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So I'm using insertion sort to sort the strings. It runs if the strings are already are sorted. If they are partially sorted or completely reversed. It either runs producing incorrect results or gives error:(0xC0000005).

Declaration of ptr: char **ptr; where memory is dynamically allocated.

Insertion sort:

 void insertionSort(char **ptr,int rows,int cols)
{
   char *key;
   int i,j;

   //first element is considered sorted 

   for( i=1;i<=rows-1;i++)
   {
      key=ptr[i];
      for( j=i-1;strcmp(key,ptr[j])<0 && j>=0;j--)
      {
         ptr[j+1]=ptr[j];
      }
      /*Program sometimes stalls at this part and gives error:`(0xC0000005)` 
      when strings are partially sorted/completely reversed*/
      ptr[j + 1] = key;
   }
}

It is your pretty standard insertion sort implmentation. Works with numbers so I don't know why I can't sort the strings.

Also this is how ptr's values were defined from the user:

void read_charArray(char **ptr,int rows,int cols)
{
   for(int i=0;i<=rows-1;i++)
   {
      printf("Enter name for name #%-3d: ",i+1);
      fgets(ptr[i],cols+5,stdin);
      ptr[i]=strtok(array[i],"\n");
   }
}
  • 1
    Please make a minimal reproducible example to demonstrate what you describe. – Yunnosch Jan 31 at 5:34
  • Just a little side hint, people here like code to b readable without scrolling horizontally, especially if the code also needs vertical scrolling; which yours will when you made a proper MRE. – Yunnosch Jan 31 at 5:35
  • How do you define array passed to that function? – Denis Sheremet Jan 31 at 5:42
  • @Yunnosch Is this alright? – Leon Jan 31 at 5:44
  • 2
    Still no definition of array. I mean, inside your main you've probably have something like char array[X][Y], I'd like to see that part too – Denis Sheremet Jan 31 at 5:46
1

The error lies in the 2nd for() loop of the insertion part of the program:

Insertion sort:

 void insertionSort(char **ptr,int rows,int cols)
{
   char *key;
   int i,j;

   //first element is considered sorted 

   for( i=1;i<=rows-1;i++)
   {
      key=ptr[i];
      for( j=i-1;strcmp(key,ptr[j])<0 && j>=0;j--)
      {
         ptr[j+1]=ptr[j];
      }
      /*Program sometimes stalls at this part and gives error:`(0xC0000005)` 
      when strings are partially sorted/completely reversed*/
      ptr[j + 1] = key;
   }
}

When j is decremented to be below 0, program actually continues to evaluate strcmp(key,ptr[j]) first despite the j>=0 expression being present(basically short-circuiting. See https://softwareengineering.stackexchange.com/a/201899 )-->This means that you are trying to access memory that is out of bounds(not allocated for program) thus causing an error:(0xC0000005).

This error: (0xC0000005) means "you accessed memory you had no right to use", such as, abusing pointers or arrays that aren't big enough,etc.

To rectify this all you have to do is switch up the condition expressions in for( j=i-1; strcmp(key,ptr[j])<0 && j>=0;j--) to for( j=i-1; j>=0 && strcmp(key,ptr[j])<0;j--).

What this does is that the moment j is decremented to be below 0, program tests for j>=0 first thus exiting loop rather than causing an error.

|improve this answer|||||
  • Good job getting it solved. Always keep in mind as your data sets grow, simple sorts become increasingly inefficient, e.g. Time Comparison of Quick Sort, Insertion Sort and Bubble Sort. Other sorts like the bottom_up merge-sort and quicksort (divide and conqueror algorithms) out perform bubble and insertion sorts by orders-of-magnitude. – David C. Rankin Jan 31 at 7:17
  • Can we then just use merge sort for most cases seeing that it seems to be the most efficient? – Leon Jan 31 at 7:30
  • Yes, but make sure you are using the Bottom_Up Iterative merge-sort instead of the Top_Down purely recursive merge-sort or for large data sets, you will exhaust the stack space due to the recursive function calls. Merge sort - Wikipedia provides a good explanation of both algorithms. – David C. Rankin Jan 31 at 7:32
  • Is there a reason why the iterative/recursive is called Bottom_Up/Top_Down respectively? PS: When it comes to algorithms, do you understand the general concepts encompassing the algorithm and just copy&paste the template of algorithm? – Leon Jan 31 at 7:46
  • 2
    My reading error as I read the non-idiomatic for( i=1;i<=rows-1;i++) as for( i=1;i<=rows;i++). Consider 1) for( i=1;i<rows;i++) as it is C idiomatic and simpler to read. 2) a minimal reproducible example is helpful - it encourages Up votes too. – chux - Reinstate Monica Jan 31 at 8:19

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