32

Is it valid to copy a struct some of whose members are not initialized?

I suspect it is undefined behavior, but if so, it makes leaving any uninitialized members in a struct (even if those members are never used directly) quite dangerous. So I wonder if there is something in the standard that allows it.

For instance, is this valid?

struct Data {
  int a, b;
};

int main() {
  Data data;
  data.a = 5;
  Data data2 = data;
}
1
  • I recall seeing a similar question a while ago but can't find it. This question is related as is this one. Commented Feb 7, 2020 at 13:50

4 Answers 4

25

Yes, if the uninitialized member is not an unsigned narrow character type or std::byte, then copying a struct containing this indeterminate value with the implicitly defined copy constructor is technically undefined behavior, as it is for copying a variable with indeterminate value of the same type, because of [dcl.init]/12.

This applies here, because the implicitly generated copy constructor is, except for unions, defined to copy each member individually as if by direct-initialization, see [class.copy.ctor]/4.

This is also subject of the active CWG issue 2264.

I suppose in practice you will not have any problem with that, though.

If you want to be 100% sure, using std::memcpy always has well-defined behavior if the type is trivially copyable, even if members have indeterminate value.


These issues aside, you should always initialize your class members properly with a specified value at construction anyway, assuming you don't require the class to have a trivial default constructor. You can do so easily using the default member initializer syntax to e.g. value-initialize the members:

struct Data {
  int a{}, b{};
};

int main() {
  Data data;
  data.a = 5;
  Data data2 = data;
}
11
  • well.. that struct isn't a POD (Plain old data)? That means the members will be initialized with default values? It's a doubt Commented Feb 7, 2020 at 12:30
  • Isn't it the shallow copy in this this case? what can go wrong with this unless uninitialized member is accessed in the copied struct? Commented Feb 7, 2020 at 12:32
  • @KevinKouketsu I have added a condition for the case where a trivial/POD type is required.
    – walnut
    Commented Feb 7, 2020 at 12:32
  • @TruthSeeker The standard says that it is undefined behavior. The reason it is generally undefined behavior for (non-member) variables is explained in the answer by AndreySemashev. Basically it is to support trap representations with uninitialized memory. Whether this is intended to apply to implicit copy construction of structs is the question of the linked CWG issue.
    – walnut
    Commented Feb 7, 2020 at 12:35
  • @TruthSeeker The implicit copy constructor is defined to copy each member individually as if by direct initialization. It is not defined to copy the object representation as if by memcpy, even for trivially copyable types. The only exception are unions, for which the implicit copy constructor does copy the object representation as if by memcpy.
    – walnut
    Commented Feb 7, 2020 at 12:37
13

In general, copying uninitialized data is undefined behavior because that data may be in a trapping state. Quoting this page:

If an object representation does not represent any value of the object type, it is known as trap representation. Accessing a trap representation in any way other than reading it through an lvalue expression of character type is undefined behavior.

Signalling NaNs are possible for floating point types, and on some platforms integers may have trap representations.

However, for trivially copyable types it is possible to use memcpy to copy the raw representation of the object. Doing so is safe since the value of the object is not interpreted, and instead the raw byte sequence of the object representation is copied.

1
  • Comments are not for extended discussion; this conversation has been moved to chat. Commented Jun 30, 2020 at 13:10
0

In some cases, such as the one described, the C++ Standard allows compilers to process constructs in whatever fashion their customers would find most useful, without requiring that behavior be predictable. In other words, such constructs invoke "Undefined Behavior". That doesn't imply, however, that such constructs are meant to be "forbidden" since the C++ Standard explicitly waives jurisdiction over what well-formed programs are "allowed" to do. While I'm unaware of any published Rationale document for the C++ Standard, the fact that it describes Undefined Behavior much like C89 does would suggest the intended meaning is similar: "Undefined behavior gives the implementor license not to catch certain program errors that are difficult to diagnose. It also identifies areas of possible conforming language extension: the implementor may augment the language by providing a definition of the officially undefined behavior".

There are many situations where the most efficient way to process something would involve writing the parts of a structure that downstream code is going to care about, while omitting those that downstream code isn't going to care about. Requiring that programs initialize all members of a structure, including those that nothing is ever going to care about, would needlessly impede efficiency.

Further, there are some situations where it may be most efficient to have uninitialized data behave in non-deterministic fashion. For example, given:

struct q { unsigned char dat[256]; } x,y;

void test(unsigned char *arr, int n)
{
  q temp;
  for (int i=0; i<n; i++)
    temp.dat[arr[i]] = i;
  x=temp;
  y=temp;
}

if downstream code won't care about the values of any elements of x.dat or y.dat whose indices weren't listed in arr, the code might be optimized to:

void test(unsigned char *arr, int n)
{
  q temp;
  for (int i=0; i<n; i++)
  {
    int it = arr[i];
    x.dat[index] = i;
    y.dat[index] = i;
  }
}

This improvement in efficiency wouldn't be possible if programmers were required to explicitly write every element of temp.dat, including those downstream wouldn't care about, before copying it.

On the other hand, there are some applications where it's important to avoid the possibility of data leakage. In such applications, it may be useful to either have a version of the code that's instrumented to trap any attempt to copy uninitialized storage without regard for whether downstream code would look at it, or it might be useful to have an implementation guarantee that any storage whose contents could be leaked would get zeroed or otherwise overwritten with non-confidential data.

From what I can tell, the C++ Standard makes no attempt to say that any of these behaviors is sufficiently more useful than the other as to justify mandating it. Ironically, this lack of specification may be intended to facilitate optimization, but if programmers can't exploit any kind of weak behavioral guarantees, any optimizations will be negated.

2
  • IMHO some people are too sensitive about UB. Your answer makes sense. Commented Dec 11, 2021 at 18:49
  • 1
    @InnocentBystander: Around 2005, it became fashionable to ignore the distinction between what conforming compilers could do, versus what general-purpose compilers should do, and also to prioritize the efficiency with which an implementation could process "fully portable" programs, as opposed to the efficiency with which it could most efficiently accomplish the tasks at hand (which might entail the use of constructs which are "non-portable" but widely supported).
    – supercat
    Commented Dec 11, 2021 at 22:11
-2

Since all members of the Data are of primitive types, data2 will get exact "bit-by-bit copy" of the all members of data. So the value of data2.b will be exactly the same as value of the data.b. However, exact value of the data.b cannot be predicted, because you have not initialized it explicitly. It will depend on values of the bytes in the memory region allocated for the data.

22
  • 1
    The fragment you quote talks about the behavior of memmove, but it's not really relevant here because in my code I'm using the copy constructor, not memmove. The other answers imply that using the copy constructor results in undefined behavior. I think you also misunderstand the term "undefined behavior". It means that the language provides no guarantees at all, e.g. the program might crash or corrupt data randomly or do anything. It doesn't just mean that some value is unpredictable, that would be unspecified behavior. Commented Feb 13, 2020 at 17:07
  • 1
    @TomekCzajka: Of course, according to the authors of the Standard, UB "...identifies areas of possible conforming language extension: the implementor may augment the language by providing a definition of the officially undefined behavior." There's a crazy myth that says the authors of the Standard used "Implementation-Defined Behavior" for that purpose, but such a notion is flatly contradicted by what they actually wrote.
    – supercat
    Commented Feb 14, 2020 at 23:00
  • 1
    @TomekCzajka: In situations where a behavior that was defined by an earlier standard becomes undefined in a later one, the intention of the Committee was generally not to deprecate the old behavior, but rather to say that if an implementation could best serve its customers by doing something else, the Committee didn't want to forbid them from doing so. A major point of confusion with the Standard stems from a lack of consensus among Committee members as to its intended jurisdiction. Most requirements for programs are only applicable to Strictly Conforming Programs...
    – supercat
    Commented Feb 15, 2020 at 16:33
  • 1
    @TomekCzajka: I think the Standard could best fit practical reality if it were to recognize that objects whose stored value is accessed via valid pointers must behave as though stored using the defined representation, but stored values that are not accessible via pointers may use other representations that could have trap values even if the defined representations do not. This would allow for the possibility that e.g. an automatic-duration struct with two uint16_t values might be stored using two 32-bit registers whose values would not be initialized, and which might behave oddly...
    – supercat
    Commented Feb 15, 2020 at 16:42
  • 1
    @InnocentBystander: The phrase "trap representation" doesn't just refer to things that trigger CPU traps when accessed, but also applies to objects whose representation may violate a compiler's expected invariants in ways whose consequences may be much worse than an OS trap. For example, given uint1 = ushort1; ... if (uint1 < 70000) foo[uint1] = 123;, a compiler might generate code that will always make uint1 be less than 70000 on that path, it might generate code where uint1 might hold a value bigger than 69999 but perform the comparison and skip the assignment if it was, or it might...
    – supercat
    Commented Dec 12, 2021 at 18:44

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