9

I have a SwiftUI app that will have a floating podcast player, similar to the Apple Music player that sits just above the Tab Bar and persists across all tabs and views while the player is running. I have not figured out a good way to position the player so that it is flush above the Tab Bar, since the Tab Bar height changes based on device. The main issue I've found is just how I have to position the player in an overlay or ZStack in the root view of my app, instead of within the TabView itself. Since we can't customize the view hierarchy of the TabView layout, there is no way to inject a view in-between the TabBar itself and the content of the view above it. My basic code structure:

TabView(selection: $appState.selectedTab){
  Home()
  .tabItem {
    VStack {
        Image(systemName: "house")
        Text("Home")
    }
  }
  ...
}.overlay(
  VStack {
    if(audioPlayer.isShowing) {
      Spacer()
      PlayerContainerView(player: audioPlayer.player)
      .padding(.bottom, 58)
      .transition(.moveAndFade)
    }
  })

The main issue here is that the location of the PlayerContainerView is hard-coded with a padding of 58 so that it clears the TabView. If I could detect the actual frame height of the TabView, I could globally adjust this for the given device and I would be fine. Does anybody know how to do this reliably? Or do you have any idea how I could place the PlayerContainerView within the TabView itself so that it simply appears BETWEEN the Home() view and the Tab Bar when it is toggled to show? Any feedback would be appreciated.

3
  • did you try with GeometryReader?
    – Chris
    Jan 29, 2020 at 15:10
  • Yes, but I could not figure out how to target the TabView...or at least I was unable to find a relevant height value that actually corresponds to the drawn height of the tab bar for that specific device. Jan 29, 2020 at 15:33
  • @eResourcesInc I tried it, you can see how it works in my answer ... Feb 9, 2020 at 15:51

6 Answers 6

13

As bridge to UIKit is officially allowed and documented, it is possible to read needed information from there when needed.

Here is possible approach to read tab bar height directly from UITabBar

// Helper bridge to UIViewController to access enclosing UITabBarController
// and thus its UITabBar
struct TabBarAccessor: UIViewControllerRepresentable {
    var callback: (UITabBar) -> Void
    private let proxyController = ViewController()

    func makeUIViewController(context: UIViewControllerRepresentableContext<TabBarAccessor>) ->
                              UIViewController {
        proxyController.callback = callback
        return proxyController
    }
    
    func updateUIViewController(_ uiViewController: UIViewController, context: UIViewControllerRepresentableContext<TabBarAccessor>) {
    }
    
    typealias UIViewControllerType = UIViewController

    private class ViewController: UIViewController {
        var callback: (UITabBar) -> Void = { _ in }

        override func viewWillAppear(_ animated: Bool) {
            super.viewWillAppear(animated)
            if let tabBar = self.tabBarController {
                self.callback(tabBar.tabBar)
            }
        }
    }
}

// Demo SwiftUI view of usage
struct TestTabBar: View {
    var body: some View {
        TabView {
            Text("First View")
                .background(TabBarAccessor { tabBar in
                    print(">> TabBar height: \(tabBar.bounds.height)")
                    // !! use as needed, in calculations, @State, etc.
                })
                .tabItem { Image(systemName: "1.circle") }
                .tag(0)
            Text("Second View")
                .tabItem { Image(systemName: "2.circle") }
                .tag(1)
        }
    }
}
8
  • 1
    This works, however the value it gives me is 83 for an iPhone 11 Max Pro. The actual distance (in padding, at least) is 60 pixels. I think that your solution gives me the distance to the edge, plus the unsafe area, or something like that. The problem is that I have to space things in the app based on SwiftUI's bounds, which means I can't use this exact calculation unless I know the device specific difference between safe area and non-safe area. In this case it's 23 pixels, but in other cases it varies. Any thoughts how to deal with that? Jan 30, 2020 at 15:25
  • Adding to that, if you programmatically compute the safe area insets for this same device, the value given is 34. However, 83 - 34 does not equal 60. So I just continue to have no idea how to actually get that number programmatically, although your answer does answer my question as stated. Jan 30, 2020 at 15:34
  • Yes, I've been a little bit sceptic at the beginning. It took some time but I found usable solution, which works on all devices and orientations. If you like to do, see the solution in my answer. Feb 9, 2020 at 15:55
  • @eResourcesInc the solution exists, see my answer (even though i am late with it) Feb 9, 2020 at 17:20
  • For some reason when is used in iPadOS it makes tabbar disappear (being transparent) Mar 8, 2021 at 21:34
8

It seems, that you need to know the maximal size of player (size of space above tab bar), not height of tab bar self.

Using GeometryReader and PreferenceKey are the handy tool for that

import Combine

struct Size: PreferenceKey {

    typealias Value = [CGRect]
    static var defaultValue: [CGRect] = []
    static func reduce(value: inout [CGRect], nextValue: () -> [CGRect]) {
        value.append(contentsOf: nextValue())
    }
}

struct HomeView: View {
    let txt: String
    var body: some View {
        GeometryReader { proxy in
            Text(self.txt).preference(key: Size.self, value: [proxy.frame(in: CoordinateSpace.global)])
        }
    }
}


struct ContentView: View {
    @State var playerFrame = CGRect.zero
    var body: some View {

        TabView {
            HomeView(txt: "Hello").tabItem {
                Image(systemName: "house")
                Text("A")
            }.border(Color.green).tag(1)

            HomeView(txt: "World!").tabItem {
                Image(systemName: "house")
                Text("B")
            }.border(Color.red).tag(2)

            HomeView(txt: "Bla bla").tabItem {
                Image(systemName: "house")
                Text("C")
            }.border(Color.blue).tag(3)
        }
        .onPreferenceChange(Size.self, perform: { (v) in
            self.playerFrame = v.last ?? .zero
            print(self.playerFrame)
        })
            .overlay(
                Color.yellow.opacity(0.2)
            .frame(width: playerFrame.width, height: playerFrame.height)
            .position(x: playerFrame.width / 2, y: playerFrame.height / 2)
        )
    }
}

struct ContentView_Previews: PreviewProvider {
    static var previews: some View {
        ContentView()
    }
}

In the example I reduce the size with .padding() on yellow transparent rectangle, to be sure no part could be hidden (out of screen)

enter image description here

Even the height of tab bar could be calculated, if necessary, but I am not able to imagine for what.

4
  • This is a great approach to solve the inverse part of the equation, which could be very useful. I've used the above answer to "solve" my problem in the short term, but this looks like a great, robust way to handle this for future tasks.. Feb 19, 2020 at 14:11
  • How to read the Size struct in another View? Jan 24, 2021 at 11:50
  • Why is v.last is nil in my testing?
    – Joe Huang
    Apr 7, 2021 at 4:06
  • 1
    But how do you get the distance from the bottom of the screen to the top of TabBar? Jul 29 at 23:09
3

Expanding upon the answer from user3441734, you should be able to use this Size to get the difference between TabView and content view sizes. That difference is then the offset where the player needs to be positioned. Here is a rewritten version that should work:

import SwiftUI

struct InnerContentSize: PreferenceKey {
  typealias Value = [CGRect]

  static var defaultValue: [CGRect] = []
  static func reduce(value: inout [CGRect], nextValue: () -> [CGRect]) {
    value.append(contentsOf: nextValue())
  }
}

struct HomeView: View {
  let txt: String
  var body: some View {
    GeometryReader { proxy in
      Text(self.txt)
        .preference(key: InnerContentSize.self, value: [proxy.frame(in: CoordinateSpace.global)])
    }
  }
}

struct PlayerView: View {
  var playerOffset: CGFloat

  var body: some View {
    VStack(alignment: .leading) {
      Spacer()
      HStack {
        Rectangle()
          .fill(Color.blue)
          .frame(width: 55, height: 55)
          .cornerRadius(8.0)
        Text("Name of really cool song")
        Spacer()
        Image(systemName: "play.circle")
          .font(.title)
      }
      .padding(.horizontal)
      Spacer()
    }
    .background(Color.pink.opacity(0.2))
    .frame(height: 70)
    .offset(y: -playerOffset)
  }
}

struct ContentView: View {
  @State private var playerOffset: CGFloat = 0

  var body: some View {
    GeometryReader { geometry in
      TabView {
        HomeView(txt: "Foo")
          .tag(0)
          .tabItem {
            Image(systemName: "sun.min")
            Text("Sun")
          }

        HomeView(txt: "Bar")
          .tag(1)
          .tabItem {
            Image(systemName: "moon")
            Text("Moon")
          }

        HomeView(txt: "Baz")
          .tag(2)
          .tabItem {
            Image(systemName: "sparkles")
            Text("Stars")
          }
      }
      .ignoresSafeArea()
      .onPreferenceChange(InnerContentSize.self, perform: { value in
        self.playerOffset = geometry.size.height - (value.last?.height ?? 0)
      })
      .overlay(PlayerView(playerOffset: playerOffset), alignment: .bottom)
    }
  }
}

struct ContentView_Previews: PreviewProvider {
  static var previews: some View {
    ContentView()
  }
}

Mini Player

0
3

hope I'm not too late to help. The following code is my take on the problem. It works with all devices and also updates the height with device rotation for portrait and landscape.

struct TabBarHeighOffsetViewModifier: ViewModifier {
    let action: (CGFloat) -> Void
//MARK: this screenSafeArea helps determine the correct tab bar height depending on device version
    private let screenSafeArea = (UIApplication.shared.windows.first { $0.isKeyWindow }?.safeAreaInsets.bottom ?? 34)

func body(content: Content) -> some View {
    GeometryReader { proxy in
        content
            .onAppear {
                    let offset = proxy.safeAreaInsets.bottom - screenSafeArea
                    action(offset)
            }
            .onReceive(NotificationCenter.default.publisher(for: UIDevice.orientationDidChangeNotification)) { _ in
                    let offset = proxy.safeAreaInsets.bottom - screenSafeArea
                    action(offset)
            }
        }
    }
}

extension View {
    func tabBarHeightOffset(perform action: @escaping (CGFloat) -> Void) -> some View {
        modifier(TabBarHeighOffsetViewModifier(action: action))
    }
}

struct MainTabView: View {

    var body: some View {
        TabView {
            Text("Add the extension on subviews of tabview")
                .tabBarHeightOffset { offset in
                    print("the offset of tabview is -\(offset)")
                }
        }
    }
}

The offset can be applied to views to hover over the tabbar.

1
  • But screenSafeAreawill never be updated because it is a let? Aug 1 at 8:37
1

@Asperi 's answer works but unfortunately does not support device orientation changes + there is an issue with the offset.

Here is what needs to change :

Edit the @State private var offset:CGFloat = 0 value by this :

offset = tabBar.bounds.height-tabBar.safeAreaInsets.bottom

And then add this to the ViewController :

override func viewWillTransition(to size: CGSize, with coordinator: UIViewControllerTransitionCoordinator) {
    super.viewWillTransition(to: size, with: coordinator)
    DispatchQueue.main.async {
        if let tabBar = self.tabBarController {
            self.callback(tabBar.tabBar)
        }
    }
}
-2

This is another use for @Asperi answer.

I needed to change the Tab Bar's background colour depending on user choice using a toggle. ( Black/Clear )

In the Tab View.

We have access to a stored bool for user defaults. (they choose by using a toggle button elsewhere which sets the bool)

 @AppStorage("radioViewImageBGSafeEdges") var showBGUnderTabBar: Bool  = true

We also have a @State var for a. UITabBar

 @State private var tabBar_  = UITabBar()

This will be loaded with the tab bar that we get from @Asperi code.

In my case it is only one view that requires the tab bar to be changed. All others remain the same.

So I add the modifier only under that tab view.

     RadioView().tag(0).tabItem { Label("Radio", systemImage: "dot.radiowaves.left.and.right") }
                .background(Color.black.opacity(0.5))
.background(TabBarAccessor { tabBar in
                                
                                    //==load the tabBar into our star var for use elsewhere
                                    
                                    self.tabBar_ = tabBar
                                    
                                    //== change colour
                                  tabBar.backgroundColor =      showBGUnderTabBar ?   UIColor.black :  UIColor.clear
                                               })

--

See that I have add this line inside the modifier.

 self.tabBar_ = tabBar

We now have access to the Tab bar and can use it in an .onChange(of:) modifier on the same tab view.

     .onChange(of: showBGUnderTabBar) { newValue in
        
                        tabBar_.backgroundColor =      newValue ?   UIColor.black :  UIColor.clear
    }

Now when the state var changes, we the Tab bar colour will change straight away.

1
  • 1
    It does not answer the OP's question Jul 30 at 10:06

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