31

Please take a look at the following code. It tries to pass an array as a char** to a function:

#include <stdio.h>
#include <stdlib.h>

static void printchar(char **x)
{
    printf("Test: %c\n", (*x)[0]);
}

int main(int argc, char *argv[])
{
    char test[256];
    char *test2 = malloc(256);

    test[0] = 'B';
    test2[0] = 'A';

    printchar(&test2);            // works
    printchar((char **) &test);   // crashes because *x in printchar() has an invalid pointer

    free(test2);

    return 0;
}

The fact that I can only get it to compile by explicitly casting &test2 to char** already hints that this code is wrong.

Still, I'm wondering what exactly is wrong about it. I can pass a pointer to a pointer to a dynamically allocated array but I can't pass a pointer to a pointer for an array on the stack. Of course, I can easily work-around the problem by first assigning the array to a temporary variable, like so:

char test[256];
char *tmp = test;
test[0] = 'B';
printchar(&tmp);

Still, can someone explain to me why it doesn't work to cast char[256] to char** directly?

29

Because test is not a pointer.

&test gets you a pointer to the array, of type char (*)[256], which is not compatible with char** (because an array is not a pointer). This results in undefined behavior.

  • 3
    But why does the C compiler then allow passing something of type char (*)[256] to char**? – ComFreek Feb 2 at 15:24
  • @ComFreek I suspect that with max warnings and -Werror, it doesn't allow that. – PiRocks Feb 2 at 16:04
  • @ComFreek: It doesn't really allow it. I have to force the compiler to accept it by explicitly casting it to char**. Without that cast, it doesn't compile. – Andreas Feb 8 at 11:45
36

test is an array, not a pointer, and &test is a pointer to the array. It is not a pointer to a pointer.

You may have been told that an array is a pointer, but this is incorrect. The name of an array is a name of the entire object—all the elements. It is not a pointer to the first element. In most expressions, an array is automatically converted to a pointer to its first element. That is a convenience that is often useful. But there are three exceptions to this rule:

  • The array is the operand of sizeof.
  • The array is the operand of &.
  • The array is a string literal used to initialize an array.

In &test, the array is the operand of &, so the automatic conversion does not occur. The result of &test is a pointer to an array of 256 char, which has type char (*)[256], not char **.

To get a pointer to a pointer to char from test, you would first need to make a pointer to char. For example:

char *p = test; // Automatic conversion of test to &test[0] occurs.
printchar(&p);  // Passes a pointer to a pointer to char.

Another way to think about this is to realize that test names the entire object—the whole array of 256 char. It does not name a pointer, so, in &test, there is no pointer whose address can be taken, so this cannot produce a char **. In order to create a char **, you must first have a char *.

  • 1
    Is this list of three exceptions exhaustive? – Ruslan Feb 1 at 22:19
  • 8
    @Ruslan: Yes, per C 2018 6.3.2.1 3. – Eric Postpischil Feb 1 at 22:31
  • Oh, and in C11 there was also the _Alignof operator mentioned in addition to sizeof and &. I wonder why they removed it... – Ruslan Feb 1 at 22:45
  • @Ruslan: That was removed because it was a mistake. _Alignof only accepts a type name as an operand and never accepted an array or any other object as an operand. (I do not know why; it seems syntactically and grammatically it could be like sizeof, but it is not.) – Eric Postpischil Feb 1 at 23:58
5

The type of test2 is char *. So, the type of &test2 will be char ** which is compatible with the type of parameter x of printchar().
The type of test is char [256]. So, the type of &test will be char (*)[256] which is not compatible with the type of parameter x of printchar().

Let me show you the difference in terms of addresses of test and test2.

#include <stdio.h>
#include <stdlib.h>

static void printchar(char **x)
{
    printf("x = %p\n", (void*)x);
    printf("*x  = %p\n", (void*)(*x));
    printf("Test: %c\n", (*x)[0]);
}

int main(int argc, char *argv[])
{
    char test[256];
    char *test2 = malloc(256);

    test[0] = 'B';
    test2[0] = 'A';

    printf ("test2 : %p\n", (void*)test2);
    printf ("&test2 : %p\n", (void*)&test2);
    printf ("&test2[0] : %p\n", (void*)&test2[0]);
    printchar(&test2);            // works

    printf ("\n");
    printf ("test : %p\n", (void*)test);
    printf ("&test : %p\n", (void*)&test);
    printf ("&test[0] : %p\n", (void*)&test[0]);

    // Commenting below statement
    //printchar((char **) &test);   // crashes because *x in printchar() has an invalid pointer

    free(test2);

    return 0;
}

Output:

$ ./a.out 
test2 : 0x7fe974c02970
&test2 : 0x7ffee82eb9e8
&test2[0] : 0x7fe974c02970
x = 0x7ffee82eb9e8
*x  = 0x7fe974c02970
Test: A

test : 0x7ffee82eba00
&test : 0x7ffee82eba00
&test[0] : 0x7ffee82eba00

Point to note here:

The output (memory address) of test2 and &test2[0] is numerically same and their type is also same which is char *.
But the test2 and &test2 are different addresses and their type is also different.
The type of test2 is char *.
The type of &test2 is char **.

x = &test2
*x = test2
(*x)[0] = test2[0] 

The output (memory address) of test, &test and &test[0] is numerically same but their type is different.
The type of test is char [256].
The type of &test is char (*) [256].
The type of &test[0] is char *.

As the output shows &test is same as &test[0].

x = &test[0]
*x = test[0]       //first element of test array which is 'B'
(*x)[0] = ('B')[0]   // Not a valid statement

Hence you are getting segmentation fault.

2

You cannot access a pointer to a pointer because &test is not a pointer—it's an array.

If you take the address of an array, cast the array and the address of the array to (void *), and compare them, they will (barring possible pointer pedantry) be equivalent.

What you're really doing is similar to this (again, barring strict aliasing):

putchar(**(char **)test);

which is quite obviously wrong.

2

Your code expects the argument x of printchar to point to memory that contains a (char *).

In the first call, it points to the storage used for test2 and is thus indeed a value that points to a (char *), the latter pointing to the allocated memory.

In the second call, however, there is no place where any such (char *) value might be stored and so it is impossible to point to such memory. The cast to (char **) you added would have removed a compilation error (about converting (char *) to (char **)) but it would not make storage appear out of thin air to contain a (char *) initialized to point to the first characters of test. Pointer casting in C does not change the actual value of the pointer.

In order to get what you want, you have to do it explicitly:

char *tempptr = &temp;
printchar(&tempptr);

I assume your example is a distillation of a much larger piece of code; as an example, perhaps you want printchar to increment the (char *) value that the passed x value points to so that on the next call the next character is printed. If that isn't the case, why don't you just pass a (char *) pointing to the character to be printed, or even just pass the character itself?

  • Good answer; I agree the easiest way to keep this straight is to think about whether or not there's a C object that holds the address of the array, i.e. a pointer object that you can take the address of to get a char **. Array variables/objects simply are the array, with the address being implicit, not stored anywhere. No extra level of indirection to access them, unlike with a pointer variable that points to other storage. – Peter Cordes Feb 2 at 9:02
0

Apparently, taking the address of test is the same as taking the address of test[0]:

#include <stdio.h>
#include <stdlib.h>

static void printchar(char **x)
{
    printf("[printchar] Address of pointer to pointer: %p\n", (void *)x);
    printf("[printchar] Address of pointer: %p\n", (void *)*x);
    printf("Test: %c\n", **x);
}

int main(int argc, char *argv[])
{
    char test[256];
    char *test2 = malloc(256);

    printf("[main] Address of test: %p\n", (void *)test);
    printf("[main] Address of the address of test: %p\n", (void *)&test);
    printf("[main] Address of test2: %p\n", (void *)test2);
    printf("[main] Address of the address of test2: %p\n", (void *)&test2);

    test[0] = 'B';
    test2[0] = 'A';

    printchar(&test2);            // works
    printchar(&test);   // crashes because *x in printchar() has an invalid pointer

    free(test2);

    return 0;
}

Compile that and run:

forcebru$ clang test.c -Wall && ./a.out
test.c:25:15: warning: incompatible pointer types passing 'char (*)[256]' to
      parameter of type 'char **' [-Wincompatible-pointer-types]
    printchar(&test);   // crashes because *x in printchar() has an inva...
              ^~~~~
test.c:4:30: note: passing argument to parameter 'x' here
static void printchar(char **x)
                             ^
1 warning generated.
[main] Address of test: 0x7ffeeed039c0
[main] Address of the address of test: 0x7ffeeed039c0 [THIS IS A PROBLEM]
[main] Address of test2: 0x7fbe20c02aa0
[main] Address of the address of test2: 0x7ffeeed039a8
[printchar] Address of pointer to pointer: 0x7ffeeed039a8
[printchar] Address of pointer: 0x7fbe20c02aa0
Test: A
[printchar] Address of pointer to pointer: 0x7ffeeed039c0
[printchar] Address of pointer: 0x42 [THIS IS THE ASCII CODE OF 'B' in test[0] = 'B';]
Segmentation fault: 11

So the ultimate cause of the segmentation fault is that this program will try to dereference the absolute address 0x42 (also known as 'B'), which your program doesn't have permission to read.

Although with a different compiler/machine the addresses will be different: Try it online!, but you'll still get this, for some reason:

[main] Address of test: 0x7ffd4891b080
[main] Address of the address of test: 0x7ffd4891b080  [SAME ADDRESS!]

But the address that causes the segmentation fault may very well be different:

[printchar] Address of pointer to pointer: 0x7ffd4891b080
[printchar] Address of pointer: 0x9c000000942  [WAS 0x42 IN MY CASE]
  • 1
    Taking the address of test is not the same as taking the address of test[0]. The former has type char (*)[256], and the latter has type char *. They are not compatible, and the C standard permits them to have different representations. – Eric Postpischil Feb 1 at 13:09
  • When formatting a pointer with %p, it should be converted to void * (again for reasons of compatibility and representation). – Eric Postpischil Feb 1 at 13:10
  • 1
    printchar(&test); may crash for you, but the behavior is not defined by the C standard, and people may observe other behaviors in other circumstances. – Eric Postpischil Feb 1 at 13:11
  • Re “So the ultimate cause of the segmentation fault is that this program will try to dereference the absolute address 0x42 (also known as 'B'), which is probably occupied by the OS.”: If there is a segment fault attempting to read a location, it means nothing is mapped there, not that it is occupied by the OS. (Except there could be something mapped there as, say, execute-only with no read permissions, but that is unlikely.) – Eric Postpischil Feb 1 at 13:12
  • 1
    &test == &test[0] violates the constraints in C 2018 6.5.9 2 because the types are not compatible. The C standard requires an implementation to diagnose this violation, and the resulting behavior is not defined by the C standard. That means your compiler might produce code evaluating them to be equal, but another compiler might not. – Eric Postpischil Feb 1 at 13:16
-5

The representation of char [256] is implementation dependent. It is must not be the same as char *.

Casting &test of type char (*)[256] to char ** yields undefined behavior.

With some compilers, it may do what you expect, an on others not.

EDIT:

After testing with gcc 9.2.1, it appears that printchar((char**)&test) passes in fact test as value cast to char**. It is as if the instruction was printchar((char**)test). In the printchar function, x is a pointer to the first char of the array test, not a double pointer to the first character. A double de-reference x result in a segmentation fault because the 8 first bytes of the array do not correspond to a valid address.

I get the exact same behavior and result when compiling the program with clang 9.0.0-2.

This may be considered as a compiler bug, or the result of an undefined behavior whose result might be compiler specific.

Another unexpected behavior is that the code

void printchar2(char (*x)[256]) {
    printf("px: %p\n", *x);
    printf("x: %p\n", x);
    printf("c: %c\n", **x);
}

The output is

px: 0x7ffd92627370
x: 0x7ffd92627370
c: A

The weird behavior is that x and *x have the same value.

This is a compiler thing. I doubt that this is defined by the language.

  • 1
    Do you mean the representation of char (*)[256] is implementation-dependent? The representation of char [256] is not relevant in this question—it is just a bunch of bits. But, even if you mean the representation of a pointer to an array is different from the representation of a pointer to a pointer, that also misses the point. Even if they have the same representations, the OP’s code would not work, because the pointer to a pointer can be dereferenced twice, as is done in printchar, but the pointer to an array cannot, regardless of the representation. – Eric Postpischil Feb 1 at 13:27
  • @EricPostpischil the cast from char (*)[256] to char ** is accepted by the compiler, but does not yield the expected result because a char [256] is not the same as a char *. I assumed, the encoding is different, otherwise it would yield the expected result. – chmike Feb 1 at 13:43
  • I do not know what you mean by “expected result.” The only specification in the C standard of what the result should be is that, if the alignment is inadequate for char **, the behavior is undefined, and that, otherwise, if the result is converted back to char (*)[256], it compares equal to the original pointer. By “expected result”, you might mean that, if (char **) &test is further converted to a char *, it compares equal to &test[0]. That is not an unlikely result in implementations that use a flat address space, but it is not purely a matter of representation. – Eric Postpischil Feb 1 at 14:02
  • 2
    Also, “Casting &test of type char (*)[256] to char ** yields undefined behavior.” is not correct. C 2018 6.3.2.3 7 allows a pointer to an object type to be converted to any other pointer to an object type. If the pointer is not correctly aligned for the referenced type (the referenced type of char ** is char *), then the behavior is undefined. Otherwise, the conversion is defined, although the value is only partially defined, per my comment above. – Eric Postpischil Feb 1 at 14:04
  • char (*x)[256] is not the same thing as char **x. The reason x and *x print the same pointer value is that x is simply a pointer to the array. Your *x is the array, and using it in a pointer context decays back to the address of the array. No compiler bug there (or in what (char **)&test does), just a little mental gymnastics required to figure out that's going on with types. (cdecl explains it as "declare x as pointer to array 256 of char"). Even using char* to access the object-representation of a char** isn't UB; it can alias anything. – Peter Cordes Feb 2 at 9:15

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