5

With reference to the answer given here, what output one must expect from the following code:

#include<stdio.h>

int main()
{
    int a=65;
    printf("%d\n",printf("%d\
    \n",a));
    return 0;
}

It gives the output:

65
4

But to me it would seem that it should give this:

65
3

Why is the output 65 4?

  • 10
    Are you running on windows? – dbush Jan 30 at 15:44
  • 2
    windows probably issues a \r character automatically – Jean-François Fabre Jan 30 at 15:45
  • 1
    Here it prints 7: ideone.com/hZNaFM Remove this `\` - you don't need it for line continuation, just enclose both parts of the string in double quotes. Otherwise it is taking your indentation as part of the string. – Eugene Sh. Jan 30 at 15:45
  • 3
    Hint for those reading the code: In the original source code there is a single TAB, not multiple spaces before \n",a)); in the code. It is not rendered correctly on the page (at least for me). – walnut Jan 30 at 15:51
  • 2
    @dbush: This definitely has nothing to do with Windows line-endings. They would affect the file position/length but not the return value of printf. – R.. GitHub STOP HELPING ICE Jan 30 at 15:56
9

You are printing 4 characters <tab>, \n, 6, and 5, so the result you're getting makes total sense.

Notice that the \ at the end of this printf("%d\n",printf("%d\ line, will include all of the indentation of the next line into the formatting string. This indentation was originally a <tab> character when you ran your file.

The reason why some people are reporting the ouput of 65 7 is that StackOverflow changes all tabs in the pasted code into 4 spaces, so the code they copied from your question was not the same code you ran on your machine.

See this demo, which shows the existance of the <tab> in the output (online version):

#include<stdio.h>

int main()
{
    int a=65;
    printf("%d\n",printf("%d\
    <--tab here\n",a));
    return 0;
}

Output:

65 <--tab here
15

If you remove the weird, totally unnecessary, and obviously error prone line continuation, it will print the expected output just fine:

#include<stdio.h>

int main()
{
    int a=65;
    printf("%d\n",printf("%d\n",a));
    return 0;
}

Output:

65
3
  • why doesn't it prints tab space in output, is it non printing – beta_me me_beta Jan 30 at 15:56
  • It's a whitespace character, how do you expect to see it? You could if redirected to hexdump or something. – Eugene Sh. Jan 30 at 15:57
  • @beta_meme_beta It does print the tab, see my demo. – ruohola Jan 30 at 16:01
6

Because of \ it is taking the indentation characters (tabs, spaces) of the next line as a part of the string. To concatenate strings on different lines simply enclose each part in double quotes:

#include<stdio.h>
int main()
{
    int a=65;
    printf("%d\n",printf("%d"
    "\n",a));
    return 0;
}

As a general note - the \ for line continuation is useful in multi-line macro definitions only or some exotic cases I am not aware of.

-1

It is quite simple to check

void printbuff(const char *str, size_t len)
{
    while(len--)
    {
        printf("%03d = '%c'\n", *str, *str >= ' ' && *str < 127 ? *str : ' ');
        *str++;
    }
}

int foo()
{
    char buff[32];
    int a=65;
    size_t len;
    printf("%d\n", len = sprintf(buff, "%d\
    \n",a));
    printbuff(buff, len);
    return 0;
}

int bar()
{
    char buff[32];
    int a=65;
    size_t len;
    printf("%d\n",len = sprintf(buff, "%d\n",a));
    printbuff(buff, len);
    return 0;
}

int main()
{
    foo();
    bar();
}

check yourself and you will know

It is just the char (or chars) between beginning of the line and the '\n', as it is still the same string. What is there depends on the editor.

Godbolt adds 4 spaces for example

https://godbolt.org/z/boPYNs

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.