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I have the following df2:

df2 = pd.DataFrame({"price":[200,205,210,208,206, 199, 192, 185, 165, 160, 161, 165, 168, 171, 169, 163, 161], "signal": [1,0,0,0,-1,np.nan,np.nan,np.nan,np.nan,np.nan,np.nan,1,0,0,0,-1,np.nan]})
# for signal, 1 means you opened a position, 0 means you're in the position, and -1 means you closed the position, NaN means you don't currently have a position 

So I have an open position in df2[0:5] and df2[11:16]. For these two separate ranges (df2[0:5] and df2[11:16]), I want the separate cummax() of the price column.

I tried df2['trailing high'] = np.where(df2['signal'] != np.nan, df2['price'].cummax(), np.nan), but this just gives me the cummax() of the entire price column instead of giving me the cummax() of df2[0:5] and df2[11:16]

the final df should look like this:

finaldf = pd.DataFrame({"price":[200,205,210,208,206, 199, 192, 185, 165, 160, 161, 165, 168, 171, 169, 163, 161], "signal": [1,0,0,0,-1,np.nan,np.nan,np.nan,np.nan,np.nan,np.nan,1,0,0,0,-1,np.nan], "trailing_high": [200, 205, 210, 210, 210, np.nan, np.nan, np.nan, np.nan, np.nan, np.nan, 165, 168, 171, 171, 171, np.nan]})
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  • Is each run of 1...-1 always separated by np.nan or can you get (1,0,0,-1,1,0,-1)? – scign Feb 3 '20 at 19:45
  • it doesn't have to be np.nan, I just used that as a separator. It could be any number; its purpose is to identify when I dont currently have an open position – HDBrew Feb 3 '20 at 19:57
  • Yes but is each open position separated, or can you have two consecutive open positions with no gap? I presume in that situation you would want the cumulative max to treat those separately. – scign Feb 3 '20 at 20:20
  • oh i see what you're saying. Yes, in that scenario the cumulative max should treat those separately. so you can have (1,0,0,-1,1,0,-1), but I'd want the cummax() of (1,0,0,-1) and then cummax() of (1,0,-1) – HDBrew Feb 3 '20 at 20:25
1

Modified this slightly to give two extra test cases - one where the positions are consecutive, and another where a position is not exited by the end of the series.

The trick here is to use np.split to split the dataframe where signal == 1 then split again where signal == -1, giving multiple pairs of groups, then setting trailing_high to cummax and np.nan for the first and second of each pair of resulting groups respectively. Finally concatenate the dataframes back together.

import pandas as pd
import numpy as np
df_inp = pd.DataFrame({
    "price": [
         200,205,210,208,206,199,192,185,165,160,
         169,165,168,171,169,163,161,160,161,146],
    "signal": [
         1,0,0,0,-1,np.nan,np.nan,np.nan,np.nan,1,
         -1,1,0,0,0,-1,np.nan,1,0,0]
})

df_tgt = pd.DataFrame({
    "price": [
         200,205,210,208,206,199,192,185,165,160,
         169,165,168,171,169,163,161,160,161,146],
    "signal": [
         1,0,0,0,-1,np.nan,np.nan,np.nan,np.nan,1,
         -1,1,0,0,0,-1,np.nan,1,0,0],
    "trailing_high": [
        200,205,210,210,210,np.nan,np.nan,np.nan,np.nan,160,
        169,165,168,171,171,171,np.nan,160,161,161]
})

positions = []

# split the whole chain where signal == 1
chunks = np.split(df_inp,np.where(df_inp.signal==1)[0])
for group in chunks:
    # split the chunk into two AFTER where signal == -1
    pos = np.split(group, np.where(group.signal==-1)[0]+1)  # "+1" splits at the next index
    pos[0]['position'] = 'in'
    pos[0]['trailing_high'] = pos[0].price.cummax()
    if len(pos) > 1:
        pos[1]['position'] = 'out'
        pos[1]['trailing_high'] = pd.Series([np.nan] * pos[1].shape[0])
    positions.extend(pos)

# stitch them back together
df_out = pd.concat(positions)

print(df_out)

# test to see if the output matches the target
# (filling np.nan with -1 because np.nan != np.nan)
np.all(df_out.trailing_high.fillna(-1) == df_tgt.trailing_high.fillna(-1))

Output

    price  signal position  trailing_high
0     200     1.0       in          200.0
1     205     0.0       in          205.0
2     210     0.0       in          210.0
3     208     0.0       in          210.0
4     206    -1.0       in          210.0
5     199     NaN      out            NaN
6     192     NaN      out            NaN
7     185     NaN      out            NaN
8     165     NaN      out            NaN
9     160     1.0       in          160.0
10    169    -1.0       in          169.0
11    165     1.0       in          165.0
12    168     0.0       in          168.0
13    171     0.0       in          171.0
14    169     0.0       in          171.0
15    163    -1.0       in          171.0
16    161     NaN      out            NaN
17    160     1.0       in          160.0
18    161     0.0       in          161.0
19    146     0.0       in          161.0

True
2
  • Thanks, that worked! So what if you have your entry signals (1), but your exit signal (-1) is based off the price relative to your trailing high? For example, if price ever falls below the trailing high (e.g. when 208 < 210), that would generate your exit signal (-1), and thus you'd be "out." Which then in turn would mean you would not generating trailing highs until you're back in. – HDBrew Feb 4 '20 at 23:12
  • If the price drop drives the exit then you would have already calculated the trailing high before you calculate the signal which then drives the exit action. Having no open position then only takes effect at the next time point. Your question specified that when you have no open position you want the trailing high to be NaN so that's what the answer provides. – scign Feb 5 '20 at 2:21

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