8

I am developing a win form app and I found myself constantly requiring to access methods in my parent form say Form1 from another class be it a form class or just a class. I have some initializers in the constructor of my form 1 and hence I am not able to create an instance of the Form1. So I am not able to access the methods of Form1.

So I feel like this is a bad practice. However, there are certain instances that I don't know what else to do for instance consider this scenario. I have a class called ProcessData in which I have a method which receives a file, reads it line by line and process the data. Now I'm calling this method as a thread from my main form Form1. My requirement is as the data process I want to show the line currently under process in a multiline textbox in the main form Form1.

Previously what I did have I had everything in the same Form1 so I used a delegate, like

delegate void SetTextCallback(string text, Control ctrl);
private void SetText(string text, Control ctrl)
    {
        if (ctrl.InvokeRequired)
        {
            SetTextCallback d = new SetTextCallback(SetText);
            this.Invoke(d, new object[] { text, ctrl });
        }
        else
        {
            if (ctrl.GetType() == typeof(Label))
            {
                ctrl.Text = text;
            }
            else
            {
                ctrl.Text += Environment.NewLine + text;
            }
        }
    }

and I invoked this like SetText("text",Label1);

but if I am calling this from another class to refer Label1 I will need an instance of Form1 but I will not be able to create it, so what is the best practice to do it?

(I know I can just pass the text to SetText and handle the control there but I am going to use this same thing for a variety of textbox and label controls invoked from different classes)

2
  • If you were using WPF, Commands would be a good choice but ... In any case, the child should be "decoupled" or require no knowledge of the parent. It's not just a reuse thing, it makes bugs easier to avoid and fix.
    – Jodrell
    May 16, 2011 at 11:52
  • 1
    If you really didn't want to use events, for wahtever reason. The child should declare the delegate type and accept an instance as a parameter; the parent can implement the delegate and pass an instance to the child, the thread checking should be in the parent. Like writing your own event. I'm not suggesting this as an answer.
    – Jodrell
    May 16, 2011 at 12:01

3 Answers 3

6

The way that I normally do this is to have the child form expose events corresponding to the logical actions and events on that form, for example:

/// <summary>
/// Occurrs when an item is selected in the form
/// </summary>
public event EventHandler<ItemSelectedEventArgs> ItemSelected;

/// <summary>
/// Fires the <see cref="ItemSelected" /> event
/// </summary>
protected void OnItemSelected(MyItem item) 
{
    var handler = this.ItemSelected;
    if (handler != null)
    {
        ItemSelectedEventArgs args = new ItemSelectedEventArgs();
        args.Item = item; // For example
        handler(this, args);
    }
}

The idea is that the logic of your parent form should respond to actions on your child form, rather than actions on your child form driving actions on the parent form - you should try to encapsulate the forms logic as much as possible (aka separation of concerns).

Also as a pattern it should be the parent / calling form that handles marshalling the calls across to the correct thread via InvokeRequired etc... rather than the child form - this will be unneccessary anyway unless you are doing work on background threads.

5

Your class should raise events and your form should have the event handlers. This keeps your form code in your form and your class code in your class. Nice and neat.

2

Raising events, as suggested by Kragen and Richard will work, and stops the parent/child relationship from being as tightly coupled, but if you want something really flexible, look into the Event Aggregator pattern. There is a nice one provided in the Prism project here, although a lot of people find it inconvenient to use, and have created extensions in order to make it easier to work with such as this, or written their own from scratch such as this.

Basically, the idea is that the parent doesn't even care that the message came from its child window. The child window has merely thrown a message such as "Open Order #6" onto the message bus, assuming that someone else will handle it, pretty much the same as raising an event. Elsewhere, the parent form, which is responsible for containing all the child forms has subscribed to "Open Order" messages, and so it receives the message, and opens a new child window for Order #6.

Since the parent isn't directly "welded" to the child anymore, it's possible for these messages to originate elsewhere as well, now. You could raise "Open Order" messages from a most-recently-used list on the parent form itself, or in reaction to a hyperlink in some other form being clicked. It no longer matters who asked for order #6 to be opened, only that someone did. It's a highly flexible model that eliminates a lot of tight coupling.

2
  • this looks interesting, but for my scope i think i would go with events itself. Ill have a look at it later.
    – swordfish
    May 17, 2011 at 3:26
  • Yes, for a simple case, the events will do just fine. What you'll eventually find is that hooking up to all the different events gets to be a pain. Once you use an aggregator, I'm afraid there's no turning back, by which I mean you'll be hooked. In the meantime, I would advise that you don't raise specific events like grid1_SelectionChanged. The controller, parent form, or whatever is "listening" to the events really doesn't need that level of detail. Whether the data was in a grid or list really isn't its concern. Raise events like OrderSelectionChanged that hide HOW it happened.
    – Mel
    May 17, 2011 at 12:22

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service and acknowledge you have read our privacy policy.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.