more sense. This let's you do that. Jun 29 at 14:36
  • @ΕГИІИО But you can also save the values to the configurations as a JSON string Jun 29 at 17:43
  • @YonatanNir Yeah, it's a matter of preference I guess. It's not intuitive to edit a value inside an escaped JSON string, but then you get the advantage of having everything in one place :) Jun 30 at 5:31
2
+300

After some research, I came across this thread on Githib

using appsettings.json + IConfiguration in Function App

From which I crafted the following extension based on the comments and suggestions that showed to have worked.

public static class FunctionHostBuilderExtensions {
    /// <summary>
    /// Set up the configuration for the builder itself. This replaces the 
    /// currently registered configuration with additional custom configuration.
    /// This can be called multiple times and the results will be additive.
    /// </summary>
    public static IFunctionsHostBuilder ConfigureHostConfiguration (
        this IFunctionsHostBuilder builder, 
        Action<IServiceProvider, IConfigurationBuilder> configureDelegate) {
        IServiceCollection services = builder.Services;            
        var providers = new List<IConfigurationProvider>();            
        //Cache all current configuration provider
        foreach (var descriptor in services.Where(d => d.ServiceType == typeof(IConfiguration)).ToList()) {
            var existingConfiguration = descriptor.ImplementationInstance as IConfigurationRoot;
            if (existingConfiguration is null) {
                continue;
            }
            providers.AddRange(existingConfiguration.Providers);
            services.Remove(descriptor);
        }
        //add new configuration based on original and newly added configuration
        services.AddSingleton<IConfiguration>(sp => {
            var configurationBuilder = new ConfigurationBuilder();                    
            //call custom configuration
            configureDelegate?.Invoke(sp, configurationBuilder);                
            providers.AddRange(configurationBuilder.Build().Providers);                
            return new ConfigurationRoot(providers);
        });            
        return builder;
    }
}

The main idea is to extract all the currently registered configuration related types, create a new builder, apply custom configuration and build a new configuration with the original and custom configuration details merged into one.

It would then be used in Startup

public class Startup : FunctionsStartup {
    public override void Configure(IFunctionsHostBuilder builder) {
        builder.ConfigureHostConfiguration((sp, config) => {
            var executioncontextoptions = sp.GetService<IOptions<ExecutionContextOptions>>().Value;
            var currentDirectory = executioncontextoptions.AppDirectory;

            config
                .SetBasePath(currentDirectory)
                .AddJsonFile("appSettings.json", optional: true, reloadOnChange: true)
                .AddEnvironmentVariables();

            //if there are multiple settings files, consider extracting the list,
            //enumerating it and adding them to the configuration builder.
        });

        builder.Services
            .AddOptions<MachineLearningConfig>()
            .Configure<IConfiguration>((settings, configuration) => {
                configuration.GetSection("MachineLearningConfig").Bind(settings);
            });
    }
}

The above should now be able to get the settings from your custom configuration.

3
  • That is the way. The issue with that solution is that it replaces the azure function runtime 's configuration with services.AddSingleton<IConfiguration> . In the meantime I found a way that does not require it. Feb 6, 2020 at 9:33
  • This no longer works in Azure Functions v3 (.NET Core 3+) because the ImplementationInstance property is null for the type IConfiguration in IServiceCollection. Aug 11, 2020 at 14:55
  • 3
    It is unacceptable how overly complex this mechanism is. Oct 18, 2020 at 20:59
0

When you develop a function app locally, you must maintain local copies of these values in the local.settings.json project file. To learn more, see Local settings file.

The easiest way to upload the required settings to your function app in Azure is to use the Manage Application Settings... link that is displayed after you successfully publish your project.

Refer this example on how to get those setting values.

var config = new ConfigurationBuilder()
                .SetBasePath(currentDirectory)
                .AddJsonFile("local.settings.json", optional: true, reloadOnChange: true)
                .AddEnvironmentVariables()
                .Build();

here is a sample project

2
  • As I said I do not want to use application settings (or the environment variables) because they are limited to key/values and not purposed to store large structured settings. I use application settings for some connection strings only. Feb 2, 2020 at 22:56
  • Why should one add this code if one can just add the local file to the sln for local development or keys to the azure func configurations and use System.Environment.GetEnvironmentVariable("keyName") ? Getting an env var sounds much easier and also saves you the trouble of passing this config var everywhere Apr 8 at 21:25

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