0

Like

(true ? $a : $b) = 5;

Or

(true ? &$a : &$b) = 5;

Or

&(true ? $a : $b) = 5;


("It looks like your post is mostly code; please add some more details.")

| |
  • 2
    wait.. why would you expect you could? (boolean result) = 5 - you can't set a condition output to a value .. o.O – treyBake Jan 30 at 10:55
1

You can achieve quite the same result using, instead of the variable itself as return value of the ternary expression, the name of the variable.

(true ? $a : $b) won't return the variables, but their content.

This can be achieved like this :

<?php
${true ? "a": "b"} = 5;

echo $a; // outputs 5
| |
2

Make it like this.

$val = 5;
true ? $a = $val : $b = $val;
| |
  • Live Demo : sandbox.onlinephpfunctions.com/code/… – Niklesh Raut Jan 30 at 11:04
  • 1
    I'm really struggling to see what the point is though... won't $a in this example always be assigned $val since it's always truthy? The right-side of the ternary will never get hit..? – CD001 Jan 30 at 11:13
  • @CD001: (condition) ? condition_true : condition_false I assume whatever condition he is checking is true for one situation. Condition would not be just true. – Niklesh Raut Jan 30 at 11:38
  • Heh - I guess I was reading the code too literally, it said true so I assumed that's what the OP was actually doing *shrugs* ;) – CD001 Jan 30 at 14:17
0

No, in PHP, all the 3 codes give syntax error.

| |
  • 1
    as far as I know, in all languages it provides a syntax error. Assignment is variable = value. variable is always a variable (well, could be a pointer, a property too) and value is always a value or an expression – Cid Jan 30 at 10:56
  • @Cid This is allowed in C++ : *(condition ? a : b) = c; – gom Jan 30 at 11:08

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.