6

I would like to create a checkerboard distribution in Python.

Currently I use the following script to create a 2 x 2 sized checkerboard:

import numpy as np
import matplotlib.pyplot as plt

n_points = 1000
n_classes = 2

x = np.random.uniform(-1,1, size=(n_points, n_classes))
mask = np.logical_or(np.logical_and(x[:,0] > 0.0, x[:,1] > 0.0), \
np.logical_and(x[:,0] < 0.0, x[:,1] < 0.0))
y = np.eye(n_classes)[1*mask]

plt.scatter(x[:,0], x[:,1], c=y[:,0], cmap="bwr", alpha=0.5)
plt.show()

which creates

enter image description here

I would like to know if there exists a simple way to generalize the above code to create a checkerboard distribution of size n x n?

EDIT

Using @jpf's great solution

import numpy as np
import matplotlib.pyplot as plt
from numpy import sin

n_points = 10000
n_classes = 2
n = 8

x = np.random.uniform(-(n//2)*np.pi, (n//2)*np.pi, size=(n_points, n_classes))
mask = np.logical_or(np.logical_and(sin(x[:,0]) > 0.0, sin(x[:,1]) > 0.0), \
np.logical_and(sin(x[:,0]) < 0.0, sin(x[:,1]) < 0.0))
y = np.eye(n_classes)[1*mask]

plt.scatter(x[:,0], x[:,1], c=y[:,0], s=1, cmap="bwr", alpha=0.5)
plt.savefig("test.png", dpi=150)
plt.show()

I can now generate checkerboard distributions of arbitrary size:

enter image description here

2
  • What's the use of the mask_1 variable?
    – rassar
    Feb 1 '20 at 17:47
  • @rassar Good point! mask_1 it not used. I'll remove it.
    – Samuel
    Feb 1 '20 at 17:51
5

How about using a periodic function like sine?

import numpy as np
import matplotlib.pyplot as plt
from numpy import sin

n_points = 10000
n_classes = 2

x = np.random.uniform(-10,10, size=(n_points, n_classes))
mask = np.logical_or(np.logical_and(sin(x[:,0]) > 0.0, sin(x[:,1]) > 0.0), \
np.logical_and(sin(x[:,0]) < 0.0, sin(x[:,1]) < 0.0))
y = np.eye(n_classes)[1*mask]

plt.scatter(x[:,0], x[:,1], c=y[:,0], cmap="bwr", alpha=0.5)
plt.show()
2
  • Using the sine to mask the array is an excellent idea, but then to make it generic (any n x n) you need to control the frequency of the sin function. You are still not doing that.
    – Valentino
    Feb 1 '20 at 18:13
  • 2
    Great approach. Instead of np.random.uniform(-10,10, size=(n_points, n_classes)) we can use something like np.random.uniform(-n*np.pi,n*np.pi, size=(n_points, n_classes)) to have perfect borders. Where n is a natural number.
    – Samuel
    Feb 1 '20 at 18:15

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