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I try to explain my problem with a simple example

typedef function<bool()> TaskCallback;

class Task
{
public:
    Task(TaskCallback task_callback) : task_callback(task_callback)
    {
        long_string_test = "This is a long string 0123456789ABCDEF 0123456789ABCDEF 0123456789ABCDEF";

        xTaskCreate(Task::RunTask, "task_name", 2560, this, 3, &task_handle);
    }

    ~Task()
    {
        while(1); //Breakpoint: The destructor is never called
    }

private:
    static void RunTask(void* params)
    {
        Task* _this = static_cast<Task*>(params);

        _this->task_callback(); //The program crashes here because task_callback doesn't exist
    }

    string long_string_test;

    TaskCallback task_callback;

    TaskHandle_t task_handle;
};

main.cpp

static bool Init_task() { }

void main()
{
    Task task(Init_task);

    vTaskStartScheduler();

    //We should never get here as control is now taken by the FreeRTOS scheduler
    while(1);
}

If I check the value of the string long_string_test through the debbuger in the RunTask function I find that it has a strange value, as if the string had been destroyed. But the destructor of Task class was never called.

If I change the "main.cpp" as below the program works correctly, I think the compiler does some sort of optimization:

static bool Init_task() { }

Task task(Init_task);

void main()
{
    vTaskStartScheduler();

    //We should never get here as control is now taken by the FreeRTOS scheduler
    while(1);
}

p.s. obviously compiler optimizations are disabled

2
  • What platform is this on? How is the scheduler implemented?
    – Botje
    Feb 4, 2020 at 15:50
  • @Botje I'm programming on a system embedded (STM32F429ZI) with VisualGDB Toolchain (v5.5) Feb 4, 2020 at 15:57

2 Answers 2

3

As part of the vTaskStartScheduler call, prvPortStartFirstTask will reset the stack pointer. I can imagine that this will eventually cause other code to overwrite parts of the Task object on the discarded stack space allocated for main. You could set a data breakpoint with the debugger, but I would consider the main stack space trashed when the first task starts.

I think the best solution here is indeed to allocate the Task object statically or possibly with a heap allocation (if your system allows it).

2
  • You're right, I did some tests to verify what you said, see my next answer for more details. Feb 4, 2020 at 16:36
  • 1
    Yes this is the key. In the section "How can I reduce the amount of RAM used?" on this page there is a description of what happens to the main stack space and it is not the same on all Ports. freertos.org/FAQMem.html
    – Cobusve
    Feb 8, 2020 at 22:49
1

@Botje You're right I changed my example to verify what you said.

main.cpp

int* test;

static void RunTask(void* params)
{
    Print(*test);  //The "test" pointer has a random value
}

void main()
{
    int temp = 9999;

    test = &temp;

    xTaskCreate(RunTask, "task_name", 2560, NULL, 3, NULL);

    vTaskStartScheduler(); //It seems that FreeRTOS clears the main() stack

    //We should never get here as control is now taken by the FreeRTOS scheduler
    while(1);
}

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