10

I am working with Matlab.

I have a binary square matrix. For each row, there is one or more entries of 1. I want to go through each row of this matrix and return the index of those 1s and store them in the entry of a cell.

I was wondering if there is a way to do this without looping over all the rows of this matrix, as for loop is really slow in Matlab.

For example, my matrix

M = 0 1 0
    1 0 1
    1 1 1 

Then eventually, I want something like

A = [2]
    [1,3]
    [1,2,3]

So A is a cell.

Is there a way to achieve this goal without using for loop, with the aim of calculating the result more quickly?

5
  • Do you want the result to be fast or do you want the result to avoid for loops? For this problem, with modern versions of MATLAB, I strongly suspect a for loop to be the fastest solution. If you have a performance problem I suspect you're looking in the wrong place for the solution based on outdated advice.
    – Will
    Feb 10 '20 at 10:23
  • @Will I want the results to be fast. My matrix is very big. The run time is about 30s in my computer by using for loop. I want to know if there are some clever vectorization operations or, mapReduce, etc that can increase the speed.
    – ftxx
    Feb 10 '20 at 10:28
  • 1
    I suspect, you can't. Vectorization works on accurately described vectors and matrices, but your result allows for vectors of different lengths. Thus, my assumption is, that you'll always have some explicit loop or some loop-in-disguise like cellfun.
    – HansHirse
    Feb 10 '20 at 10:36
  • @ftxx how big? And how many 1s in a typical row? I wouldn't expect a find loop to take anything close to 30s for anything small enough to fit on physical memory.
    – Will
    Feb 10 '20 at 10:51
  • @ftxx Please see my updated answer, I've edited since it was accepted with a minor performance improvement
    – Wolfie
    Feb 10 '20 at 11:55
11

At the bottom of this answer is some benchmarking code, since you clarified that you're interested in performance rather than arbitrarily avoiding for loops.

In fact, I think for loops are probably the most performant option here. Since the "new" (2015b) JIT engine was introduced (source) for loops are not inherently slow - in fact they are optimised internally.

You can see from the benchmark that the mat2cell option offered by ThomasIsCoding here is very slow...

Comparison 1

If we get rid of that line to make the scale clearer, then my splitapply method is fairly slow, obchardon's accumarray option is a bit better, but the fastest (and comparable) options are either using arrayfun (as also suggested by Thomas) or a for loop. Note that arrayfun is basically a for loop in disguise for most use-cases, so this isn't a surprising tie!

Comparison 2

I would recommend you use a for loop for increased code readability and the best performance.

Edit:

If we assume that looping is the fastest approach, we can make some optimisations around the find command.

Specifically

  • Make M logical. As the below plot shows, this can be faster for relatively small M, but slower with the trade-off of type conversion for large M.

  • Use a logical M to index an array 1:size(M,2) instead of using find. This avoids the slowest part of the loop (the find command) and outweighs the type conversion overhead, making it the quickest option.

Here is my recommendation for best performance:

function A = f_forlooplogicalindexing( M )
    M = logical(M);
    k = 1:size(M,2);
    N = size(M,1);
    A = cell(N,1);
    for r = 1:N
        A{r} = k(M(r,:));
    end
end

I've added this to the benchmark below, here is the comparison of loop-style approaches:

Comparison 3

Benchmarking code:

rng(904); % Gives OP example for randi([0,1],3)
p = 2:12; 
T = NaN( numel(p), 7 );
for ii = p
    N = 2^ii;
    M = randi([0,1],N);

    fprintf( 'N = 2^%.0f = %.0f\n', log2(N), N );

    f1 = @()f_arrayfun( M );
    f2 = @()f_mat2cell( M );
    f3 = @()f_accumarray( M );
    f4 = @()f_splitapply( M );
    f5 = @()f_forloop( M );
    f6 = @()f_forlooplogical( M );
    f7 = @()f_forlooplogicalindexing( M );

    T(ii, 1) = timeit( f1 ); 
    T(ii, 2) = timeit( f2 ); 
    T(ii, 3) = timeit( f3 ); 
    T(ii, 4) = timeit( f4 );  
    T(ii, 5) = timeit( f5 );
    T(ii, 6) = timeit( f6 );
    T(ii, 7) = timeit( f7 );
end

plot( (2.^p).', T(2:end,:) );
legend( {'arrayfun','mat2cell','accumarray','splitapply','for loop',...
         'for loop logical', 'for loop logical + indexing'} );
grid on;
xlabel( 'N, where M = random N*N matrix of 1 or 0' );
ylabel( 'Execution time (s)' );

disp( 'Done' );

function A = f_arrayfun( M )
    A = arrayfun(@(r) find(M(r,:)),1:size(M,1),'UniformOutput',false);
end
function A = f_mat2cell( M )
    [i,j] = find(M.');
    A = mat2cell(i,arrayfun(@(r) sum(j==r),min(j):max(j)));
end
function A = f_accumarray( M )
    [val,ind] = ind2sub(size(M),find(M.'));
    A = accumarray(ind,val,[],@(x) {x});
end
function A = f_splitapply( M )
    [r,c] = find(M);
    A = splitapply( @(x) {x}, c, r );
end
function A = f_forloop( M )
    N = size(M,1);
    A = cell(N,1);
    for r = 1:N
        A{r} = find(M(r,:));
    end
end
function A = f_forlooplogical( M )
    M = logical(M);
    N = size(M,1);
    A = cell(N,1);
    for r = 1:N
        A{r} = find(M(r,:));
    end
end
function A = f_forlooplogicalindexing( M )
    M = logical(M);
    k = 1:size(M,2);
    N = size(M,1);
    A = cell(N,1);
    for r = 1:N
        A{r} = k(M(r,:));
    end
end
4
  • 1
    Already saw and upvoted. :-) Still waiting for Luis; he sure has some black MATLAB magic for that.
    – HansHirse
    Feb 10 '20 at 11:37
  • @Hans Haha yeah although his usual bag of tricks (implicit expansion, clever indexing, ...) usually keeps things as matrices, the bottleneck here is summarising in cells
    – Wolfie
    Feb 10 '20 at 11:43
  • 1
    Note that these times are strongly dependent on the sparsity of M. If, for instance, only 5% of elements are populated M = randi([0,20],N) == 20; then the for loop is by far the slowest and your arrayfun method wins.
    – Will
    Feb 10 '20 at 12:14
  • @HansHirse :-) My approach would have been accumarray without ind2sub, but it is slower than the for loop
    – Luis Mendo
    Feb 10 '20 at 12:27
2

You can try arrayfun like below, which sweep through rows of M

A = arrayfun(@(r) find(M(r,:)),1:size(M,1),'UniformOutput',false)

A =
{
  [1,1] =  2
  [1,2] =

     1   3

  [1,3] =

     1   2   3

}

or (a slower approach by mat2cell)

[i,j] = find(M.');
A = mat2cell(i,arrayfun(@(r) sum(j==r),min(j):max(j)))

A =
{
  [1,1] =  2
  [2,1] =

     1
     3

  [3,1] =

     1
     2
     3

}
1
  • 1
    Although arrayfun is basically a loop-in-disguise, so this may fail on both fronts of 1) avoiding loops and 2) being fast, as hoped for by the OP
    – Wolfie
    Feb 10 '20 at 10:58
2

Edit: I added a benchmark, the results show that a for loop is more efficient than accumarray.


You can usefind and accumarray:

[c, r] = find(A');
C = accumarray(r, c, [], @(v) {v'});

The matrix is transposed (A') because find groups by column.

Example:

A = [1 0 0 1 0
     0 1 0 0 0
     0 0 1 1 0
     1 0 1 0 1];

%  Find nonzero rows and colums
[c, r] = find(A');

%  Group row indices for each columns
C = accumarray(r, c, [], @(v) {v'});

% Display cell array contents
celldisp(C)

Output:

C{1} = 
     1     4

C{2} = 
     2

C{3} =
     3     4

C{4} = 
     1     3     5

Benchmark:

m = 10000;
n = 10000;

A = randi([0 1], m,n);

disp('accumarray:')
tic
[c, r] = find(A');
C = accumarray(r, c, [], @(v) {v'});
toc
disp(' ')

disp('For loop:')
tic
C = cell([size(A,1) 1]);
for i = 1:size(A,1)
    C{i} = find(A(i,:));
end
toc

Result:

accumarray:
Elapsed time is 2.407773 seconds.

For loop:
Elapsed time is 1.671387 seconds.

A for loop is more efficient than accumarray...

2
  • This is pretty much the method already proposed by obchardon, no?
    – Wolfie
    Feb 10 '20 at 11:25
  • Yes, I was a little slow, I saw his answer after I posted mine. Feb 10 '20 at 11:27
2

Using accumarray:

M = [0 1 0
     1 0 1
     1 1 1];

[val,ind] = find(M.');

A = accumarray(ind,val,[],@(x) {x});
4
  • 1
    Execution time in Octave and MATLAB Online is about 2x of a simple for loop like: MM{I} = find(M(I, :)).
    – HansHirse
    Feb 10 '20 at 11:30
  • 2
    @Hans you might want to see my answer
    – Wolfie
    Feb 10 '20 at 11:37
  • yeah, since the size of each cell are not the same, this problem can not be fully vectorized (or there is a trick that I have not see). It's only a solution that hide the for loop.
    – obchardon
    Feb 10 '20 at 11:47
  • No need for ind2sub: [ii, jj] = find(M); accumarray(ii, jj, [], @(x){x})
    – Luis Mendo
    Feb 10 '20 at 12:14
2

You can use strfind :

A = strfind(cellstr(char(M)), char(1));
2
  • I (lazily) haven't even looked in the docs, but would this be quicker using actual string types, rather than chars? There are lots of optimisations for strings, hence why they exist...
    – Wolfie
    Feb 10 '20 at 18:05
  • @Wolfie I think numeric arrays are more similar to char arrays than strings so conversion of numeric array to character array should be more straightforward than conversion to string .
    – rahnema1
    Feb 10 '20 at 20:39

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