2

dplyr has the vectorized conditionals if_else and case_when.

However, both of these eagerly evaluate their possible outputs (true/false for if_else, the RHS of the formula for case_when):

suppressPackageStartupMessages({
  library(dplyr)
})

if_else(c(T, T, T), print(1), print(2))
#> [1] 1
#> [1] 2
#> [1] 1 1 1

case_when(
  c(T, T, T) ~ print(1),
  c(F, F, F) ~ print(2)
)
#> [1] 1
#> [1] 2
#> [1] 1 1 1

Created on 2020-02-05 by the reprex package (v0.3.0)

Here we can obviously see the false cases are evaluated even though they're never used. I'm looking for a way to avoid this since my

Is there an alternative which doesn't do this?

I'm aware, one alternative is actually base::ifelse:

ifelse(c(T, T, T), print(1), print(2))
#> [1] 1
#> [1] 1 1 1

However base::ifelse is notoriously inefficient, so a better alternative would be nice. That being said, I'm especially interested in alternatives for case_when, which I use quite a bit when I'd otherwise need to use a chain of ifelses.

I've already looked at data.table::fifelse, but it suffers from the same problem:

suppressPackageStartupMessages({
  library(data.table)
})

fifelse(c(T, T, T), print(1), print(2))
#> [1] 1
#> [1] 2
#> [1] 1 1 1

So, is there an alternative for if_else and case_when which doesn't eagerly evaluate its unused cases?

3

If you install the development version of data.table from GitHub you can use fcase which is similar to dplyr::case_when but with lazy evaluation:

data.table::fcase(c(TRUE, TRUE, TRUE), print(1L), c(FALSE, FALSE, FALSE), print(2L))

[1] 1
[1] 1 1 1
| improve this answer | |
  • Interesting data.table::fifelse is not lazy but fcase is – IceCreamToucan Feb 5 at 17:20
  • 1
    Indeed - especially since it is the same person behind. Perhaps one of data.table developers will stop by and explain the functioning more in detail, am happy to delete my post not to duplicate - in any case really great to have it, was one of the reasons why I've been using dplyr more often since there wasn't any really similar functionality – arg0naut91 Feb 5 at 17:30
2

You could just rely on native R's lazy evaluation of parameter passing and use all to screen for cases when FALSE isn't present:

lazy_if_else <- function(logical_test, value_if_true, value_if_false)
{
  if(all(logical_test)) return(rep(value_if_true, length.out = length(logical_test)))
  if_else(logical_test, value_if_true, value_if_false)
}

This out-performs ifelse and if_else

microbenchmark::microbenchmark(ifelse(c(T, T, T), 0, Sys.sleep(0.1)),
                               if_else(c(T, T, T), 0, Sys.sleep(0.1)),
                               lazy_if_else(c(T, T, T), 0, Sys.sleep(0.1)))
#> Unit: microseconds
#>                                         expr        min         lq         mean
#>        ifelse(c(T, T, T), 0, Sys.sleep(0.1))     12.662     13.689     25.47675
#>       if_else(c(T, T, T), 0, Sys.sleep(0.1)) 102723.054 109145.897 109678.33523
#>  lazy_if_else(c(T, T, T), 0, Sys.sleep(0.1))      4.791      5.476     10.80378
#>       median         uq        max neval cld
#>      15.3995     34.904     74.255   100  a 
#>  110036.0945 110176.049 116619.936   100   b
#>       6.5030     16.768     26.008   100  a 


| improve this answer | |
  • This would need to be modified to handle non-single-value value_if_true, but is a pretty decent idea. – Wasabi Feb 5 at 16:31
  • @Wasabi do you mean throw an error? That's what if_else does. if_else(c(T,T,T), c(1,2), c(2,3)) Error: 'true' must be length 3 (length of 'condition') or one, not 2 . This is different from ifelse which just recycles. – Allan Cameron Feb 5 at 16:34
  • @Wasabi I've changed it so it now mimics the behaviour of ifelse. The benchmarks don't change much. – Allan Cameron Feb 5 at 16:39

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