2

I'm Learning data structure with javascript

and my focus now on how to implement deque?

Edite: from comments below I get useful directions on how to implement deque based array. Is there a direction how to implement deque based object using class ?

enter image description here

I get understand some points like I need :

  • addFront()
  • removeFront()
  • peekFront()

  • addBack()
  • removeBack()
  • peekBack()

but I'm confused about some points :

  • how many pointers I need ? at least I know from queue I need two(head-tail) pointer but not sure if I need more in deque

  • which data type in javascript convenient in this case as a base? I saw some tutors in youtube talking about circular array for example which unknown for me in JS.

edite2:

I was following a book called: learning javascript data structures and algorithms 3rd edition

in chapter5 of this book the author started to implement Deque based on object only and some variables

but I didn't understand how he did that because the code encrypted but I can still reach to his files from and test his approach github repository

I can say that @trincot answer very close of book author approach

but when I compare the results I get this [1 = author - 2 = @trincot] : enter image description here

according to the book index taking about linked list comes in chapter6 so I didn't expect his solution will be based on something he didn't mentioned before

plz if I miss any point I will be grateful to tell me it ... thanks

17
  • 5
    the default JS array already is such a structure: push(), pop(), shift(), unshift() as well as standard index accessing should give you all the tools you need.
    – Sirko
    Feb 4 '20 at 7:58
  • @Sirko do you mean I don't need deque and just default JS array do the job ? Feb 4 '20 at 8:09
  • @Sirko I get understand that default JS array allow random access to data while deque will not allow to add,modify or delete from the middle just from the end Feb 4 '20 at 8:14
  • @AymanMorsy, if that is your concern, then just invalidate all other methods that could be used on your array.
    – trincot
    Feb 4 '20 at 8:26
  • 1
    An JS array supports all methods you need. If any other method is to be suppressed, then you will need a wrapper or something similar to restrict access (maybe also to map(), ...).
    – Sirko
    Feb 4 '20 at 8:34
6

As stated in comments, JavaScript has native support for deque operations via its Array class/prototype: push, pop, shift, unshift.

If you still want to write your own implementation, then you can go for a doubly linked list, where you just need two "pointers". It should be said that in JavaScript we don't really speak of pointers, but of objects. Variables or properties that get an object as value, are in fact references in JavaScript.

Alternatively, you can go for a circular array. Since in JavaScript standard Arrays are not guaranteed to be consecutive arrays as for example is the case in C, you don't really need to use an Array instance for that. A plain object (or Map) will do.

So here are two possible implementations:

Doubly Linked List

class Deque {
    constructor() {
        this.front = this.back = undefined;
    }
    addFront(value) {
        if (!this.front) this.front = this.back = { value };
        else this.front = this.front.next = { value, prev: this.front };
    }
    removeFront() {
        let value = this.peekFront();
        if (this.front === this.back) this.front = this.back = undefined;
        else (this.front = this.front.prev).next = undefined;
        return value;
    }
    peekFront() { 
        return this.front && this.front.value;
    }
    addBack(value) {
        if (!this.front) this.front = this.back = { value };
        else this.back = this.back.prev = { value, next: this.back };
    }
    removeBack() {
        let value = this.peekBack();
        if (this.front === this.back) this.front = this.back = undefined;
        else (this.back = this.back.next).back = undefined;
        return value;
    }
    peekBack() { 
        return this.back && this.back.value;
    }
}

// demo
let deque = new Deque;
console.log(deque.peekFront()); // undefined
deque.addFront(1);
console.log(deque.peekBack()); // 1
deque.addFront(2);
console.log(deque.removeBack()); // 1
deque.addFront(3);
deque.addFront(4);
console.log(deque.peekBack()); // 2
deque.addBack(5);
deque.addBack(6);
console.log(deque.peekBack()); // 6
console.log(deque.removeFront()); // 4
console.log(deque.removeFront()); // 3
console.log(deque.removeFront()); // 2
console.log(deque.removeFront()); // 5
console.log(deque.removeFront()); // 6
console.log(deque.removeFront()); // undefined

Circular "Array"

class Deque {
    constructor() {
        this.data = {}; // Or Array, but that really does not add anything useful
        this.front = 0;
        this.back = 1;
        this.size = 0;
    }
    addFront(value) {
        if (this.size >= Number.MAX_SAFE_INTEGER) throw "Deque capacity overflow";
        this.size++;
        this.front = (this.front + 1) % Number.MAX_SAFE_INTEGER;
        this.data[this.front] = value;
    }
    removeFront()   {
        if (!this.size) return;
        let value = this.peekFront();
        this.size--;
        delete this.data[this.front];
        this.front = (this.front || Number.MAX_SAFE_INTEGER) - 1;
        return value;
    }
    peekFront()     { 
        if (this.size) return this.data[this.front];
    }
    addBack(value) {
        if (this.size >= Number.MAX_SAFE_INTEGER) throw "Deque capacity overflow";
        this.size++;
        this.back = (this.back || Number.MAX_SAFE_INTEGER) - 1;
        this.data[this.back] = value;
    }
    removeBack()   {
        if (!this.size) return;
        let value = this.peekBack();
        this.size--;
        delete this.data[this.back];
        this.back = (this.back + 1) % Number.MAX_SAFE_INTEGER;
        return value;
    }
    peekBack()     { 
        if (this.size) return this.data[this.back];
    }
}

// demo
let deque = new Deque;
console.log(deque.peekFront()); // undefined
deque.addFront(1);
console.log(deque.peekBack()); // 1
deque.addFront(2);
console.log(deque.removeBack()); // 1
deque.addFront(3);
deque.addFront(4);
console.log(deque.peekBack()); // 2
deque.addBack(5);
deque.addBack(6);
console.log(deque.peekBack()); // 6
console.log(deque.removeFront()); // 4
console.log(deque.removeFront()); // 3
console.log(deque.removeFront()); // 2
console.log(deque.removeFront()); // 5
console.log(deque.removeFront()); // 6
console.log(deque.removeFront()); // undefined

Methods will return undefined, when an attempt is made to retrieve a value from an empty deque.

6
  • I suggest adding delete to the remove methods, so that this doesn't leak memory.
    – kaya3
    Feb 4 '20 at 13:12
  • @kaya3, good suggestion! Added delete in the second snippet.
    – trincot
    Feb 4 '20 at 13:28
  • @trincot you are very close... I made some edite in my Q can you see it and give me an idea is that third possible implementation or just your answer and need some improve or some changing to reach the result I see above ... thanks so much Feb 4 '20 at 14:18
  • thanks alot trincot ... with the help of @Bergi get the source code of the third implementation I hope to help anyone github.com/PacktPublishing/… Feb 4 '20 at 15:34
  • @AymanMorsy, that implementation you refer to is really inferior. It performs a for loop to shift all items with one position, whenever you do an addFront and lowestCount is zero. That is really killing the performance gain you would expect to have from a deque. Moreover, JavaScript has an unshift method that does just all that, but more efficiently. An efficient implementation does not need to loop.
    – trincot
    Feb 4 '20 at 15:41
2

Dequeue implementation in a simple way:

const dequeue = [];

// push element from rear end
dequeue.push(3); // [3]
dequeue.push(8); // [3, 8]

// push element from front end
dequeue.unshift(5); // [5, 3, 8]
dequeue.unshift(11); // [11, 5, 3, 8]     

// pop element from rear end
dequeue.pop(); // [11, 5, 3]

// pop element from front end
dequeue.shift(); // [5, 3]

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