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I keep finding very strange SwiftUI bugs that only pop up under very specific circumstances 😅. For example, I have a form that is shown as a model sheet. This form has a ViewModel, and shows a UITextView (via UIViewRepresentable and a @Binding - it's all in the code below).

Everything works absolutely fine, you can run the code below and you'll see all the two-way bindings working as expected: type in one field and it changes in the other, and vice-versa. However, as soon as you un-comment the line @Environment(\.presentationMode) private var presentationMode, then the two-way binding in the TextView breaks. You will also notice that the ViewModel prints "HERE" twice.

What the hell is going on? My guess is that as soon as ContentView shows the modal, the value of presentationMode changes, which then re-renders the sheet (so, FormView). That would explain the duplicate "HERE" getting logged. But, why does that break the two-way text binding?

One workaround is to not use a ViewModel, and simply have an @State property directly in the FormView. But that is not a great solution as I have a bunch of logic in my real-world form, which I don't want to move to the form view. So, does anyone have a better solution?

import SwiftUI
import UIKit

struct TextView: UIViewRepresentable {
  @Binding var text: String

  func makeCoordinator() -> Coordinator {
    Coordinator(self)
  }

  func makeUIView(context: Context) -> UITextView {
    let uiTextView = UITextView()
    uiTextView.delegate = context.coordinator
    return uiTextView
  }

  func updateUIView(_ uiView: UITextView, context: Context) {
    uiView.text = self.text
  }

  class Coordinator : NSObject, UITextViewDelegate {
    var parent: TextView

    init(_ view: TextView) {
      self.parent = view
    }

    func textViewDidChange(_ textView: UITextView) {
      self.parent.text = textView.text
    }

    func textViewDidEndEditing(_ textView: UITextView) {
      self.parent.text = textView.text
    }
  }
}

struct ContentView: View {
  @State private var showForm = false
  //@Environment(\.presentationMode) private var presentationMode

  var body: some View {
    NavigationView {
      Text("Hello")
      .navigationBarItems(trailing: trailingNavigationBarItem)
    }
    .sheet(isPresented: $showForm) {
      FormView()
    }
  }

  private var trailingNavigationBarItem: some View {
    Button("Form") {
      self.showForm = true
    }
  }
}

struct FormView: View {
  @ObservedObject private var viewModel = ViewModel()

  var body: some View {
    NavigationView {
      Form {
        Section(header: Text(viewModel.text)) {
          TextView(text: $viewModel.text)
            .frame(height: 200)
        }

        Section(header: Text(viewModel.text)) {
          TextField("Text", text: $viewModel.text)
        }
      }
    }
  }
}

class ViewModel: ObservableObject {
  @Published var text = ""

  init() {
    print("HERE")
  }
}
  • Why would you need presentationMode in ContentView? Isn't it root view? If I place presentationMode in FormView, as would intended to close it, then everything works as expected. – Asperi Feb 9 at 7:15
  • No, it’s not the root view in my real app. Just believe me that it’s needed there :) ContentView is pushed onto a NavigationView and needs to be able to pop itself programmatically. – Kevin Renskers Feb 9 at 11:09
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I finally found a workaround: store the ViewModel on the ContentView, not on the FormView, and pass it in to the FormView.

struct ContentView: View {
  @State private var showForm = false
  @Environment(\.presentationMode) private var presentationMode

  private let viewModel = ViewModel()

  var body: some View {
    NavigationView {
      Text("Hello")
      .navigationBarItems(trailing: trailingNavigationBarItem)
    }
    .sheet(isPresented: $showForm) {
      FormView(viewModel: self.viewModel)
    }
  }

  private var trailingNavigationBarItem: some View {
    Button("Form") {
      self.showForm = true
    }
  }
}

struct FormView: View {
  @ObservedObject var viewModel: ViewModel

  var body: some View {
    NavigationView {
      Form {
        Section(header: Text(viewModel.text)) {
          TextView(text: $viewModel.text)
            .frame(height: 200)
        }

        Section(header: Text(viewModel.text)) {
          TextField("Text", text: $viewModel.text)
        }
      }
    }
  }
}

class ViewModel: ObservableObject {
  @Published var text = ""

  init() {
    print("HERE")
  }
}

The only thing is that the ViewModel is now instantiated right when the ContentView is opened, even if you never open the FormView. Feels a bit wasteful. Especially when you have a big List, with NavigationLinks to a bunch of detail pages, which now all create their presented-as-a-sheet FormView's ViewModel up front, even if you never leave the List page.

Sadly I can't turn the ViewModel into a struct, as I actually need to (asynchronously) mutate state and then eventually I run into the Escaping closure captures mutating 'self' parameter compiler error. Sigh. So yeah, I am stuck with using a class.

The root of the issue is still that FormView is instantiated twice (because of @Environment(\.presentationMode)), which causes two ViewModels to be created as well (which my workaround solves by passing in one copy to both FormViews basically). But it's still weird that this broke @Binding, since the standard TextFields did work as expected.

There are still a lot of weird gotcha's like this with SwiftUI, I really hope this becomes simpler to manage soon. If anyone can explain the behavior of sheets, ObservableObject classes (viewmodels), @Environment(\.presentationMode) and @Binding put together, I'm all ears.

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