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I have a weird situation regarding EntityFramework 6 with .NET 4.5 (C#).

I have (almost) the same query in two different places. But one time it queries agains the database and the second time it queries against in-memory objects. And since I'm filtering for a substring, this is a crucial difference:

Database structure are tables Role, Right and a cross-table Role_Right

First time around I want to find all available rights that are not already assigned to the role plus (and that's where it gets complicated) a manual filter to reduce the result list:

Role role = ...;
string filter = ...;
var roleRightNames = role.Right.Select(roleRight => roleRight.RightName);
var filteredRights = context.Right.Where(right => !roleRightNames.Contains(right.RightName));
if (!string.IsNullOrWhiteSpace(filter))
{
    filteredRights = filteredRights.Where(e => e.RightName.Contains(filter));
}
var result = filteredRights.ToList();

I cannot use IndexOf(filter, StringComparison.InvariantCultureIgnoreCase) >= 0) because this cannot be translated to SQL. But I'm fine with Contains because it produces the desired result (see below).

When enabling the SQL output I get:

SELECT [Extent1].[RightName] AS [RightName]
FROM [dbo].[Right] AS [Extent1]
WHERE ( NOT ([Extent1].[RightName] IN ('Right_A1', 'Right_A2', 'Right_B1'))) AND ([Extent1].[RightName] LIKE @p__linq__0 ESCAPE '~'
-- p__linq__0: '%~_a%' (Type = AnsiString, Size = 8000)

Which is exactly what I want, a case-insensitive search on the filter "_a" to find for example 'Right_A3'

The second time I want to filter the existing associated rights for the same filter:

Role role = ...;
string filter = ...;
var filteredRights = string.IsNullOrWhiteSpace(filter)
    ? role.Right
    : role.Right.Where(e => e.RightName.IndexOf(filter, StringComparison.InvariantCultureIgnoreCase) >= 0);            
var result = filteredRights.ToList();

This time it forces me to use IndexOf because it uses the Contains method of the string instead of translating it to an SQL LIKE and string.Contains is case-sensitive.

My problem is that I cannot - from looking at the code - predict when a query is executed against the database and when it is done in-memory and since I cannot use IndexOf in the first query and Contains in the second this seems to be a bit unpredictable to me. What happens when one day the second query is executed first and the data is not already in-memory?

Edit 10 Feb 2020

OK, so I figured out what the main difference is. context.Right is of type DbSet which is an IQueryable and so is the subsequent extension method Where. However userRole.Right returns an ICollection which is an IEnumerable and so is the subsequent Where. Is there a way to make the relationship property of an entity object to an IQueryable? AsQueryable did not work. Which means that all associated Right entities are always gotten from the database before doing an in-memory Where. We're not talking about huge amounts of data and at least now this behaviour is predictable, but I find it unfortunate nonetheless.

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  • well.. this question is in regards to Lazy\Immediate Loading of Linq Expressions, with consideration to supported type methods for LinqToSql compiling. Jan 30, 2020 at 9:53
  • Can you fix or clarify the line regarding "This time I need to use IndexOf because it uses the string.Contains ... " ... apart from the line being unclear, there is also a misconception being made here, the SQL LIKE operation is neither case-sensitive nor case-insensitive - the collation on the column as it relates to the table would be the determent factor there. you would handle case-insensitive checks here in the same regards as you would in SQL, toLower or toLowerVariant Jan 30, 2020 at 10:57
  • @BrettCaswell I clarified the sentence. Apart from that I only ever worked with database that are case-insensitive, so I never thought about that case. Jan 31, 2020 at 14:23
  • OK, so I figured out what the main difference is. context.Right is of type DbSet which is an IQueryable and so is the subsequent extension method Where. However userRole.Right returns an ICollection which is an IEnumerable and so is the subsequent Where. Is there a way to make the relationship property of an entity object to an IQueryable? AsQueryable did not work. Feb 10, 2020 at 12:06

2 Answers 2

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My problem is that I cannot - from looking at the code - predict when a query is executed against the database and when it is done in-memory and since I cannot use IndexOf in the first query and Contains in the second this seems to be a bit unpredictable to me.

You can use IndexOf and Contains in both queries, as long as you don't use the overload featuring a StringComparison. As pointed by @BrettCaswell, the case matching is fixed by the collation of your Database/Table/Column. A query will be translated to SQL if its root is a context's DbSet and all method calls are translatable to SQL.

As soon as a method cannot be translated, the current state request is performed at SQL level and the remainder of the query is performed in the memory of the .Net application.

Also I think that p__linq__0 value should be '%~_a%' as _ is a special character in LIKE clauses.

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  • 2
    Thx, I will try out what happens if I don't use StringComparison. As for the underscore, I faked the data a bit and just used the _a as an example. The SQL translator does it right. Jan 31, 2020 at 14:25
  • OK, so I tried out IndexOf without StringComparison where I know that it is turned into an SQL and it indeed works. Problem is - and here's where we get to the original problem - when I use IndexOf in the second query without StringComparison I end up right where I started as in I don't get any data (just like with Contains). So I still need to know when the query goes against the datbase and when against the string class. Which is unfortunate. Feb 10, 2020 at 11:25
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OK, so I found two different solutions to always query against the database in case a relation contains a huge result set. Both solutions are not directly intuitive - IMHO - and you will need the DbContext variable which you hadn't needed before.

Solution one is using the Role table as a starting point and simply filtering for the entity with the correct Id. Note You cannot use Single because then you deal with a single entity object and you're right back where you've started. You need to use Where and then a SelectMany even though it's counter-intuitive:

Role role = ...;
string filter = ...;
var filteredRights = context.Role.Where(e => e.RoleId == userRole.RoleId).SelectMany(e => e.Right);
if (!string.IsNullOrWhiteSpace(filter))
{
    filteredRights = filteredRights.Where(e => e.RightName.Contains(filter));
}
var rights = filteredRights.ToList();

which results in an SQL query against the DB:

SELECT 
    [Extent1].[RightName] AS [RightName]
    FROM [dbo].[Role_Right] AS [Extent1]
    WHERE ([Extent1].[RoleId] = @p__linq__0) AND ([Extent1].[RightName] LIKE @p__linq__1 ESCAPE '~')
-- p__linq__0: '42' (Type = Int32, IsNullable = false)
-- p__linq__1: '%~_a%' (Type = AnsiString, Size = 8000)

The second solution I found here: https://stackoverflow.com/a/7552985/2334520

In my case this results in:

Role role = ...;
string filter = ...;
var filteredRights = context.Entry(userRole).Collection(e => e.Right).Query();
if (!string.IsNullOrWhiteSpace(filter))
{
    filteredRights = filteredRights.Where(e => e.RightName.Contains(filter));
}
var rights = filteredRights.ToList();

and SQL

SELECT 
    [Extent1].[RightName] AS [RightName]
    FROM [dbo].[Role_Right] AS [Extent1]
    WHERE ([Extent1].[RoleId] = @EntityKeyValue1) AND ([Extent1].[RightName] LIKE @p__linq__0 ESCAPE '~')
-- EntityKeyValue1: '42' (Type = Int32, IsNullable = false)
-- p__linq__0: '%~_a%' (Type = AnsiString, Size = 8000)

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