344

How do I get a div to automatically adjust to the size of the background I set for it without setting a specific height (or min-height) for it?

1

30 Answers 30

662

There is a very nice and cool way to make a background image work like an img element so it adjust its height automatically. You need to know the image width and height ratio. Set the height of the container to 0 and set the padding-top as percentage based upon the image ratio.

It will look like the following:

div {
    background-image: url('http://www.pets4homes.co.uk/images/articles/1111/large/feline-influenza-all-about-cat-flu-5239fffd61ddf.jpg');
    background-size: contain;
    background-repeat: no-repeat;
    width: 100%;
    height: 0;
    padding-top: 66.64%; /* (img-height / img-width * container-width) */
                /* (853 / 1280 * 100) */
}

You just got a background image with auto height which will work just like an img element. Here is a working prototype (you can resize and check the div height): http://jsfiddle.net/8m9ur5qj/

19
  • 26
    Indeed awesome! Just for future generations watching this answer, if you are using compass (scss), I created a mixin from this using their helper functions to do the calculations for you: @mixin div-same-size-as-background-img($url) { background-image: url($url); background-size: contain; background-repeat: no-repeat; width: 100%; height: 0; padding-top: percentage(image-height($url) / image-width($url)); } Commented Jul 2, 2014 at 19:48
  • 21
    FYI to those who are wondering, the padding-top doesn't create a white space because it just adds height to the element. The image is a background image, so it shows with proper positioning and spacing. It's pretty stupid we have to come up with tricks like these for CSS.
    – ahnbizcad
    Commented Oct 13, 2014 at 5:44
  • 14
    Unfortunately, the padding-top doesn't allow you to put anything else in the div, such as form elements over the background.
    – Gary Hayes
    Commented Mar 27, 2015 at 23:52
  • 19
    @GaryHayes you can set position:relative to the div and put another div inside with position:absolute; top:0; bottom:0; left:0; right:0;set
    – malifa
    Commented Jun 12, 2015 at 15:50
  • 23
    Although this method works for showing a background image, it does render the div itself less useful by filling it with padding. Kryptik suggested adding an absolutely positioned div inside the container, but then why bother with a background image? You could then just use an actual image in the content div if you're going to just absolute-position everything over it. This defeats the purpose of using a background image in the first place.
    – paulmz
    Commented Jul 14, 2015 at 15:36
305

Another, perhaps inefficient, solution would be to include the image under an img element set to visibility: hidden;. Then make the background-image of the surrounding div the same as the image.

This will set the surrounding div to the size of the image in the img element but display it as a background.

<div style="background-image: url(http://your-image.jpg);">
 <img src="http://your-image.jpg" style="visibility: hidden;" />
</div>
14
  • 19
    not exactly useful since the image will use the 'space' and content will looks like having a great margin top. Commented Nov 17, 2013 at 8:24
  • 51
    Perhaps I'm missing something, but if you're going to put an img into your markup anyway, why not simply not hide the actual <img> and not bother with a background-image either? What advantage is there to doing things this way?
    – Mark Amery
    Commented May 18, 2015 at 9:39
  • 5
    Good answer, but doesn't the browser have to load it twice then?
    – www139
    Commented Oct 17, 2015 at 14:37
  • 12
    @www139 When you say load, what exactly do you mean? Once the image has downloaded, it is presumably cached. From that point, any other requests are based on a local copy. So, no. It is not downloaded twice. But, it is loaded twice.
    – Tmac
    Commented Oct 22, 2015 at 2:34
  • 3
    @MarkAmery One of the coolest things about background-image is that it can use CSS blend-modes, whereas img cannot.
    – Aaron Gray
    Commented Nov 22, 2016 at 2:47
39

There is no way to auto adjust for background image size using CSS.

You can hack around it by measuring the background image on the server and then applying those attributes to the div, as others have mentioned.

You could also hack up some javascript to resize the div based on the image size (once the image has been downloaded) - this is basically the same thing.

If you need your div to auto-fit the image, I might ask why don't you just put an <img> tag inside your div?

4
  • Thanks - but I need it as background so the image trick won't do it. i guess I am gonna hack up some javascript as you say worst case scenario but it's probably not worth it.
    – JohnIdol
    Commented Mar 1, 2009 at 23:13
  • 5
    ^^ That's probably not a good idea. The browser may take several seconds before your image gets downloaded, and you can't measure it until then, so your div will be hanging out at the wrong size for quite some time! Commented Mar 1, 2009 at 23:15
  • 2
    He could just run the JavaScript when the document is ready then. Commented Feb 2, 2013 at 23:01
  • 2
    You can't change the src of an img with media queries, but you can change the file used as a background image with media queries. Commented Jan 21, 2017 at 18:05
26

This answer is similar to others, but is overall the best for most applications. You need to know the image size before hand which you usually do. This will let you add overlay text, titles etc. with no negative padding or absolute positioning of the image. They key is to set the padding % to match the image aspect ratio as seen in the example below. I used this answer and essentially just added an image background.

.wrapper {
  width: 100%;
  /* whatever width you want */
  display: inline-block;
  position: relative;
  background-size: contain;
  background: url('https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/en/thumb/6/67/Wiki-llama.jpg/1600px-Wiki-llama.jpg') top center no-repeat;
  margin: 0 auto;
}
.wrapper:after {
  padding-top: 75%;
  /* this llama image is 800x600 so set the padding top % to match 600/800 = .75 */
  display: block;
  content: '';
}
.main {
  position: absolute;
  top: 0;
  bottom: 0;
  right: 0;
  left: 0;
  color: black;
  text-align: center;
  margin-top: 5%;
}
<div class="wrapper">
  <div class="main">
    This is where your overlay content goes, titles, text, buttons, etc.
  </div>
</div>

5
  • 2
    -1 for use of !important - and linking out to another answer. Please consider copying in the relevant code from the other answer (with attribution)i so that this one is more complete, and incase of link rot. Commented Oct 12, 2015 at 16:28
  • @jammypeach is this better? Commented Oct 12, 2015 at 19:32
  • 1
    @horsejockey unless I'm missing something this doesn't scale the image. It just masks it.
    – dwkns
    Commented Dec 9, 2016 at 18:11
  • @dwkns Strangely enough all background calls need to be in the one element. I found it was cropping when I specified the "background: url()" on a specific id and "background-size: contain" in a general class. Commented Mar 21, 2017 at 2:07
  • @dwkns Update: I was able to fix that issue by using "background-image: url()" instead of "background: url()". Commented Mar 21, 2017 at 2:12
18

I looked at some of the solutions and they're great but I think I found a surprisingly easy way.

First, we need to get the ratio from the background image. We simply divide one dimension through another. Then we get something like for example 66.4%

When we have image ratio we can simply calculate the height of the div by multiplying the ratio by viewport width:

height: calc(0.664 * 100vw);

To me, it works, sets div height properly and changes it when the window is resized.

4
  • 3
    yes, it's a neat trick, but if the image dimensions are already known, why not use simply the height from the image? i think what we are looking for is a solution that works with any image, without hardcoding numbers...
    – minusf
    Commented Feb 10, 2021 at 18:53
  • and also the growing and shrinking of the height based on screen size is also not always desirable
    – minusf
    Commented Feb 10, 2021 at 19:00
  • Great solution : It is responsive to the size of the browser, and you can still use with flex box display. I'll try this for my problem now and see if I can complete my work. Cheers!
    – m3.b
    Commented Nov 9, 2021 at 3:09
  • However, I would be interested to understand why multiplying the image ratio to 100vw makes it work. Cheers!
    – m3.b
    Commented Nov 9, 2021 at 3:38
16

Maybe this can help, it's not exactly a background, but you get the idea:

<style>
div {
    float: left;
    position: relative;
}
div img {
    position: relative;
}

div div {
    position: absolute;
    top:0;
    left:0;
}
</style>

<div>
    <img src="http://antwrp.gsfc.nasa.gov/apod/image/0903/omegacen_davis.jpg" />
    <div>Hi there</div>
</div>
2
  • please explain why you kept position of img as relative ? Commented Apr 5, 2016 at 9:30
  • 1
    Probably because the float: left; broke his positioning
    – Isaac
    Commented May 29, 2016 at 22:44
15

Pretty sure this will never been seen all the way down here. But if your problem was the same as mine, this was my solution:

.imaged-container{
  background-image:url('<%= asset_path("landing-page.png") %> ');
  background-repeat: no-repeat;
  background-size: 100%;
  height: 65vw;
}

I wanted to have a div in the center of the image, and this will allow me of that.

15

There is a pure CSS solution that the other answers have missed.

The "content:" property is mostly used to insert text content into an element, but can also be used to insert image content.

.my-div:before {
    content: url("image.png");
}

This will cause the div to resize its height to the actual pixel size of the image. To resize the width too, add:

.my-div {
    display: inline-block;
}
2
  • 1
    I like this solution, but when the browser is made smaller there there is a lot of white space left below the header image which is set to be responsive.
    – MG1
    Commented May 11, 2016 at 17:50
  • that's a lit one answer ❤
    – kuubson
    Commented May 10, 2021 at 8:48
15

The recently introduced CSS aspect-ratio attribute (~2020-2021) is a great way to do this without padding hacks and is supported on all evergreen browsers.

Since we need to know the aspect ratio of the image ahead of time, and in many usecases you'll be able to predetermine the image dimension ratio ahead of time (but not always for user generated content), you can either hardcode a single style or inline the css when necessary.

aspect-ratio will calculate the height when the width is specified, based on the provided ratio (or calculate width, if the height is specified).

div {
    /*common ratio, like an 800*600px image */
    aspect-ratio: 3 / 2;
    /* computed height will be 133.33px, which is width/aspect-ratio */
    width: 200px;
    /* red BG for debugging so any image bleed is shown*/
    background: red; 
    background-image: url('https://images.unsplash.com/photo-1631163190830-8770a0ad4aa9?ixid=MnwxMjA3fDB8MHxwaG90by1wYWdlfHx8fGVufDB8fHx8&ixlib=rb-1.2.1&auto=format&fit=crop&w=200&q=80');
}
<div></div>

3
  • 1
    Thank you for taking the effort to leave this comment here.
    – Matt
    Commented Dec 15, 2021 at 6:13
  • 2
    Holy crap, they finally added an aspecit-ratio attribute?? I remember a couple of years ago struggling my ass off with something that would've been easily solved by this, but I ended up having to JS it, IIRC. Thanks for this!
    – SeriousLee
    Commented Oct 9, 2022 at 4:58
  • Amazing. This should be the new accepted answer. Found this after an hour of looking through far more complicated solutions that were ultimately unsatisfactory. This works like a charm
    – Lancer521
    Commented May 24 at 19:01
7

You can do it server side: by measuring the image and then setting the div size, OR loading the image with JS, read it's attributes and then set the DIV size.

And here is an idea, put the same image inside the div as an IMG tag, but give it visibility: hidden + play with position relative+ give this div the image as background.

3
  • lol why require server side? It should be able to be implement with CSS.
    – GTHell
    Commented Oct 15, 2018 at 10:19
  • 2
    @GTHell hahaha - check the year I answered Commented Oct 15, 2018 at 19:30
  • @ItayMoav-Malimovka hehe, didn't notice that.
    – GTHell
    Commented Oct 16, 2018 at 11:44
6

I had this issue and found Hasanavi's answer but I got a little bug when displaying the background image on a wide screen - The background image didn't spread to the whole width of the screen.

So here is my solution - based on Hasanavi's code but better... and this should work on both extra-wide and mobile screens.

/*WIDE SCREEN SUPPORT*/
@media screen and (min-width: 769px) { 
    div {
        background-image: url('http://www.pets4homes.co.uk/images/articles/1111/large/feline-influenza-all-about-cat-flu-5239fffd61ddf.jpg');
        background-size: cover;
        background-repeat: no-repeat;
        width: 100%;
        height: 0;
        padding-top: 66.64%; /* (img-height / img-width * container-width) */
                    /* (853 / 1280 * 100) */
    }
}

/*MOBILE SUPPORT*/
@media screen and (max-width: 768px) {
    div {
        background-image: url('http://www.pets4homes.co.uk/images/articles/1111/large/feline-influenza-all-about-cat-flu-5239fffd61ddf.jpg');
        background-size: contain;
        background-repeat: no-repeat;
        width: 100%;
        height: 0;
        padding-top: 66.64%; /* (img-height / img-width * container-width) */
                    /* (853 / 1280 * 100) */
    }
}

As you might have noticed, the background-size: contain; property doas not fit well in extra wide screens, and the background-size: cover; property does not fit well on mobile screens so I used this @media attribute to play around with the screen sizes and fix this issue.

4

I would do the reverse and place the image inside of the main div with a width of 100%, which will make both the div and image responsive to screen size,

Then add the content within an absolute positioned div with width and height of 100% inside of the main div.

<div class="main" style="position: relative; width: 100%;">
    <img src="your_image.png" style="width: 100%;">
    <div style="position: absolute; width: 100%; height: 100%; display: flex...">
            YOUR CONTENT
    </div>
</div>
4

This Worked For Me:

background-image: url("/assets/image_complete_path");
background-position: center; /* Center the image */
background-repeat: no-repeat; /* Do not repeat the image */
background-size: cover;
height: 100%;
1
  • this could be shortened to background: url("/assets/image_complete_path") no-repeat center / cover; height: 100%; Commented Oct 26, 2021 at 9:11
4

Adding to the original accepted answer just add style width:100%; to the inner image so it will auto-shrink/expand for mobile devices and wont end up taking large top or bottom margins in mobile view.

<div style="background-image: url(http://your-image.jpg);background-position:center;background-repeat:no-repeat;background-size: contain;height: auto;">
 <img src="http://your-image.jpg" style="visibility: hidden; width: 100%;" />
</div>

3

If it is a single predetermined background image and you want the div to to be responsive without distorting the aspect ratio of the background image you can first calculate the aspect ratio of the image and then create a div which preserves it's aspect ratio by doing the following:

Say you want an aspect ratio of 4/1 and the width of the div is 32%:

div {
  width: 32%; 
  padding-bottom: 8%; 
}

This results from the fact that padding is calculated based on the width of the containing element.

2

How about this :)

.fixed-centered-covers-entire-page{
    margin:auto;
    background-image: url('https://i.imgur.com/Ljd0YBi.jpg');
    background-repeat: no-repeat;background-size:cover;
    background-position: 50%;
    background-color: #fff;
    left:0;
    right:0;
    top:0;
    bottom:0;
    z-index:-1;
    position:fixed;
}
<div class="fixed-centered-covers-entire-page"></div>

Demo: http://jsfiddle.net/josephmcasey/KhPaF/

1

May be this can help, it's not exactly a background, but you get the simple idea

    <style>
div {
    float: left;
    position: relative;
}
div img {
    position: relative;
}

div div {
    position: absolute;
    top:0;
    left:0;
}
</style>

<div>
    <img src="http://www.planwallpaper.com/static/images/recycled_texture_background_by_sandeep_m-d6aeau9_PZ9chud.jpg" />
    <div>Hello</div>
</div>
1

You can do something like that

<div style="background-image: url(http://your-image.jpg); position:relative;">
 <img src="http://your-image.jpg" style="opacity: 0;" />
<div style="position: absolute;top: 0;width: 100%;height: 100%;">my content goes here</div>
</div>
1

If you know the ratio of the image at build time, want the height based off of the window height and you're ok targeting modern browsers (IE9+), then you can use viewport units for this:

.width-ratio-of-height {
  overflow-x: scroll;
  height: 100vh;
  width: 500vh; /* width here is 5x height */
  background-image: url("http://placehold.it/5000x1000");
  background-size: cover;
}

Not quite what the OP was asking, but probably a good fit for a lot of those viewing this question, so wanted to give another option here.

Fiddle: https://jsfiddle.net/6Lkzdnge/

1

Suppose you have some thing like this:

<div class="content">
    ... // inner HTML
</div>

and you want add a background to it, but you do not know the dimension of the image.

I had a similar problem, and I solved it by using grid:

HTML

<div class="outer">
    <div class="content">
        ... // inner HTML
    </div>
    <img class="background" />
</div>

CSS

.outer{
    display: grid;
    grid-template: auto / auto;
    // or you can assign a name for this block
}
.content{
    grid-area: 1 / 1 / 2 / 2;
    z-index: 2;
}
.background{
    grid-area: 1 / 1 / 2 / 2;
    z-index: 1;
}

z-index is just for placing image actually at the background, you can of course place img.background above the div.content.

NOTE: it might cause the div.content has same height of the picture, so if div.content have any children that placed according to its height, you might want set a number not something like 'auto'.

1

inspired by the most liked answer, I ended up coming up with a solution using min-height and 'vw' unit

I had an image in a very unusual proportion

through experimentation I ended up using

    min-height: 36vw;

that value must change, according to the ratio of your image

css code used im my actual page:

    background:url('your-background-image-adress') center center no-repeat;
    background-size: 100%;
    background-position: top center;
    margin-top: 50px;
    width: 100%;
    min-height: 36vw;

code pen example https://codepen.io/viniciusrad/pen/GRNPXoL

1

In order to set the height of an "empty" container element to be aligned with the size of its background image, you simply need to perform a small calculation of ratio and set the height accordingly.

For example:

Let's say the background image size is 1920x600.

The ratio of the width and the height is 3.2 (1920 / 600).

The next step is to set the height of the container element with the background image in it to be according to the current view width:

div.container {
width: 100vw;    
height: calc(100vw / 3.2)
}

So, if the current view width is 1600px for example, the height will be 500px, and the background image will fit right in and the height will be exactly right.

0

Had this issue with the Umbraco CMS and in this scenario you can add the image to the div using something like this for the 'style' attribute of the div:

style="background: url('@(image.mediaItem.Image.umbracoFile)') no-repeat scroll 0 0 transparent; height: @(image.mediaItem.Image.umbracoHeight)px"
0

I have been dealing with this issue for a while and decided to write a jquery plugin to solve this problem. This plugin will find all the elements with class "show-bg" (or you can pass it your own selector) and calculate their background image dimensions. all you have to do is include this code, mark the desired elements with class="show

Enjoy!

https://bitbucket.org/tomeralmog/jquery.heightfrombg

0

The best solution i can think of is by specifying your width and height in percent . This will allow you to rezise your screen based on your monitor size. its more of responsive layout..

For an instance. you have

<br/>
<div> . //This you set the width percent to %100
    <div> //This you set the width percent to any amount . if you put it by 50% , it will be half
    </div>
 </div>

This is the best option if you would want a responsive layout, i wouldnt recommend float , in certain cases float is okay to use. but in most cases , we avoid using float as it will affect a quite of number of things when you are doing cross-browser testing.

Hope this helps :)

0

If the image height can vary or if you don't know exactly the height of the image, with a little bit of jquery, and css you can solve this:

HTML

<div class="bg-cover" style="background-image:url(https://i.imgur.com/Ljd0YBi.jpg);"></div>

JQUERY

<script>
var image_url = $('.bg-cover').css('background-image'),
image;

// Remove url() or in case of Chrome url("")
image_url = image_url.match(/^url\("?(.+?)"?\)$/);

if (image_url[1]) {
image_url = image_url[1];
image = new Image();

// just in case it is not already loaded
$(image).load(function() {
//alert(image.width + 'x' + image.height);
$('.bg-cover').css('min-height', image.height);
});

image.src = image_url;
}
</script>
1
  • Your answer could be improved with additional supporting information. Please edit to add further details, such as citations or documentation, so that others can confirm that your answer is correct. You can find more information on how to write good answers in the help center.
    – Community Bot
    Commented Apr 28, 2023 at 3:25
-2

actually it's quite easy when you know how to do it:

<section data-speed='.618' data-type='background' style='background: url(someUrl) 
top center no-repeat fixed;  width: 100%; height: 40vw;'>
<div style='width: 100%; height: 40vw;'>
</div>
</section>

the trick is just to set the enclosed div just as a normal div with dimensional values same as the background dimensional values (in this example, 100% and 40vw).

2
  • You're setting the height to be a proportion of the window width. This won't work in all cases - and some of your content, like data-speed has nothing to do with your answer.
    – Polyducks
    Commented Nov 4, 2016 at 15:30
  • 1
    Aren't most things "quite easy when you know how to do it"? Commented Jan 21, 2017 at 18:03
-2

I solved this using jQuery. Until new CSS rules allow for this type of behavior natively I find it is the best way to do it.

Setup your divs

Below you have your div that you want the background to appear on ("hero") and then the inner content/text you want to overlay on top of your background image ("inner"). You can (and should) move the inline styles to your hero class. I left them here so it's quick and easy to see what styles are applied to it.

<div class="hero" style="background-image: url('your-image.png'); background-size: 100%; background-repeat: no-repeat; width: 100%;">
    <div class="inner">overlay content</div>
</div>

Calculate image aspect ratio

Next calculate your aspect ratio for your image by dividing the height of your image by the width. For example, if your image height is 660 and your width is 1280 your aspect ratio is 0.5156.

Setup a jQuery window resize event to adjust height

Finally, add a jQuery event listener for window resize and then calculate your hero div's height based off of the aspect ratio and update it. This solution typically leaves an extra pixel at the bottom due to imperfect calculations using the aspect ratio so we add a -1 to the resulting size.

$(window).on("resize", function ()
{
    var aspect_ratio = .5156; /* or whatever yours is */
    var new_hero_height = ($(window).width()*aspect_ratio) - 1;
    $(".hero").height(new_hero_height);
}

Ensure it works on page load

You should perform the resize call above when the page loads to have the image sizes calculated at the outset. If you don't, then the hero div won't adjust until you resize the window. I setup a separate function to do the resize adjustments. Here's the full code I use.

function updateHeroDiv()
{
    var aspect_ratio = .5156; /* or whatever yours is */
    var new_hero_height = ($(window).width()*aspect_ratio) - 1;
    $(".hero").height(new_hero_height);
}

$(document).ready(function() 
{       
    // calls the function on page load
    updateHeroDiv(); 

    // calls the function on window resize
    $(window).on("resize", function ()
    {
        updateHeroDiv();        
    }
});
4
  • 1
    New CSS has been added! aspect-ratio
    – mix3d
    Commented Sep 9, 2021 at 19:23
  • 1
    @mix3d nice! This answer was from long ago and I knew improvements would come with time.
    – Art Geigel
    Commented Sep 11, 2021 at 23:33
  • Finally, 5 years later
    – mix3d
    Commented Sep 12, 2021 at 20:15
  • I tried to reply with simply "ha!" except 15 chars were required for a comment—hence this whole sentence.
    – Art Geigel
    Commented Sep 13, 2021 at 14:02
-2

If you can make an image on Photoshop where the main layer has an opacity of 1 or so and is basically transparent, put that img in the div and then make the real picture the background image. THEN set the opacity of the img to 1 and add the size dimensions you want.

That picture is done that way, and you can't even drag the invisible image off the page which is cool.

-4

just add to div

style="overflow:hidden;"

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