3

I am trying to understand handling nulls in PostgreSQL's jsonb type. Because of

# select 'null'::jsonb is null;
 ?column? 
----------
 f
(1 row)

I assume that they are different than SQL nulls (which makes sense) - according to the manual,

SQL NULL is a different concept.

Therefore, these two queries are not surprising at all:

# select '{"a": 1, "b": null}'::jsonb->'b' is null;
 ?column? 
----------
 f
(1 row)

# select '{"a": 1, "b": null}'::jsonb->'c' is null;
 ?column? 
----------
 t
(1 row)

per the manual:

The field/element/path extraction operators return NULL, rather than failing, if the JSON input does not have the right structure to match the request; for example if no such element exists.

Where the surprise begins, however, is this:

# select '{"a": 1, "b": null}'::jsonb->>'b' is null;
 ?column? 
----------
 t
(1 row)

# select '{"a": 1, "b": null}'::jsonb->>'c' is null;
 ?column? 
----------
 t
(1 row)

The latter one I can understand - we get an SQL null from the extraction, and casting a null to text leaves it as null - I assume ->> works that way, as the manual says

The field/element/path extraction operators return the same type as their left-hand input (either json or jsonb), except for those specified as returning text, which coerce the value to text.

(BTW, I could not find a confirmation that casting an SQL null to any other type yields null again in PostgreSQL - is it written somewhere explicitly?)

But the former is a mystery to me. The extraction should get me a jsonb null, and I thought casting to text should give me 'null' (i.e., a string saying "null"), just like

# select ('null'::jsonb)::text;
 text 
------
 null
(1 row)

But yet it returns a proper SQL null.

Why is that so?

2
  • What else would it return? It can't return a JSON null, as the operator explicitly does not return JSON at all. It has to apply some mapping, and if not this is one then what?
    – jjanes
    Feb 11, 2020 at 14:21
  • Well, I said that - I expected the string 'null', like in select ('null'::jsonb)::text;...
    – mbork
    Feb 11, 2020 at 14:24

1 Answer 1

2

To some extent this is a matter of opinion of the implementor; when converting between JSON data types and SQL data types, it is not always possible to find a perfect correspondence, particularly since SQL NULL is so weird.

But there is a certain logic to how it is implemented.

SELECT (JSONB '{"a": "null"}' -> 'a')::text,
       (JSONB '{"a": null}' -> 'a')::text;

  text  | text 
--------+------
 "null" | null
(1 row)

Casting to text always produces a result that, when cast back to the original type, produces the original value. That is a design principle in PostgreSQL.

So the JSON string "null" and the JSON null will be cast to different strings.

Now look at this:

SELECT JSONB '{"a": "null"}' ->> 'a',
       JSONB '{"a": null}' ->> 'a';

 ?column? | ?column? 
----------+----------
 null     | 
(1 row)

Here, different to the cast above, PostgreSQL tries to find the closest equivalent of the JSON value in SQL. You wouldn't want the string "null" to retain its double quotes, because that would be quite a different string in SQL, right?

But on the other hand it would also not feel right if "null" and null were represented the same way in SQL, would it?

As far as I know, JSON null means “not there”, and that is one of the meanings of SQL NULL. Also, having a JSON attribute with a value of null means about the same thing as omitting that attribute, doesn't it?

So while there is room for debate, I think there is some rhyme and reason behind the way it is implemented.

3
  • Thanks a lot! This is very interesting, and now makes sense to me. <shameless-plug> Here is my blog entry about it: mbork.pl/2020-02-15_PostgreSQL_and_null_values_in_jsonb </shameless-plug>
    – mbork
    Feb 15, 2020 at 22:43
  • I couldn't find a way to comment on your blog, so I put it here: 1. there is an "inn" instead of an "in", 2. Concerning "casting null to anything results in null (I could not find evidence for this in the PostgreSQL manual, but a few experiments seem to confirm this behavior, and it makes perfect sense)": This is decreed by the SQL standard: "Every data type includes a special value, called the null value, sometimes denoted by the keyword NULL." Feb 17, 2020 at 7:02
  • Thanks! The link to the comment page is at the bottom left, so feel free to leave the comment about NULLs (I fixed the typo).
    – mbork
    Feb 17, 2020 at 14:17

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