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There are other similar SO questions out there, but none that really answer my specific question:

If an MVC controller is created for every request then what is the advantage of DbContext being per-request (assuming I’m injecting it into the controller)? Wouldn’t transient achieve the same result?

For example, say I have a data entry/edit form - the controller would have a ‘get’ method to retrieve the entity to be edited from the db, and a ‘post’ method to save back to the db (this would involve retrieving the entity again, update the changed values, then SaveChanges). Get and Post are separate requests, so I don’t see how a per-request DbContext helps here.

What am I missing? In what scenarios is a per-request DbContext useful?

  • It depends to the requirements. You can use transient DbContext and whenever you need a shared DbContext share it explicitly through implementing a pattern like Unit of Work. – Reza Aghaei Feb 9 at 13:01
  • A simple failure example of scoped DbContext is a case that you try to Attach an entity twice, without knowing the db context has been shared with another class (without your information) and previous class has already loaded the entity in the context. The try to attach will fail. – Reza Aghaei Feb 9 at 13:06
  • Another failure example of scoped DbContext possibility of unintended SaveChanges. One class may change context but for some reason don't want to save changes then if the class don't rollback all changes, another class later may call SaveChanges and unintentionally saves those unwanted chagnes as well. – Reza Aghaei Feb 9 at 13:16
  • Read more about ServiceLifeTime configuration of DbContext – Reza Aghaei Feb 9 at 13:41
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In the simplest examples where you have a GET and POST method in a controller, and nothing more, there is no difference between using Transient and Per-Request. Where Per-Request comes in is when your controller hands off to other classes to do related work. A common example is a repository pattern, but really any service/helper class that centralizes shared behaviour applies as well. If the DbContext is Transient and you call one of these services passing an entity that the controller had retrieved from the DbContext and those services access a DbContext, they will be using a different instance of a DbContext than the Controller did. This can lead to pretty annoying issues with entity tracking and attempts to insert duplicate rows because the controller's DbContext instance isn't tracking entities that might have been loaded by another DbContext and associated to the entity the controller's instance was tracking. By using an instance per-request, any associated class that requests a DbContext will receive the same instance which negates these issues.

Even if all operations are somewhat atomic from each other, having a single instance means that these changes will all be committed or rolled back together. While this is typically a desired behaviour, this can itself lead to unexpected issues because the question comes up as to when should SaveChanges be called? When you have a controller calling various common methods and a DbContext is scoped per-request, if any of those methods call SaveChanges, everything done up to that point would be attempted to commit to the DB. So you can run into issues where you call 3 common service methods that each call a SaveChanges, the first 2 succeed with no issue, but the 3rd one fails. Typically you expect the Controller to have the final say to perform the commit and handle the exceptions. In these cases it can be beneficial to utilize a Unit of Work to "encase" the DbContext and ensure that the commit or rollback decision of the DbContext is maintained at the highest level of the operation. This way the UoW can be scoped at the start of the request (I.e. Controller method), and the supporting services etc. receive their DbContext reference from the UoW, but the controller gets the final say if/when the UoW SaveChanges gets called.

  • Cheers. I had only been thinking in terms of my contrived example. It was only after posting my question that I started thinking of more realistic scenarios where a controller action might need to call multiple service layer methods, all wrapped up in a transaction. – Andrew Stephens Feb 10 at 13:43
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Wouldn’t transient achieve the same result?

Yes, but that's only if you know for sure that the only Resolve<DbContext>() call is in your controller (preferably through constructor injection), and from there the instance is being passed on to another layers.

Obviously, that's not always the case.

There can always be another "resolving points" in your code (MVC filters, service layers called indirectly, or even code that uses IoC in Service Locator mode), and in those case you typically would want to ensure the use of the same DbContext instance throughout the HTTP request.

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In addition to @haim770s answer:

Why is DbContext per-request?

One of the reasons why Transient might be not suited is that you'll get a new DbContext for every service/repository/command/query or UnitOfWork object you create or request.

If you cascade some updates, ensuring 1 DbContext per request, makes it easier to rollback all these updates, e.g. as an transaction or UnitOfWork - per request.

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Scoped DbContext vs. Transient DbContext - The difference

Scoped DbContext Implicitly shares a single instance of your DbContext in scope of request. It means, during lifetime of a request, all the classes which try to get an instance of DbContext receive a shared single instance of the DbContext.

For example if for any reason, an action, an action filter or a few business logic classes try to get an instance of your DbContext in a request, they all will get a shared single instance.

Transient DbContext means each class which try to get an instance of the DbContext receives a fresh new instance, not sharing implicitly by any class else.

For example if for any reason, an action, an action filter or a few business logic classes try to get an instance of your DbContext, they all get fresh new different instances.


So the difference is clear now. Right? Let's take a look at some considerations when using Scoped or Transient.

Considerations - Choose Scoped DbContext or Transient DbContext?

Default - When using AddDbContext method, Scoped is default if you don't specify a service lifetime.

Performance - Performance-wise Scoped is better because it creates less instances. But if you don't create multiple instances then there will be no differences. For example if you have implemented Unit of Work pattern yourself and create an instance of DbContext in Service Layer for each request, there is no difference between scoped and transient.

Implicitly Shared - Since Scoped is shared implicitly, while adding simplicity of sharing and performance improvements, but you need to use it with caution. I'll share a few scenarios which Scoped may fail and needs more attention:

  • Attach - A simple failure example of Scoped DbContext is a case that you try to Attach an entity twice, without knowing the db context has been shared with another class (without your information) and previous class has already loaded the entity in the context. The try to attach will fail.

  • SaveChanges - Another failure example of Scoped DbContext possibility of unintended SaveChanges. One class may change context but for some reason don't want to save changes then if the class don't rollback all changes, another class later may call SaveChanges and unintentionally saves those unwanted changes as well.

  • Multi Thread - If you use multiple threads to access DbContext in the same request, you need more caution. According to the documentations, any code that explicitly executes multiple threads in parallel should ensure that DbContext instances aren't ever accessed concurrently. It means you need to use Transient or if you registered the the context as Scoped, then you need to create scopes (using IServiceScopeFactory) for each thread. You can take a look at Implicitly sharing DbContext instances across multiple threads via dependency injection.

  • You should be really careful if you decide to use Scoped. I understand reading long posts are somehow boring, but make sure you understand the examples which show some potential problems while using Scoped. In addition, when you have implemented Unit of Work yourself, in general it's not a good idea to use Scoped. – Reza Aghaei Feb 10 at 13:48

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