-1

Bonjour, Je fais un script sh mais je n'arrive pas à avoir le résultat souhaité en effet j'ai un fichier texte du style

toto
tata
§
toto
tata
§
tati
§
toto

et je voudrais le résulat suivant

2 
toto
tata
1
tati
1
toto

Pour avoir les lignes uniques avec leur fréquence d'apparition, la commande :

cat file.txt | sort | uniq -c 

fonctionnait, mais comme j'ai des blocs de lignes je n'arrive pas à trouver la solution

Si quelqu'un a une idée

3
  • Please tag for either sh or bash, not both. The bash tag applies one could, f/e, store the counter in an associative array; the sh tag implies one can't. As such, using both creates an ambiguous question. Feb 7 '20 at 17:10
  • BTW, what restrictions do you have around allowed characters? If you replace your newlines with something else and your §s with newlines, well, there you are. Feb 7 '20 at 17:11
  • Bonjour. Please translate your question to English. For better or worse, SO expects questions and answers in English. Surprisingly, there isn't, AFAIK, a Stack Overflow en Français site. Feb 17 '20 at 2:49
1

GNU *tools have -z or -0 options to parse zero terminated strings. So it works in simple stages:

  1. Convert your § separated stream into zero separated stream.
  2. Handle it as zero separated stream.
  3. Format for requested output.

So:

# convert §\n into zero byte
sed -z 's/§\n/\x00/g' |
# sort and uniq
sort -z | uniq -z -c |
# extract the number inserted by uniq and output the number with a newline
sed 's/\(^\|\x00\) *\([0-9]\+\) /\2\n/g'

outputs tested on repl:

1
tati
1
toto
2
toto
tata

If you wish the count 2 to be on the first line, you could for example sort the output of uniq with sort numerically on the first field in reverse, lik this:

sed -z 's/§\n/\x00/g' |
sort -z | uniq -z -c |
sort -z -n -r -k1 |
sed 's/\(^\|\x00\) *\([0-9]\+\) /\2\n/g'

which outputs:

2
toto
tata
1
toto
1
tati

On a posix shell, there is a way around. First convert the stream into parts, and each part is on a separate line with character converted to hex ascii. Then just sort+uniq these parts. And then convert hex into ascii characters back.

{
    # tokenize - extract parts between &
    part=
    while IFS= read -r line; do
        if [ "$line" != '§' ]; then
            part+="$line"$'\n'
        else
            # output part in hex
            printf "%s" "$part" | xxd -p | tr -d '\n'
            echo
            part=""
        fi
    done
    if [ -n "$part" ]; then
        printf "%s" "$part" | xxd -p | tr -d '\n'
    fi
} |
# sort + uniq
sort | uniq -c |
# output count and convert text back to ascii
while IFS=' ' read -r count text; do
    echo "$count"
    printf "%s" "$text" | xxd -r -p
done

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