5

I have a singly-linked list type that looks like this:

struct point { int x, y; };
struct point_list {
    struct point value;
    const struct point_list *next;
};

I want to statically initialize one of these lists, with maybe a few dozen entries. I want to write one item per line with consistent indentation, to make it easy to edit the list.

So far the best I've come up with is this:

const struct point_list *const my_list =
    &(const struct point_list) { .value = { 1, 2 }, .next =
    &(const struct point_list) { .value = { 3, 4 }, .next =
    &(const struct point_list) { .value = { 5, 6 }, .next =
    NULL
    }}};

But the downsides are:

  • When I add or remove items, I need to update the number of closing braces on the last line.
  • It might be hard to convince a code formatter to keep this style.

Is there a better way?

If we had recursive macros, maybe something like this could work:

const struct point_list *const my_list = POINT_LIST(
    ((struct point) { 1, 2 }),
    ((struct point) { 3, 4 }),
    ((struct point) { 5, 6 }),
);

If we could run code at compile time, maybe something like this could work:

#define array_length(X) (sizeof(X) / sizeof(X[0]))

constexpr const struct point_list *array_to_list(size_t length, struct point *values) { ... }

const struct point my_array[] = {
    { 1, 2 },
    { 3, 4 },
    { 5, 6 },
};
const struct point_list *const my_list = array_to_list(array_length(my_array), my_array);
5
  • 3
    Should the member declaration const struct point *next; be const struct point_list *next;? – Eric Postpischil Feb 2 '20 at 1:04
  • 1
    What's the purpose of a linked list when you create it statically? You can never delete a node from the list. – Gerhardh Feb 2 '20 at 2:04
  • 1
    @Gerhardh: Other elements can be inserted before the static ones. Or it can be passed to routines that take a linked list that are also used with lists created dynamically. – Eric Postpischil Feb 2 '20 at 2:28
  • Thanks, const struct point *next; was a mistake. (That wouldn't be a linked list!) I've edited that line. – dpercy Feb 7 '20 at 4:12
  • Yes, I'm using a linked list because I want to (non-destructively) extend the list at run-time. I could use a linked list of arrays, or a linked list whose final node is an array, but I'd rather not complicate the data structure just to make the initializer nicer. – dpercy Feb 7 '20 at 4:17
8

Rather than declaring my_list as a pointer, you can declare it as an array:

struct point_list const my_list[] = {
    { .value = { 1, 2 }, .next = &my_list[1] },
    { .value = { 3, 4 }, .next = &my_list[2] },
    { .value = { 5, 6 }, .next = NULL }
};

If you still want my_list to be a pointer, you can do something similar:

static struct point_list const my_list_data[] = {
    // ...
};
const struct point_list *const my_list = my_list_data;
1
  • I like this answer and the double const in the last line makes my head hurt. :) – grebneke Feb 14 at 14:58
1

I like 1201ProgramAlarm's solution, but if you don't, as a minor improvement to your form, you could put each closing brace on its own line. This "wastes lines", but it makes your diffs symmetric and +-only, rather than

-}}}}}};
+}}}}}}};

or similar.

I would also think about whether it even makes sense to use a linked list that's not mutable. It might if there's an interface you need to pass it to that only accepts linked lists. But otherwise, an array is a strictly superior data structure for an immutable list.

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