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Hello PostgreSQL gurus!

I am looking for some advice about performance of PostgreSQL in relation to importing "large" batches of data.

The whole process is quite simple. I have a BigQuery DB that I download into sqlite3 database. And then after some processing I need to pump the data into PostgreSQL. I am using Python 3.6.9 to pull data from the sqlite3 DB into a dataframe (using read_sql_query) ... that takes seconds - 12s for the largest record set of 3.388.566 records - currently running for 11 hours and still not finished. Then I use Python's multithreading to spawn 8 threads that load 1/8th of the data each in 8192 large chunks.

Based on the research and tests I did with Python vs PostgreSQL imports I am using the method with StringIO that "writes" dataframe.to_csv and then copy_from to feed the PostgreSQL database.

It all worked great until I started using indexes. I was quite aware that this will impact performance of the load but without them the query performance was just terrible, so I need to use them. The data are event data, and thus contain timestamp with tz field, a couple of uuid fields, some varchars and dbl prec fields. Altogether 11 fields, 5 of them indexed (1 timestamp and 4 uuid fields). The average record length is app. 170 bytes. The table has app. 3.4GB of size and 20.3M records. And BTW, the auto vacuum is ON.

The server configuration: DigitalOcean CPU-Optimised Droplet

  • 8 dedicated vCPUs (Intel Xeon Skylake (2.7 GHz, 3.7 GHz turbo)
  • 16 GB RAM
  • 25GB SSD plus 50GB SSD volume (attached but unused
  • OS - Ubuntu 18
  • PostgreSQL Server version - 11.6 (Ubuntu 11.6-1.pgdg18.04+1)

The server runs on 100% CPU utilisation - all 8 CPUs are working hard to get the job done. And they did well, until the DB got a little more filled. See the results below:

Date        Records  Duration Seconds Recs/Sec
01.11.19     53 761  00:00:05       5   10 043
10.11.19     20 314  00:00:06       6    3 233
20.11.19     23 278  00:00:13      14    1 683
30.11.19     12 495  00:00:11      11    1 133
10.12.19     25 771  00:00:20      20    1 286
20.12.19     52 448  00:00:52      52    1 007
30.12.19     29 872  00:00:44      44      674
10.01.20     32 852  00:00:56      57      578
20.01.20     45 569  00:01:26      86      530
21.01.20    558 118  00:02:24     144    3 876
22.01.20  2 472 590  01:11:26   4 286      577
23.01.20  3 873 271  05:11:53  18 713      207
24.01.20  2 126 177  03:44:25  13 465      158
25.01.20  1 486 789  03:35:42  12 942      115
26.01.20  1 367 299  04:04:45  14 685       93
27.01.20  2 648 854  10:20:30  37 230       71
28.01.20  3 276 999  16:17:44  58 664       56

Going from 10K records/second down to 50 records/second makes me thinking that I must have done something wrong! I had gone through many recommendations and pages about importing and adjusted the DB configuration based on that (only the difference from the default):

max_connections = 20
shared_buffers = 2GB
work_mem = 1GB
maintenance_work_mem = 10GB
max_worker_processes = 16
max_parallel_maintenance_workers = 1
max_parallel_workers_per_gather = 1
max_parallel_workers = 16
max_wal_size = 16GB
min_wal_size = 4GB
effective_cache_size = 8GB

I considered to use table partitioning but then I read that it is more relevant for large databases, such as 100GB+. Another thing is that I would partition the data by the timestamp with tz, which (as per my reading) get more complicated. But I would go that way. Just think that 3.5GB of data app. 20M records is not large enough for it.

Can anyone, please, advice on how to manage such imports? Currently the number of records is between 2-4M records per day. But it can dramatically increase very soon and I want to be able to do this data transfer as quickly as possible. The data will not change! So I was tempted to turn off WAL but was disappointed that after crash I would lose all the data.

In ideal situation I would like to be able to achieve at least the initial 10K records/sec on this machine. ;) Any idea how to achieve it?

BTW: It does not have to be Python, sqlite3, dataframe, etc. Just anything that will do!

Thanks a lot in advance, tom.+

PS: Maybe PostgreSQL is not the right DB either.

Update Feb 13, 2020: DROP & re-CREATE INDEXES - The process is required to run repeatedly. It is not a single shot. My idea is to run it at least once per hour. So I cannot drop indexes and re-create them every time. That would be (I suppose) quite inefficient.

To get the CPU utilisation I used top:

top - 21:12:21 up  1:32,  3 users,  load average: 6.31, 2.42, 2.00
Tasks: 169 total,   9 running,  92 sleeping,   0 stopped,   0 zombie
%Cpu(s): 69.6 us, 29.9 sy,  0.0 ni,  0.5 id,  0.0 wa,  0.0 hi,  0.0 si,  0.0 st
KiB Mem : 16424524 total,  6811228 free,  1309644 used,  8303652 buff/cache
KiB Swap:        0 total,        0 free,        0 used. 13289704 avail Mem

  PID USER      PR  NI    VIRT    RES    SHR S  %CPU %MEM     TIME+ COMMAND
 3574 postgres  20   0 2348648 1.448g 1.445g R  99.3  9.2   1:43.13 postgres
 3562 postgres  20   0 2348648 1.418g 1.415g R  99.0  9.1   1:43.18 postgres
 3567 postgres  20   0 2348648 1.448g 1.445g R  99.0  9.2   1:43.09 postgres
 3573 postgres  20   0 2348644 1.448g 1.445g R  99.0  9.2   1:43.15 postgres
 3566 postgres  20   0 2348644 1.447g 1.444g R  98.7  9.2   1:42.54 postgres
 3570 postgres  20   0 2348648 1.448g 1.445g R  98.7  9.2   1:43.04 postgres
 3564 postgres  20   0 2348648 1.448g 1.445g R  98.3  9.2   1:42.96 postgres
 3569 postgres  20   0 2348648 1.448g 1.445g R  98.3  9.2   1:42.36 postgres
 1088 root      20   0 9966.9m 990.8m  30208 S   0.3  6.2   1:56.49 java

The vmstat 1 output is:

procs -----------memory---------- ---swap-- -----io---- -system-- ------cpu-----
 r  b   swpd   free   buff  cache   si   so    bi    bo   in   cs us sy id wa st
 8  0      0 6813372  29668 8272692    0    0   170     4  541 1014 19 20 61  0  0
 8  0      0 6813116  29668 8272716    0    0     0     0 2309 46147 77 23  0  0  0
 8  0      0 6813116  29668 8272732    0    0     0     0 2308 45379 76 24  0  0  0
 8  0      0 6812992  29676 8272764    0    0     0    76 2289 45297 75 25  0  0  0
 8  0      0 6812992  29676 8272840    0    0     0     0 2297 45654 74 26  0  0  0
 8  0      0 6812992  29676 8272864    0    0     0     0 2310 40172 72 28  0  0  0
 8  0      0 6812992  29676 8272872    0    0     0     0 2360 35028 66 34  0  0  0
 8  0      0 6812992  29676 8272880    0    0     0     0 2295 36441 71 29  0  0  0
  • 1
    Try to catch EXPLAIN (ANALYZE, BUFFERS) from one of the slow inserts. Also, if you are using Linux, please show the output of vmstat 1. – Laurenz Albe Feb 12 at 16:33
  • Drop the indices, import the data and then re-create them. – Julia Leder Feb 12 at 19:26
  • "25GB SSD plus 50GB SSD volume (attached but unused" Have you done low level benchmarking to make sure this performs as expected? The numbers you report look like HDD, not SSD, performance. – jjanes Feb 12 at 19:52
  • "The server runs on 100% CPU utilisation" What tool are you using to determine this, and what specific numbers are you seeing from it? – jjanes Feb 12 at 19:57

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