10

Java's getOrDefault was a nice construct for one line access to a map value or the starting point if one does not exist. I do not see anything in the map reference in C++ with a parallel. Does something exist or is it build your own?

I have objects in the map that I would update if they exist, but construct new if they do not. With getOrDefault, I could construct the object on the default side, or access it if it exists.

http://www.cplusplus.com/reference/map/map/

https://www.geeksforgeeks.org/hashmap-getordefaultkey-defaultvalue-method-in-java-with-examples/

11
  • Do you want to return a reference or a value?
    – L. F.
    Feb 7, 2020 at 4:45
  • Here is the same question stackoverflow.com/questions/45389872/… except the default is an optional Feb 7, 2020 at 4:48
  • map.at() function will throw an exception if the item isn't found. But the map [] operator inserts a default constructed value if it doesn't exist and returns that. So you probably want auto v = (m.find(k)!=m.end()?m[k]:"default") except that is ridiculously long and complicated compared to an elvis operator. Feb 7, 2020 at 4:49
  • I should have said more about my intended use. I have objects in the map that I would update if they exist, but construct new if they do not. With getOrDefault, I could construct the object on the default side, or access it if it exists.
    – Evan
    Feb 7, 2020 at 4:52
  • I don't ever want an optional, I either want a newly constructed object with some parameters I pass based on the current situation, or the object that was already in the map.
    – Evan
    Feb 7, 2020 at 4:52

6 Answers 6

5

I have objects in the map that I would update if they exist, but construct new if they do not. With getOrDefault, I could construct the object on the default side, or access it if it exists.

Use emplace.

auto& element = *map.emplace(key, value).first;

emplace inserts a new element if the key is not present, and returns a pair consisting of an iterator to the element (inserted or already existent) and a bool value indicating whether insertion took place.

3
  • Thanks, that was the function I was looking for. It was staring me in the face and I missed it.
    – Evan
    Feb 7, 2020 at 5:28
  • 2
    @Evan Is this really what you want? getOrDefault is get or default, it's not get or insert-and-then-get? That is, getOrDefault never inserts into the map.
    – Barry
    Feb 7, 2020 at 13:41
  • @Barry, that is absolutely true, but in this case my intention was to insert the object I constructed in the map if it did not already exist and update it if it did. Getting the reference back along with a bool indicating whether it existed allowed me to do what I want. This was my most common use case for getOrDefault anyway.
    – Evan
    Feb 7, 2020 at 23:49
4

I got here when I was trying to figure out a way to solve LeetCode Single Number question using HashTable in C++.

There is no direct alternative to getOrDefault which is used in Approach 2 and Java, but I was able to use operator[] to access an element of an unordered_map. See http://www.cplusplus.com/reference/unordered_map/unordered_map/operator[]/

If the key exists in the map, then the operator[] will return the reference to its mapped value.

If the key does not exist, then the operator[] will add the key to the map with a value 0.

This could be useful when you are trying to increment a value of a key if it already exists or add a new key to the map if it does not.

For example, I used the following in C++

for (int i : nums) { hash_table[i] = hash_table[i] + 1; }

which is an alternative to the following in Java

for (int i : nums) { hash_table.put(i, hash_table.getOrDefault(i, 0) + 1); }

0
1

The answer of L.F is using map::emplace is the way to go if the map's value type does not require a constructor, as each time the constructor is called as shown in the example below.

C++17 comes with insert_or_assign which is slightly different.

Probably the most efficient solution is to do something like this:

template <class M, class Vp>
std::pair<typename M::iterator, bool> insert_or_create(M& map, typename M::key_type&& k, Vp&& v) {
    auto p = map.lower_bound(k);
    if (p != map.end()) {
        return std::make_pair(p, false);
    }
    return std::make_pair(map.emplace_hint(p, std::move(k), std::forward<Vp>(v)), true);
}

Here is an example that shows how it works:

#include <sstream>
#include <iostream>
#include <string>
#include <map>

class Element {
public:
    Element(int value) : value(value) {
        std::cout << "Element ctor value = " + std::to_string(value) << std::endl;
    }
    int value;
};


template <class M, class Vp>
std::pair<typename M::iterator, bool> insert_or_create(M& map, typename M::key_type&& k, Vp&& v) {
    auto p = map.lower_bound(k);
    if (p != map.end()) {
        return std::make_pair(p, false);
    }
    return std::make_pair(map.emplace_hint(p, std::move(k), std::forward<Vp>(v)), true);
}

int main(int argc, char **argv) {
    std::map<int, Element> map;

    auto& e1 = *map.emplace(1, Element(1)).first;
    std::cout << "Element in map: " << std::to_string(e1.second.value) << std::endl;
    auto& e11 = *map.emplace(1, Element(11)).first;
    std::cout << "Element in map: " << std::to_string(e11.second.value) << std::endl;

    auto e2 = *map.insert_or_assign(2, 2).first;
    std::cout << "Element in map: " << std::to_string(e2.second.value) << std::endl;
    auto e22 = *map.insert_or_assign(2, 22).first;
    std::cout << "Element in map: " << std::to_string(e22.second.value) << std::endl;

    auto e3 = *insert_or_create(map, 3, 3).first;
    std::cout << "Element in map: " << std::to_string(e3.second.value) << std::endl;

    auto e33 = *insert_or_create(map, 3, 33).first;
    std::cout << "Element in map: " << std::to_string(e33.second.value) << std::endl;
}

which produces

Element ctor value = 1
Element in map: 1
Element ctor value = 11       <-- calling ctor, not optimized away   
Element in map: 1             <-- still old value in map as expected 
Element ctor value = 2
Element in map: 2
Element ctor value = 22       <-- calling ctor  
Element in map: 22            <-- new value assigned to key 2, as expected
Element ctor value = 3
Element in map: 3             <-- ctor not called as wanted!!!!!!   
Element in map: 3

This shows that insert_or_create does not call the constructor of Element.

I am not sure why such a function is not in the std::map interface as it is pretty useful.

1
  • Thanks for dusting this question off and adding new information. +1
    – Evan
    Jun 8, 2022 at 16:38
0

Maybe I'm misunderstanding what you're asking, but that's how map works.

map<int, string> m;
string s = m[3];

will set s to a default-constructed string.

When you use operator[] to look up an key in a map, it will always hand you back an value. If the key doesn't exist in the map, it will insert it, with a default constructed value.

If you want this behavior, but with a different value (not a default-constructed value), then you could use emplace, as L.F. has suggested.

1
  • Right, I need something not default constructed. L.F.'s answer was exactly what I was looking for.
    – Evan
    Feb 7, 2020 at 5:37
0
  • Java

    map.put(sum, map.getOrDefault(value, 0) + 1);

  • Equivalent code in c++

    auto it1 = map.find(value);
    if (it1 != um.end())
        map[value]++;
    else
        map[value] = 1;
0

I think below is what you are looking for

mymap.emplace(key, DEFAULT_VALUE).first->second = value;

like used in below sample

    #define DEFAULT_VALUE 0
    map<int,int> mymap;
    mymap[1] = 1;
    // mymap is having some entries.

    // will increment existing element.
    mymap.emplace(1,DEFAULT_VALUE).first->second++; 

    // will insert a new element with key 2 and value as default(0), than increment it.
    mymap.emplace(2,DEFAULT_VALUE).first->second++; 

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service and acknowledge you have read our privacy policy.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.