1

The program below writes a floating point number to the database and then reads it back.

The hexadecimal represenation of the floating point value written is:

a379eb4c

The value read out of the database is:

bd79eb4c

The value written looks like a valid IEEE 754 floating point value (see here).The MySQL docs mention IEEE 754 here with some remarks of the internal storage format being machine dependent. This program uses MySQL 8.0.16 with the 64-bit ODBC driver on Windows 10 and my assumption therefore is that IEEE 754 is used throughout.

The complete output of the program is:

written (hex): a379eb4c
   read (hex): bd79eb4c
written (dec): 123456792
   read (dec): 123457000

How can the difference be explained?

Am I missing a setting somewhere?

Program (C#, Visual Studio 2019, .Net Core with System.Data.Odbc package):

using System;

namespace MySqlOdbcFloatTest
{
    class Program
    {
        static void Main(string[] args)
        {
            var connectionString = "DSN=MySql64";

            using (var connection = new System.Data.Odbc.OdbcConnection(connectionString))
            {
                connection.Open();

                // create table
                using (var cmd = new System.Data.Odbc.OdbcCommand("create table TestFloatTable (SomeFloat float)", connection))
                {
                    cmd.ExecuteNonQuery();
                }

                // insert float

                float floatToWrite = 123456789.0f;
                using (var cmd = new System.Data.Odbc.OdbcCommand())
                {
                    cmd.Connection = connection;
                    cmd.CommandText = "insert TestFloatTable (SomeFloat) values (?)";
                    var p = new System.Data.Odbc.OdbcParameter();
                    p.OdbcType = System.Data.Odbc.OdbcType.Real;
                    p.Value = floatToWrite;
                    cmd.Parameters.Add(p);
                    cmd.ExecuteNonQuery();
                }

                // read float back
                float floatRead;
                using (var cmd = new System.Data.Odbc.OdbcCommand())
                {
                    cmd.Connection = connection;
                    cmd.CommandText = "select SomeFloat from TestFloatTable";
                    var reader = cmd.ExecuteReader();
                    reader.Read();
                    floatRead = (float)reader.GetValue(0); // GetValue returns a float object
                }

                // write hex values

                Console.Write("written (hex): ");
                var floatWrittenBytes = BitConverter.GetBytes(floatToWrite);
                foreach (var b in floatWrittenBytes)
                {
                    Console.Write(string.Format("{0:x2}", b));
                }
                Console.WriteLine();

                Console.Write("   read (hex): ");
                var floatReadBytes = BitConverter.GetBytes(floatRead);
                foreach (var b in floatReadBytes)
                {
                    Console.Write(string.Format("{0:x2}", b));
                }
                Console.WriteLine();

                // write decimal values

                Console.Write("written (dec): ");
                Console.WriteLine(floatToWrite.ToString("F0"));
                Console.Write("   read (dec): ");
                Console.WriteLine(floatRead.ToString("F0"));
            }
        }
    }
}
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0

You are encountering MySQL bug 87794. The float is stored with the full precision, but is not returned to the client with full precision.

MySQL uses the FLT_DIG constant (which equals to 6 with IEEE 754 encoding) to print float-type numbers. FLT_DIG is the number of decimal digits that can be converted to a float-type binary number and back without loss of precision for any input number. That doesn't mean there are no numbers with more significant digits that can be represented precisely in the binary format (and your case is an example of such a number), but the constant ensures that property for all inputs.

There are a couple of workarounds you could use.

Binary Protocol

By default, MySQL uses a "text protocol" that sends numbers over the wire using ASCII digits. This is where FLT_DIG has an effect. By contrast, the binary protocol sends 32-bit IEEE 754 floats.

I don't know if the ODBC connector can expose the binary protocol, but MySqlConnector does for prepared statements.

using (var connection = new MySqlConnection("...;IgnorePrepare=false"))
{
    // read float back
    float floatRead;
    using (var cmd = new MySqlCommand())
    {
        cmd.Connection = connection;
        cmd.CommandText = "select SomeFloat from TestFloatTable";

        // ADD THIS LINE
        cmd.Prepare();

        var reader = cmd.ExecuteReader();
        reader.Read();
        floatRead = (float)reader.GetValue(0); // GetValue returns a float object
    }

}

Coerce to double precision

If you perform a calculation on the result, then MySQL will coerce it to double-precision. This will be formatted correctly on the wire and your client will read the correct result. Note that for MySqlConnector, the resulting value will now be typed as a double; quite possibly the ODBC connector works the same way:

// read float back
float floatRead;
using (var cmd = new System.Data.Odbc.OdbcCommand())
{
    cmd.Connection = connection;

    // ADD "+0" TO THE SELECT STATEMENT
    cmd.CommandText = "select SomeFloat+0 from TestFloatTable";

    var reader = cmd.ExecuteReader();
    reader.Read();
    floatRead = (float)(double)reader.GetValue(0); // GetValue returns a double object

    // ALTERNATIVELY, just use GetFloat
    floatRead = reader.GetFloat(0);
}
| improve this answer | |
  • Thanks; that explains it. Prepare does not help with the ODBC driver; coercing to double works but of course does not preserve the original object value type (something I'd prefer). There does not seem to be any setting in the ODBC driver regarding binary protocol or use of FLT_DIG, so for now it appears that this cannot be resolved satisfactorily with the ODBC driver. – J.R. Feb 6 at 3:55

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