0

I have to add here I am not a practiced questioner on Stackoverflow so I am glad for feedback concerning why my question might not fit here.

Is awaiting a TaskCompletitionSource a bad thing when wrapping a not async call?

Here is my use case:

I have a handler class which calls a function Func<T, Task> callback when an event occurs. The handler gets called from outside my Application and notifies my UI. There are two methods A and B which get used as callback. A where an async HTTP Client gets called and B where I do computation. In both cases the await call will unfreeze the UI and then properties get updated.

A:

public async Task A(){
 result = await CallHttpClient(...) // unfreeze UI
 // ... copy image bytes and update UI (long running not async)
 // release bytes in calling method
}

B:

public async Task B(){
 var  tcs = new TaskCompletionSource<bool>();
 await tcs.Task; // unfreeze UI
 // ... copy image bytes and update UI (long running not async)
 tcs.SetResult(true); // release bytes in calling method
}

My question here, is it a bad practice to use TaskCompletionSource to wrap a not async call?

The Documentation states the following.

If you want to create a task wrapper for an existing asynchronous operation or event, use TaskCompletionSource. https://docs.microsoft.com/en-us/archive/msdn-magazine/2013/march/async-await-best-practices-in-asynchronous-programming

Another possibility is to call Task.Run(), but it feels even worse to me. Not using Async would result in a freezing UI which is not really what I want although it might be the cleanest solution.

-------> Update

As state by others the Task.Run() is perfectly fine here.

I should note that my B: look different B:

public async Task B(...){
 var  tcs = new TaskCompletionSource<bool>();
 // ... duplicate bytes
 tcs.SetResult(true); // release bytes in calling method
 await tcs.Task; // unfreeze UI
 // ... copy image bytes and update UI (long running not async)
}

Find better option with Task.Run() below.

I should also note that when the method leaves the bytes (not shown in the example) are released.

6
  • 3
    What's wrong with Task.Run? Wasn't it made for running CPU-bound methods?
    – Clemens
    Jan 31 '20 at 9:24
  • 1
    You should change the title and the first half of the question to ask/explain what you really want. TaskCompletionSource is a tool, a specialized one. What are you trying to do though, and why don't you use await or Task.Run ? Jan 31 '20 at 9:24
  • 3
    How is code in B going to progress from the await to tcs.SetResult? It's going to be stuck at the await.
    – GSerg
    Jan 31 '20 at 9:25
  • 1
    await tcs.Task; doesn't unfreeze anything. await doesn't unfreeze, it awaits an already asynchronous operation to complete without blocking the thread. If that operation (or tcs in this case) never completes, await won't return Jan 31 '20 at 9:26
  • 1
    In await httpClient.GetStringAsync(), GetStringAsync() is an asynchronous operation, and await awaits it without blocking the thread, resuming execution on that thread when it completes. It's not await that makes GetStringAsync an asynchronous method Jan 31 '20 at 9:28
1

There is no way to do a CPU-bound task in the background without some sort of multithreading.

This code...

var  tcs = new TaskCompletionSource<bool>();
await tcs.Task; // unfreeze UI
// ... copy image bytes and update UI (long running not async)
tcs.SetResult(true); // release bytes in calling method

...will block on the await because SetResult is not called until after, resulting in a sort of deadlock.

I suppose you could do something nutty like this

var  tcs = new TaskCompletionSource<bool>();
Parallel.Invoke
(
    () => await tcs.Task,
    () => {
         // ... copy image bytes and update UI (long running not async)
        tcs.SetResult(true); // release bytes in calling method
    }
);

But I'm not sure that would work either. The standard way to do this would be

await Task.Run( () => {
    // ... copy image bytes and update UI (long running not async)
});

...which is certainly easier to follow, and is what Task.Run() is was meant for.

1
  • you are right i could use Task.Run(). It woudl be fine to call Task.Run(). And I should have written tcs.SetResult(true); before await.
    – Dr.Bob
    Jan 31 '20 at 9:56

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.