1

I need to check if N values are equals.

var
  A, B, C, D : Integer;
begin
  ...
  if(A = B) and (B = C) and (C = D) then
    ShowMessage('Same value');
end;

Is there a shorter way to compare N values? I mean something like:

var
  A, B, C, D : Integer;
begin
  ...
  if SameValue([A, B, C, D]) then
    ShowMessage('Same value');
end;
  • Not much shorter than you already have. You can put the values into an array, and then loop through that until you find a difference – Remy Lebeau Feb 13 at 16:10
4

Well, the best you can achieve is basically your own suggestion.

You would implement this using an open array parameter:

function AllEqual(const AValues: array of Integer): Boolean;
var
  i: Integer;
begin
  for i := 1 to High(AValues) do
    if AValues[i] <> AValues[0] then
      Exit(False);
  Result := True;
end;

The correctness of this implementation is obvious:

  • If the number of values in the array is 0 or 1, it returns True.
  • Otherwise, and in general, it returns False iff the array contains two non-equal values.
  • AValues[0] is only accessed if High(AValues) >= 1, in which case the 0th value exists.

A function like this one is straightforward to implement for ordinal types. For real types (floating-point values), it becomes much more subtle, at least if you want to compare the elements with epsilons (like the SameValue function does in the Delphi RTL). Indeed, then you get different behaviour depending on if you compare every element against the first element, or if you compare every element against its predecessor.

  • Please note that I intentionally use British English, and that "iff" means more than "if". Also, I do believe that "straightforward" is the standard spelling of the word, at least according to the sources I have access to right now. – Andreas Rejbrand Feb 13 at 18:27
1

Andreas' answer is correct, I'd like to add a different approach though:

uses Math;

function AllEqual(const AValues: array of Integer): Boolean;
begin
  Result := (MinIntValue(AValues) = MaxIntValue(AValues));
end;

function AllEqualF(const AValues: array of Double; Epsilon: Double): Boolean;
begin
  Result := ((MaxValue(AValues)- MinValue(AValues)) <= Epsilon);
end;
  • 1
    Your integer version behaves exactly as mine, except it is slower and fails if the argument array is empty, so in practice I'd not use that one. However, the float version is a very nice way to handle this problem with an epsilon; it is based on a very natural definition of "all float values are equal (with epsilon)". And for pedagogical reasons, it totally makes sense to introduce the int version before this nice float version. So +1 from me! – Andreas Rejbrand Feb 13 at 22:03
  • Well, of course the float version can be optimized: you can find the min and the max in a single loop. That's likely somewhat faster. Also, you could start the AllEqualF function by handling the empty argument array case (and return True). – Andreas Rejbrand Feb 13 at 22:10
  • AllEqualF([], 0.0) returns True on Delphi XE, integer version likewise, I guess the implementation has changed at one point. Both functions can definitely be optimized, the question gave me the impression that there won't be too many array values, so I went for the shorter code. – Guest Feb 14 at 8:54
  • If you Ctrl-click MaxValue in your IDE, doesn't the first line read Result := Data[Low(Data)];? If so, you must not call this function with an empty array. If you get the right result, that's only luck. Try ShowMessage(MinIntValue([]).ToString); a few times. Also try it after enabling range checking in the compiler options. – Andreas Rejbrand Feb 14 at 12:12
  • Interestingly both ShowMessage(MinIntValue([]).ToString); and ShowMessage(MaxIntValue([]).ToString); give random values which are equal to each other, even with range checking enabled. Either way, yes, empty array shouldn't be used with these functions to be on the safe side, thanks for pointing it out, I hadn't checked the MaxValue function's source code. – Guest Feb 14 at 12:53
0

There is quite simple and very fast equality comparison approach for ints without a need of additional method and stuff like this - it's Bitwise Operators And of course, this could be put in a method with open array or so.

There are even 2 options (or maybe more), with second you also can replace "or" to "+" , OR (not both, it will ruin equality-test logic) you can replace "xor" to "-" (last case)

BUT the resulting condition length is not shorter than original (only the last case is same and all brackets/parenthesis are vital, except first xor/-), here is the testing code:

program Project1;{$APPTYPE CONSOLE}
uses Math; var a, b, c, d, x : Integer; s: string;
begin
  Randomize;
  repeat
    x := Random(10) - 5;
    a := x + Sign(Random() - 0.5);
    b := x + Sign(Random() - 0.5);
    c := x + Sign(Random() - 0.5);
    d := x + Sign(Random() - 0.5);
    Writeln(a, ' ', b, ' ', c, ' ', d);
    Writeln((A = B) and (B = C) and (C = D));
    Writeln(a or b or c or d = a and b and c and d);
    Writeln(a xor b or (b xor c) or (c xor d) = 0);
    Writeln(a - b or (b - c) or (c - d) = 0);
    Readln(s);
  until s <> '';
end.

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