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I have recently started learning C language so I don't much about the functions of C.

Recently I saw a program written in C on Internet article. It was like this:-

#include <stdlib.h>
#include <stdio.h>
#include <unistd.h>

int main(int argc, char *argv[])
{
    int i = 0;
    int j = 0;
    char ch;

    ch = getopt(argc, argv, "n:");
    if(ch == 'n')
    {
        j = atoi(optarg);
    }

    while(j--)
    {
        printf("%i\n",j);
    }
    return 0;
}

Can anyone tell what is the actual purpose of argc in getopt() function? Does it uses argc as for upto where it should read options?

  • It's just to tell it the length of the array pointed to by argv up to but not including the null pointer at argv[argc]. It could work that out for itself, but typically the argc value is readily available, so the designers of getopt decided to use it. – Ian Abbott Feb 4 at 11:53
  • 1
    @IanAbbott: That should be an answer, no? – R.. GitHub STOP HELPING ICE Feb 4 at 13:30
  • @lan Abbott Thanks for that precious information. – RajeeRim Feb 4 at 13:32
  • @R.. the standard is very unclear on what should happen when argc is actually smaller than the argument count. I expect any getopt implementation to respect it, and act as if argv[argc] == NULL even if it isn't, but I cannot find any guarantee for that. At to why argc?, this may offer some clues. – pizdelect Feb 4 at 15:19
  • @pizdelect: That's the outdated standard (current is pubs.opengroup.org/onlinepubs/9699919799/functions/getopt.html) but it's exceedingly, pedantically clear in one case: "If the resulting value of optind is greater than argc, this indicates a missing option-argument, and getopt() shall return an error indication." Otherwise, " getopt() function shall return the next option character (if one is found) from argv that matches a character in optstring" is somewhat ambiguous and could be interpreted as enging with argc or with the end of he null-terminated argv array. – R.. GitHub STOP HELPING ICE Feb 4 at 15:39
2

In my observation argc is there to write simple code and the argv NULL to write defensive code.

argv and argc has been in main's signature since the very beginning of C, so has the NULL at the end of the argv list. I've looked at many C programs since then and almost none of them depend on that NULL. Rather they depend on argc to control the array depth as it is simpler and more reliable. However, the defensive programmer will also look for that NULL as well as using argc and getopt() should use argc to complain if it's called too many times.

Also, I've seen code that plays games to reuse getopt() to parse secondary "command lines" for commands given to the application. Not all of those put a NULL on the end of the list (mine did, though).

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  • 1
    Some of the other answers and comments properly mention the C standard.... all very true. All very right and proper. Motto: know the standard. But my observations stared since before the ANSI standard was written and the standard only confirms my observation. – Gilbert Feb 4 at 17:55
1

The C standard does guarantee that argv[argc] is a NULL pointer:

C Standard, §5.1.2.2.1.2:

If they are declared, the parameters to the main function shall obey the following constraints:

...

— argv[argc] shall be a null pointer.

Technically, all you (and the function getopt) really need is argv - something like this will process all arguments:

int i;
for(i = 0; argv[i]; i++)
{
    puts(argv[i]);
}

However, there is nothing stopping you (or the author of getopt) from using argc as a loop guard instead. This is equally valid:

int i;
for(i = 0; i < argc; i++)
{
    puts(argv[i]);
}

So, if the function says it requires argc to be passed, then pass argc to it, because it probably uses it to form that type of loop.

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