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I'm currently working on a safe integer library for C++. I've come across some issues when implementing subtraction.

Here's what I start with:

#include <limits>
#include <stdexcept>

template<typename I>
class safe_int
{
    I val;

public:
    typedef I value_type;
    static constexpr I max = std::numeric_limits<I>::max();
    static constexpr I min = std::numeric_limits<I>::min();

    safe_int(I i) : val { i } { };

    safe_int &operator+=(I rhs)
    {
        if( val > 0 && rhs > max - val )
            throw std::overflow_error("");
        else if( val < 0 && rhs < min - val )
            throw std::underflow_error("");

        val += rhs;
        return *this;
    }
};

I first attempted to write operator-= like this:

safe_int &operator-=(I rhs)
{
    return operator+=(-rhs);
}

but obviously this will fail with input of -0x80000000 on a two's complement system.

I then attempted to do it like this:

safe_int &operator-=(I rhs)
{
    if(rhs < -max)
        throw std::overflow_error("");

    return operator+=(-rhs);
}

But this doesn't work for anything less than 0 (e.x. -1 - -0x80000000 should be 0x7fffffff but instead reports overflow).

I then tried this:

safe_int &operator-=(I rhs)
{
    if( rhs < -max && val > 0 )
        throw std::overflow_error("");

    return operator+=(-rhs);
}

But now even though it correctly catches a case where overflow would occur, it itself causes overflow in a valid case (e.x. -1 - -0x80000000, where - -0x80000000 overflows).

At this point I believe that there's no way to reuse code from the addition while catching all of the corner cases. Therefore, I should probably write different code for the subtraction.

How can I correctly check that integer overflow will not happen before subtraction?

Here's a little test program:

int main(void)
{
    safe_int<int> i = -1;

    i -= -2147483648;

    return 0;
}

Assume no particular size of integer. Do not rely on undefined behavior.

  • there are special instructions (addition, subtraction, multiplication) that inform about overflow - but I doubt that there are any portable ones. you can try to look for them. – ALX23z Jan 29 at 17:51
  • @ALX23z As you can tell I'm not using assembly nor am I adding before I check for overflow. I intend this to be entirely portable. – S.S. Anne Jan 29 at 17:52
  • I know this is besides the point, but have you checked boost.org/doc/libs/develop/libs/safe_numerics ? – Tarc Jan 29 at 18:44
  • @Tarc I don't use Boost. It's a pain to install and brings in a huge library to something that would otherwise be simple. – S.S. Anne Jan 29 at 18:53
  • Yeah, but at least it is curated and, I think, Safe Numerics is intended to be portable. Maybe it is worth reading to see the techniques the author made use of. – Tarc Jan 29 at 19:07
1
template<class I>
bool valid_add( I lhs, I rhs ) {
  static constexpr I max = std::numeric_limits<I>::max();
  static constexpr I min = std::numeric_limits<I>::min();

  if( rhs > 0 && lhs > max - rhs ) return false;
  if( rhs < 0 && lhs < min - rhs ) return false;

  return true;
}
template<class I>
bool valid_subtract( I lhs, I rhs ) {
  static constexpr I max = std::numeric_limits<I>::max();
  static constexpr I min = std::numeric_limits<I>::min();

  if ((rhs < 0) && (lhs > max + rhs)) return false;
  if ((rhs > 0) && (lhs < min + rhs)) return false;

  return true;
}

note that the two functions are basically asking the same question. First we ask "what direction will rhs move our result from lhs". Then we check if lhs is "far enough away" from the min or max in that direction.

In your code simply inject:

if (!valid_add(val, rhs))
   throw "whatever";

and

if (!valid_subtract(val, rhs))
   throw "whatever";

you'll need to change this code if not using it on integral types. On floating point types, there are more complications.

After you check that the operation is valid, simply do it. Don't call another function.

| improve this answer | |
  • The first is underflow and the second is overflow, correct? – S.S. Anne Jan 29 at 19:00
  • @S.S.Anne I have 4 different bounds checks in the above code, I'm not certain what you mean by first or second. Passing max is overflow, passing min is underflow, in a sense. – Yakk - Adam Nevraumont Jan 29 at 19:16
  • I meant the second function, that checks subtraction. – S.S. Anne Jan 29 at 19:25
  • 1
    @S.S.Anne Then no. Passing max is overflow, not underflow. Rearrange lhs > max + rhs to be lhs - rhs > max to see the (unsafe, but mathematically equivalent) version of the test. – Yakk - Adam Nevraumont Jan 29 at 19:28

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