3

I have defined a class for using python interpreter as follows:

class pythonInt
{
public:
    pythonInt(const char* fname) {
        py::initialize_interpreter();
        m_Module = py::module::import(fname);
    }
    ~pythonInt() {
        py::finalize_interpreter();
    }
    py::module m_Module;
    // ... other class members and functions that uses m_Module
};

int main()
{
    pythonInt *p1 = new pythonInt("pybind_test1");
    delete(p1); 

    pythonInt *p2 = new pythonInt("pybind_test1");
    delete(p2); 

    return 0;
}

As soon as the class instance is being destructed I get Access violation reading location error when it reaches to deleting the instance _Py_Dealloc(op). How can I finalize the interpreter such that I can successfully delete the previously created class instance p1 and safely create a new class instance p2?

1 Answer 1

5

The crash is b/c the data member py::module m_Module; is created before and destroyed after the constructor/destructor of pythonInt is run, so before initialization and after finalization of the interpreter.

pybind11 offers scoped_interpreter for the purpose you're seeking and C++ guarantees construction/destruction order for all data members in an access block. So, assuming that you keep all (Python) data together and pythonInt has no base class (with Python data members), this would be an option:

#include <pybind11/pybind11.h>
#include <pybind11/embed.h>

namespace py = pybind11;
class pythonInt
{
public:
    pythonInt(const char* fname) {
        m_Module = py::module::import(fname);
    }
    ~pythonInt() {
    }
    py::scoped_interpreter m_guard;
    py::module m_Module;
    // ... other class members and functions that uses m_Module
};

int main()
{
    pythonInt *p1 = new pythonInt("pybind_test1");
    delete(p1);

    pythonInt *p2 = new pythonInt("pybind_test2");
    delete(p2);

    return 0;
}

Compared to your example, it adds #include <pybind11/embed.h> and py::scoped_interpreter m_guard; (where again it is to be stressed that the order is crucial); and it removes the interpreter initialization/finalization.

7
  • 1
    Thanks Wim. The code successfully passes delete(p1) which is great. However, it stops at pythonInt *p2 = new pythonInt("pybind_test2"); and gives error alreary set. Feb 6, 2020 at 21:38
  • 2
    The py::error_already_set exception's what() prints the str() of the actual Python exception. So, what does it state in full? If nothing, do a try {} catch(...){} around the statement and print the error through PyErr_Print(). Most likely there's a Python error in either pybind_test1 or pybind_test2 module. Feb 6, 2020 at 21:47
  • I am actually passing the same file to both p1 and p2 and it throws an exception only on p2. The error I get it is: Unhandled exception at 0x00007FFE27D0A839 in mypython_test.exe: Microsoft C++ exception: pybind11::error_already_set at memory location 0x0000009827F5F9B8. The returned object PyObject *obj = PyImport_ImportModule(name); is NULL. Feb 6, 2020 at 21:51
  • 1
    If PyImport_ImportModule returns NULL, that means the module can not be found. To simplify testing, use a module that for sure exists, such as eg. sys. Feb 6, 2020 at 22:27
  • 2
    Looks like a reference counting problem in or (in a module used by) pybind_test1.py. The error is b/c this predicate (Py_REFCNT(type) != 0) fails for the PyStructSequence type. Note that the Python interpreter never offloads shared libraries, even if the extension module such library represents is fully removed, so any data objects stick around, and apparently the ref-count isn't properly reduced. Some delta-debugging on pybind_test1.py, removing parts to find the offending code, would allow pin-pointing the problematic one (but you may be unable to do anything about it). Feb 6, 2020 at 23:24

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