0

My program needs to be able to read its data from several databases (Postgres and Oracle).

Original try

So I thought I would use traits to hide implementations details and a generic function to get at the data. Sadly I need an cheat function to get at the Transaction in the case of Postgres backend:

trait DataSource<'a> {
    fn get_data(&mut self) -> String;
    fn transaction(&mut self) -> &mut postgres::Transaction<'a> {
        unimplemented!()
    }
}

trait BackendConnection<'a, TS>
where
    TS: DataSource<'a>,
{
    fn data_source(&'a mut self) -> TS;
}

trait BackendConfiguration<'a, TC, TS>
where
    TC: BackendConnection<'a, TS>,
    TS: DataSource<'a>,
{
    fn connect(&self) -> TC;
}

fn generate<'a, TF, TC, TS>(config: &TF)
where
    TF: BackendConfiguration<'a, TC, TS>,
    TC: BackendConnection<'a, TS> + 'a,
    TS: DataSource<'a> + 'a,
{
    let mut connection = config.connect();
    let mut source = connection.data_source();
    println!("{:?}", source.get_data());
}

// You can ignore all this, it is there just to show the reason why the lifetime is needed in `data_source(&'a mut self)` above.
mod pg {
    pub struct PgSource<'a> {transaction: postgres::Transaction<'a>}
    impl<'a> super::DataSource<'a> for PgSource<'a> {
        fn get_data(&mut self) -> String {
            let mut data = String::new();
            for row in self.transaction.query("SELECT CURRENT_TIMESTAMP", &[]).unwrap() {
                let st: std::time::SystemTime = row.get(0);
                data.push_str(&format!("{:?}\n", st));
            }
            data
        }
        fn transaction(&mut self) -> &mut postgres::Transaction<'a> {
            &mut self.transaction
        }
    }

    pub struct PgConnection {client: postgres::Client}
    impl<'a> super::BackendConnection<'a, PgSource<'a>> for PgConnection {
        fn data_source(&'a mut self) -> PgSource<'a> {
            let transaction = self.client.transaction().unwrap();
            PgSource { transaction }
        }
    }

    pub struct PgConfiguration {config: postgres::Config}
    impl PgConfiguration {
        pub fn new(params: &str) -> Self {
            let config = params.parse::<postgres::Config>().unwrap();
            Self { config }
        }
    }
    impl<'a> super::BackendConfiguration<'a, PgConnection, PgSource<'a>> for PgConfiguration {
        fn connect(&self) -> PgConnection {
            let client = self.config.connect(postgres::tls::NoTls).unwrap();
            PgConnection { client }
        }
    }
}

But the Rust compiler does not accept this:

error[E0597]: `connection` does not live long enough
  --> src/lib.rs:22:22
   |
17 | fn generate<'a, TF, TC, TS>(config: &TF)
   |             -- lifetime `'a` defined here
...
22 |     let mut source = connection.data_source();
   |                      ^^^^^^^^^^--------------
   |                      |
   |                      borrowed value does not live long enough
   |                      argument requires that `connection` is borrowed for `'a`
23 |     println!("{:?}", source.get_data());
24 | }
   | - `connection` dropped here while still borrowed

How can I describe that connection overlives source? My attempts introducing a scope around source or a 'b: 'a for connection did not give positive results.

Another try with Box and associated types

After some comments by Ömer Erden and Kornel I tried boxing the traits and using associated types. Woohoow, it compiles!:

#![feature(generic_associated_types)]
trait DataSource {
    fn get_data(&mut self) -> String;
    fn transaction(&mut self) -> postgres::Transaction<'_> { unimplemented!() }
}
trait BackendConnection {
    type Source<'a>;
    fn data_source(&mut self) -> Self::Source<'_>;
}
trait BackendConfiguration {
    type Connection;
    fn connect(&self) -> Self::Connection;
}

fn generate<TF>(config: &TF)
where
    TF: BackendConfiguration<Connection=Box<dyn BackendConnection<Source=Box<dyn DataSource>>>>
{
    let mut connection = config.connect();
    let mut source = connection.data_source();
    println!("{:?}", source.get_data());
}

// You can ignore all this, it is there just to show the reason why
// the lifetime is needed in `data_source(&'a mut self)` above.

mod pg {
    pub struct PgSource<'a> {transaction: postgres::Transaction<'a>}
    impl super::DataSource for PgSource<'_> {
        fn get_data(&mut self) -> String {
            let mut data = String::new();
            for row in self.transaction.query("SELECT CURRENT_TIMESTAMP", &[]).unwrap() {
                let st: std::time::SystemTime = row.get(0);
                data.push_str(&format!("{:?}\n", st));
            }
            data
        }
        fn transaction(&mut self) -> postgres::Transaction<'_> {
            self.transaction.transaction().unwrap()
        }
    }

    pub struct PgConnection {client: postgres::Client}
    impl super::BackendConnection for PgConnection {
        type Source<'a> = Box<PgSource<'a>>;
        fn data_source(&mut self) -> Self::Source<'_> {
            let transaction = self.client.transaction().unwrap();
            Box::new(PgSource { transaction })
        }
    }

    pub struct PgConfiguration {config: postgres::Config}
    impl PgConfiguration {
        pub fn new(params: &str) -> Self {
            let config = params.parse::<postgres::Config>().unwrap();
            Self { config }
        }
    }
    impl super::BackendConfiguration for PgConfiguration {
        type Connection = Box<PgConnection>;
        fn connect(&self) -> Self::Connection {
            let client = self.config.connect(postgres::tls::NoTls).unwrap();
            Box::new(PgConnection { client })
        }
    }
}

But it still fails to compile when I use the generic:

fn main() {
    let cfg = pg::PgConfiguration::new("host=host.example user=myself");
    generate(&cfg);
}

The error is:

error[E0271]: type mismatch resolving `<pg::PgConfiguration as BackendConfiguration>::Connection == std::boxed::Box<(dyn BackendConnection<Source = std::boxed::Box<(dyn DataSource + 'static)>> + 'static)>`
  --> src/lib.rs:26:5
   |
15 | fn generate<TF>(config: &TF)
   |    --------
16 | where
17 |     TF: BackendConfiguration<Connection=Box<dyn BackendConnection<Source=Box<dyn DataSource>>>>
   |                              ----------------------------------------------------------------- required by this bound in `generate`
...
26 |     generate(&cfg);
   |     ^^^^^^^^ expected trait object `dyn BackendConnection`, found struct `pg::PgConnection`
   |
   = note: expected struct `std::boxed::Box<(dyn BackendConnection<Source = std::boxed::Box<(dyn DataSource + 'static)>> + 'static)>`
              found struct `std::boxed::Box<pg::PgConnection>`

error: aborting due to previous error

For more information about this error, try `rustc --explain E0271`.

Note

If I monomorphize generate by hand it works:

fn generate_for_pg(config: &pg::PgConfiguration) {
    let mut connection = config.connect();
    let mut source = connection.data_source();
    println!("{:?}", source.get_data());
}

But of course I want to avoid this because it creates code duplication (I'd have to write a generate_for_oracle).

  • 1
    Is there any specific reason for restricting self with a lifetime a : fn data_source(&'a mut self) -> TS; in here? ` – Ömer Erden Feb 4 at 8:40
  • Yes: to implement the transaction method. See the second link (play.rust-lang.org/…) – kmkaplan Feb 4 at 8:46
  • Can you condense this to a minimal example? – Turion Feb 4 at 9:16
  • @Turion you can mostly ignore everything in the mod pg: it is there just to show the reason why the lifetime is needed in data_source(&'a mut self) – kmkaplan Feb 4 at 9:20
  • 1
    @kmkaplan, that's true. Your question will be much better though if you delete all these lines we can safely ignore. – Turion Feb 4 at 9:21
0

Nothing good ever comes from putting lifetime on &'a mut self.

When you find yourself doing this, you've dug to deep in the wrong place.

  • &mut isn't just mutable, it means exclusive access. And for safety this exclusivity applies to everything derived from it.

  • With shared borrows (&) the compiler is pretty flexible and can shorten the lifetimes in places where this is needed, so you can sprinkle 'a all over the place and it'll work out. But for obscure safety reasons &mut lifetimes have to be invariant, i.e. totally inflexible. Can't be shortened, can't be extended. &mut self.transaction is then called a re-borrow, and it creates a new borrow with a new lifetime.

When you have a lifetime on a trait DataSource<'a>, and &mut makes this lifetime invariant, it ends up meaning that everything 'a touches had to exist already before the object implementing DataSource has been created. And when you mix it with generate<'a> it expands that scope to mean everything with that lifetime had to be created even before genreate has been called.

I can't run the code, so I'm not sure if that's enough, but you've probably meant:

fn transaction<'tmp>(&'tmp mut self) -> &'tmp mut postgres::Transaction<'tmp>

simpler written as: (with no <'a> on DataSource)

fn transaction(&mut self) -> &mut postgres::Transaction<'_>

which should cast lifetime of Transaction to a scope started with that method call, which is as good as you can get anyway because of &mut in the return type.

  • I have tried doing what you suggest on the transaction method to no avail: I can't make it to compile. See play.rust-lang.org/… I'll reread you're answer and see if I can make something out of it. – kmkaplan Feb 6 at 13:32
  • When you have Trait<Arg>, the type of Arg is forced on you by the caller, and you're not allowed to decide what Arg is (e.g. imagine Trait<T: Debug>, you return String, but someone calls it on Trait<i32> - both implement Debug, but string != int). If you want to be dictating the type, you need Trait { type Assoc; } and return Self::Assoc. – Kornel Feb 7 at 11:40
  • I tried the associated type approach without success. See the edited question for details. – kmkaplan Feb 7 at 15:15

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.