8

TypeScript allows you to compose recursive types but gives no insight into how the code changes in lower levels (i.e. depths). The code below, for example, would have the same kind of signature across all levels, and we would have to manually check at each level that there exists a sub property.

type Recurse = { foo: string; sub?: Recurse }

function recurse(depth: number): Recurse {
  if (depth === 0) return { foo: 'hey' }
  return {
    foo: 'hey',
    sub: recurse(depth - 1),
  }
}
const qux = recurse(5)

What I am seeking is a type signature that would give us concrete evidence of what the function returned at a particular depth.

const qux0: { foo: string } = recurse(0)
const qux1: { foo: string, sub: { foo: string } } = recurse(1)
const qux2: { foo: string, sub: {  foo: string, sub: { foo: string }} } = recurse(2)

This way, we would not have to check at every level for the sub property as the type signature already packs that information.

I have a feeling that this might be possible to achieve with conditional types but have no concrete evidence.

Do you have any idea how I could achieve that?

3 Answers 3

8

Until TS allows basic arithmetic operations for number types, you can use a decrement counter like Decr for all recursive types with particular depth:

type Decr = [never, 0, 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10] // add to a reasonable amount

type Recurse<N extends number> = N extends 0 ? 
  { foo: string } : 
  { foo: string; sub: Recurse<Decr[N]> }

function recurse<N extends number>(depth: N): Recurse<N> {
  if (depth === 0) return { foo: 'hey' } as Recurse<N>
  return {
    foo: 'hey',
    sub: recurse(depth - 1),
  } as Recurse<N>
}
type Decr9 = Decr[9] // 8

// compiles now
const qux = recurse(5)
const qux0: { foo: string } = recurse(0)
const qux1: { foo: string, sub: { foo: string } } = recurse(1)
const qux2: { foo: string, sub: { foo: string, sub: { foo: string } } } = recurse(2)

Sample

4

I think you can probably get something to work with recursive conditional types, but I would recommend against using such a solution. After all if someone were to invoke recurse(5000) the return type would be huge.

You can easily build a solution based on a mapping type, where you add the type of a child for up to a specific depth:

type Recurse<T extends number =  number> = {
  foo: string;
  sub: RecurseChildren extends Record<T, infer C> ? C : Recurse
}

interface RecurseChildren {
  0: undefined;
  1: Recurse<0>
  2: Recurse<1>
  3: Recurse<2>
  4: Recurse<3>
  5: Recurse<4>
  6: Recurse<5>
  7: Recurse<6>
  8: Recurse<7>
  9: Recurse<8>
  10: Recurse<9>
}


function recurse<T extends number>(depth: T): Recurse<T> {
  if (depth === 0) return { foo: 'hey', sub: undefined as any }
  return {
    foo: 'hey',
    sub: recurse(depth - 1) as any,
  }
}
const qux = recurse(5)

qux.sub.sub.sub.sub.sub.sub // last one is undefined 

Playground Link

2

The other answers are good but they both working with predefined values and you have to provide the range. However you can use another trick to let TypeScript does the checking for you:

type Recurse<N extends number> = Recurse_<N, []>;
type Recurse_<
    N extends number,
    Depth extends unknown[] = unknown[]
> = N extends Depth['length']
    ? { foo: string }
    : { foo: string; sub: Recurse_<N, [N, ...Depth]> };

function recurse<Depth extends number>(depth: Depth): Recurse<Depth> {
    if (depth <= 0) return { foo: 'hey' } as Recurse<Depth>;
    return {
        foo: 'hey',
        sub: recurse(depth - 1),
    } as Recurse<Depth>;
}

const qux = recurse(40);
const qux0: { foo: string } = recurse(0);
const qux1: { foo: string; sub: { foo: string } } = recurse(1);
const qux2: {
    foo: string;
    sub: { foo: string; sub: { foo: string } };
} = recurse(2);

Check the playground

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