3

I have lines of input containing 8 fields. Like so:

Field1  Field2  Field3  Field4  Field5  Field6  Field7    Field8
name    ID      number  stuff   Jan15   ?       00:00:00  some command 

One of the fields, Field7, is a timestamp like so 00:00:00 I would like to "scan" this 7th field and see if the time is greater than one minute, i.e if the 7th field is greater than 00:01:00.

If the 7th field is greater I would then like to print the values of fields 2 7 and 8 to a file. I have very little experience with awk, but from what I understand this is the tool I want to use.

  • Please post more clear example/sample of input and expected output and remove xxx from your samples, to make it more clear. – RavinderSingh13 Feb 3 at 6:41
5

EDIT1: To run it with ps command use it like:

ps -ef | awk '
{
  split($7,array,":")
  tot_time=array[2]*60+array[3]
  if(tot_time>60){
    print $2,$7,$8
  }
  tot_time=""
  delete array
}
'

Also to cover 1 edge case of where process running for exact 1 hour and lesser than a min :) try following.

ps -ef | awk '
{
  split($7,array,":")
  tot_time=array[1]*3600+array[2]*60+array[3]
  if(tot_time>60){
    print $2,$7,$8
  }
  tot_time=""
  delete array
}
'


Could you please try following. Splitting 7th column into 3 different parts(hours, mins and secs) with having delimiter as : and then calculating minutes from it to check either its value is more than 60 or not.

awk '
{
  split($7,array,":")
  tot_time=array[2]*60+array[3]
  if(tot_time>60){
    print $2,$7,$8
  }
  tot_time=""
  delete array
}
'   Input_file


Test with samples:

cat Input_file
Field1  Field2  Field3  Field4  Field5  Field6  Field7  Field8
xxx     xxx     xxx     xxx     xxx     xxx     00:01:01     xxx
xxx     xxx     xxx     xxx     xxx     xxx     00:00:48    xxx

After running code following will be the output.

awk '
{
  split($7,array,":")
  tot_time=array[2]*60+array[3]
  if(tot_time>60){
    print $2,$7,$8
  }
  tot_time=""
  delete array
}
'  Input_file
xxx 00:01:01 xxx
| improve this answer | |
  • i piped my input into this awk command and it did seem to work, only nothing printed to the terminal screen and I expected at least a couple of print outs. thank you this helped me understand a bit more what awk can do. – Jay Wehrman Feb 3 at 6:53
  • 1
    @JayWehrman, I just added a testing sample with code working and looks it worked fine for me, could you please do lemme know what didn't work exactly here? – RavinderSingh13 Feb 3 at 6:57
  • hmm so it works when I make my own input file and give that to awk, but when i try to pipe in echo ps -ef into that same awk script, the file i am writing awks results to is empty. – Jay Wehrman Feb 3 at 7:04
  • 1
    @JayWehrman, I have added a EDIT1 solution, could you please check it and lemme know if that helps you? – RavinderSingh13 Feb 3 at 7:06
  • 1
    thank you so much that worked! I had echo before ps in my bash script! – Jay Wehrman Feb 3 at 7:09
4

Assuming the fields are separated by whitespaces or tabs, how about:

awk '$7 > "00:01:00" {print $2, $7, $8}' file

input:

name1   ID1      number1  stuff   Jan15   ?       00:00:59  somecommand1
name2   ID2      number2  stuff   Jan15   ?       00:01:00  somecommand2
name3   ID3      number3  stuff   Jan15   ?       00:01:01  somecommand3
name4   ID4      number3  stuff   Jan15   ?       00:02:00  somecommand4

output:

ID3 00:01:01 somecommand3
ID4 00:02:00 somecommand4

Awk primarily compares two strings as strings unless the both are numeric values or one is a numeric and the other is a numeric string.
In this case string comparison is performed then you can directly compare the time strings in the HH:MM:SS representation.

| improve this answer | |
3

Assuming your file is space/tab separated, this should do the trick:

awk '$7!~/^(00:01:00|00:00)/{print $2,$7,$8}' file > out_file
| improve this answer | |
0

If you have the following input file:

Field1  Field2  Field3  Field4  Field5  Field6  Field7    Field8
name    ID      number  stuff   Jan15   ?       00:00:14  somecommand
name2   ID2     number2 stuff   Jan15   ?       00:00:30  somecommand2
name3   ID3     number3 stuff   Jan15   ?       00:01:30  somecommand3
name4   ID4     number4 stuff   Jan15   ?       01:01:30  somecommand4
name5   ID5     number5 stuff   Jan15   ?       01:00:00  somecommand5
name6   ID6     number6 stuff   Jan15   ?       00:01:00  somecommand5

You can use the following awk command

awk '$7 !~ /(^00:00|00:01:00)/ || NR==1 {print $2,$7,$8}' f.in | column -t

It will give the output:

Field2  Field7    Field8
ID3     00:01:30  somecommand3
ID4     01:01:30  somecommand4
ID5     01:00:00  somecommand5

Explanations:

  • Approach based on regex
  • NR==1 to print the first line (you can remove this part if not necessary)
  • The pattern does not start by 00:00 or is not equal to 00:01:00, this can be removed if you change your constraint into greater or equal to 1 minute
  • print the required fields
  • column -t is for pretty output, can be removed.
| improve this answer | |

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