19

well is there? by string i mean std::string

6
  • 5
  • 3
    As much as I love C++, I still hate warping my mind around its strings.
    – pyon
    Mar 1, 2009 at 22:05
  • ah right. looks like a duplicate question. i recommend closing this one then and redirect people to the other "c-how-to-split-a-string". what do ya think? Mar 2, 2009 at 0:32
  • hmm i'm just reading the other question allows to have spaces in the string. maybe one should not close this one then. not sure anymore :) Mar 2, 2009 at 1:50
  • 17
    How about some of the examples from the following: codeproject.com/KB/recipes/Tokenizer.aspx They are very efficient and somewhat elegant. The String Toolkit Library makes complex string processing in C++ simple and easy.
    – Matthieu N.
    Dec 8, 2010 at 5:27

10 Answers 10

17

Here's a perl-style split function I use:

void split(const string& str, const string& delimiters , vector<string>& tokens)
{
    // Skip delimiters at beginning.
    string::size_type lastPos = str.find_first_not_of(delimiters, 0);
    // Find first "non-delimiter".
    string::size_type pos     = str.find_first_of(delimiters, lastPos);

    while (string::npos != pos || string::npos != lastPos)
    {
        // Found a token, add it to the vector.
        tokens.push_back(str.substr(lastPos, pos - lastPos));
        // Skip delimiters.  Note the "not_of"
        lastPos = str.find_first_not_of(delimiters, pos);
        // Find next "non-delimiter"
        pos = str.find_first_of(delimiters, lastPos);
    }
}
3
  • 1
    I like this solution. Unlike most other solutions, it doesn't require boost, combines delimiters, supports multiple delimiters, is well documented, and is fairly compact and easy to understand for noobs like me. I'd just change the delimeters parameter to take a default, as in the original: oopweb.com/CPP/Documents/CPPHOWTO/Volume/… :-)
    – JJC
    Feb 21, 2012 at 11:41
  • Also, noobs like me should be careful to clear the vector each time they call this function if they expect it to only hold the last set of tokens! (use tokens.clear()).
    – JJC
    Feb 21, 2012 at 11:42
  • 2
    Old thread that showed up in a search. I would change the signature of split to not have a third parameter, and return the vector<string> instead (tokens will be a local variable). Mar 10, 2014 at 4:05
11

There's no built-in way to split a string in C++, but boost provides the string algo library to do all sort of string manipulation, including string splitting.

10

Yup, stringstream.

std::istringstream oss(std::string("This is a test string"));
std::string word;
while(oss >> word) {
    std::cout << "[" << word << "] ";
}
1
  • 3
    This is my work-horse splitter. If you want to split on a delimiter, you can just replace oss>>word with getline(oss, word, ':')
    – Eponymous
    Dec 21, 2011 at 2:53
7

STL strings

You can use string iterators to do your dirty work.

std::string str = "hello world";

std::string::const_iterator pos = std::find(string.begin(), string.end(), ' '); // Split at ' '.

std::string left(str.begin(), pos);
std::string right(pos + 1, str.end());

// Echoes "hello|world".
std::cout << left << "|" << right << std::endl;
1
  • Would this be then applicable only for a two word string?? Jan 24, 2014 at 11:43
3
void split(string StringToSplit, string Separators)
{
    size_t EndPart1 = StringToSplit.find_first_of(Separators)
    string Part1 = StringToSplit.substr(0, EndPart1);
    string Part2 = StringToSplit.substr(EndPart1 + 1);
}
1
  • thanks, if this ends up in some opensource program somewhere, will i need to give you credit :) Mar 1, 2009 at 16:07
1

The answer is no. You have to break them up using one of the library functions.

Something I use:

std::vector<std::string> parse(std::string l, char delim) 
{
    std::replace(l.begin(), l.end(), delim, ' ');
    std::istringstream stm(l);
    std::vector<std::string> tokens;
    for (;;) {
        std::string word;
        if (!(stm >> word)) break;
        tokens.push_back(word);
    }
    return tokens;
}

You can also take a look at the basic_streambuf<T>::underflow() method and write a filter.

0
0

What the heck... Here's my version...

Note: Splitting on ("XZaaaXZ", "XZ") will give you 3 strings. 2 of those strings will be empty, and won't be added to theStringVector if theIncludeEmptyStrings is false.

Delimiter is not any element in the set, but rather matches that exact string.

 inline void
StringSplit( vector<string> * theStringVector,  /* Altered/returned value */
             const  string  & theString,
             const  string  & theDelimiter,
             bool             theIncludeEmptyStrings = false )
{
  UASSERT( theStringVector, !=, (vector<string> *) NULL );
  UASSERT( theDelimiter.size(), >, 0 );

  size_t  start = 0, end = 0, length = 0;

  while ( end != string::npos )
  {
    end = theString.find( theDelimiter, start );

      // If at end, use length=maxLength.  Else use length=end-start.
    length = (end == string::npos) ? string::npos : end - start;

    if (    theIncludeEmptyStrings
         || (   ( length > 0 ) /* At end, end == length == string::npos */
             && ( start  < theString.size() ) ) )
      theStringVector -> push_back( theString.substr( start, length ) );

      // If at end, use start=maxSize.  Else use start=end+delimiter.
    start = (   ( end > (string::npos - theDelimiter.size()) )
              ?  string::npos  :  end + theDelimiter.size()     );
  }
}


inline vector<string>
StringSplit( const  string  & theString,
             const  string  & theDelimiter,
             bool             theIncludeEmptyStrings = false )
{
  vector<string> v;
  StringSplit( & v, theString, theDelimiter, theIncludeEmptyStrings );
  return v;
}
0

There is no common way doing this.

I prefer the boost::tokenizer, its header only and easy to use.

-2

C strings

Simply insert a \0 where you wish to split. This is about as built-in as you can get with standard C functions.

This function splits on the first occurance of a char separator, returning the second string.

char *split_string(char *str, char separator) {
    char *second = strchr(str, separator);
    if(second == NULL)
        return NULL;

    *second = '\0';
    ++second;
    return second;
}
5
  • @cdonner, Because strchr is simpler. =]
    – strager
    Mar 1, 2009 at 15:58
  • 1
    @strager: This is bad design -- modifying the input. Though this is something strtok() has been doing and has gotten away with.
    – dirkgently
    Mar 1, 2009 at 16:22
  • @dirkgently, Eh, I misread strtok as strchr with multiple separators. Didn't know much about the function. My bad ... Also, I wouldn't say it's bad design. If documented properly it'd be quite clear, IMO.
    – strager
    Mar 1, 2009 at 16:33
  • strtok isn't reentrant. However, it would be perfectly reasonable to use a strtok-like facility that starts out by copying the input string into its own buffer, to avoid modifying input or global state.
    – Tom
    Mar 1, 2009 at 16:55
  • @epochwolf, At the time of posting this, the original question did not mention C strings or std::string.
    – strager
    Mar 1, 2009 at 20:38
-2

A fairly simple method would be to use the c_str() method of std::string to get a C-style character array, then use strtok() to tokenize the string. Not quite as eloquent as some of the other solutions listed here, but it's easy and works.

2
  • 2
    strtok writes into the memory pointed to. c_str() points to memory which must not be written to (invariant of the string class - might silently break things like copy-on-write semantics). the C++ standard forbids it. u can copy to a std::vector first, then you can use strtok though. Mar 2, 2009 at 0:47
  • The c_str method returns a const string which points to the internal representation. It's const so you'd also have to strdup it or copy it to a vector. A C++ way was asked for so I'm downvoting this.
    – hookenz
    Oct 20, 2010 at 8:37

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