2

Is there a more concise and/or elegant way to express the last line in the let.

(let [a ... ; int
      b ... ; int
      xs ... ; list
      y ... ; int
      z ... ; int
      ]
  (into [a b] cat [xs [y z]]))

The result should be a vector. The expression above looks rather complicated for the simple task it accomplishes. In Python this would be [a, b] + xs + [y,z] which better captures the similarity of the two append operations. A variant that is longer that would capture that similarity is

(into [] cat [[a b] xs [yz]])

My attempts at using concat seems verbose, but perhaps more readable?

(vec (concat [a b] xs [y z]))
6

into/cat would definitely be the most popular approach. If you are dying for concision, you can instead use syntax-quote, the power tool for building lists:

`[~a ~b ~@xs ~y ~z]

It's very expressive and it works, but it will surely be slower: it is designed primarily for use at compile time with small inputs. The overhead is pretty small, though; you can see what code this will expand to by quoting it:

user=> '`[~a ~b ~@xs ~y ~z]
(apply vector 
       (seq (concat (list a)
                    (list b)
                    xs
                    (list y)
                    (list z))))

I've edited the output to make it more readable, by removing the clojure.core/ prefix and adding whitespace, but semantically this is what the REPL printed.

  • Very creative! Didn't think of it despite using macros fairly often. macroexpand-all does show some overhead, as you warned. – chris Feb 12 at 22:12
  • macroexpand-all is irrelevant here. You can just quote it. But there's less overhead than I expected. Almost none, really, just using four separate lists for a/b/x/y instead of the two lists ab/xy. – amalloy Feb 12 at 22:48
  • macroexpand-all gives me fully expanded expression at end of compile which I use to analyze runtime cost, which is all I care about. Is that a mistake? The overhead I was referring to was the new list for each non-seq element. As you mentioned, not too bad. – chris Feb 13 at 17:44
  • 1
    But there's no macro to expand at all. I've edited the answer to show that quoting is all you need to do, to see what happens. – amalloy Feb 13 at 18:04
  • Got it! The expansion is done by the reader. clojure.org/reference/reader#syntax-quote – chris Feb 14 at 1:41
1

Depends on what's in your ...s. Maybe you would prefer to move some of the verbosity to the let? Sometimes complex lines are a sign that the functions providing your inputs could be helped by smaller, intermediary functions. Here, for example, you'd have functions get-ab and get-yz that return [a b] and [y z], respectively.

(let [ab (get-ab) ; list
      xs ... ; list
      yz ... (get-yz)] ; list
  (into [] cat [ab xs yz]))
1

Wow! How many years have passed and I never realized the transducer cat had been added to the language. I thought at first you had some Python-esque pseudo-code there.

A concrete example:

(ns tst.demo.core
  (:use tupelo.core tupelo.test))  ; <= *** many helper functions! ***

(dotest
  (let [a  1 ; int
        b  2 ; int
        xs [:x1 :x2 :x3] ; list
        y  25 ; int
        z  26 ; int
        ]
    (spyx (into [a b] cat [xs [y z]]))))

which prints:

(into [a b] cat [xs [y z]]) => [1 2 :x1 :x2 :x3 25 26]

Re your question, for smallish sizes concat seems a perfectly good answer:

(concat [a b] xs [y z]) => (1 2 :x1 :x2 :x3 25 26)  ; A lazy sequence

although you should be aware of The Ticking Time-Bomb for larger sequences. If you want simplicity and don't need laziness, I have written the glue function in the Tupelo Clojure library:

; Glue together like collections:
(is (= (glue [ 1 2] '(3 4) [ 5 6] )       [ 1 2 3 4 5 6 ]  ))   ; all sequential (vectors & lists)
(is (= (glue {:a 1} {:b 2} {:c 3} )       {:a 1 :c 3 :b 2} ))   ; all maps
(is (= (glue #{1 2} #{3 4} #{6 5} )      #{ 1 2 6 5 3 4 }  ))   ; all sets
(is (= (glue "I" " like " \a " nap!" )   "I like a nap!"   ))   ; all text (strings & chars)

; If you want to convert to a sorted set or map, just put an empty one first:
(is (= (glue (sorted-map) {:a 1} {:b 2} {:c 3})   {:a 1 :b 2 :c 3} ))
(is (= (glue (sorted-set) #{1 2} #{3 4} #{6 5})  #{ 1 2 3 4 5 6  } ))

Another answer is similar to the idea of using syntax-quote, using ->vector and unwrap :

(->vector 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9)             =>  [1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9]
(->vector 1 (unwrap [2 3 4 5 6 7 8]) 9)  =>  [1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9]

It will also work recursively for nested unwrap calls:

(->vector 1 (unwrap [2 3 (unwrap [4 5 6]) 7 8]) 9)  =>  [1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9]

If the scalar values are only at the beginning or end, I would suggest using prepend and append:

(append [1 2] 3  )   ;=> [1 2 3  ]
(append [1 2] 3 4)   ;=> [1 2 3 4]

(prepend   3 [2 1])  ;=> [  3 2 1]
(prepend 4 3 [2 1])  ;=> [4 3 2 1]

Of course, if you don't need to retain any nested structure in the 5 things you are combining, perhaps the Big Sledgehammer (tm) is the easiest:

(flatten [[a b] xs [y z]]) => (1 2 :x1 :x2 :x3 25 26)

As always, don't forget to study the Clojure CheatSheet!

  • Would it be possible to clarify that ->vector, append, and prepend are from Tupelo, while flatten is standard? Kudos on your open source contributions to the community! – chris Feb 14 at 1:52
  • Added some links. – Alan Thompson Feb 14 at 3:10

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