20

I'm about to write a function which, would return me a shortest period of group of letters which would eventually create the given word.

For example word abkebabkebabkeb is created by repeated abkeb word. I would like to know, how efficiently analyze input word, to get the shortest period of characters creating input word.

1
  • @Tony The Tiger, the result (shortest period) does not have to be a real word.
    – jack44
    May 16 '11 at 18:03

13 Answers 13

16

Here is a correct O(n) algorithm. The first for loop is the table building portion of KMP. There are various proofs that it always runs in linear time.

Since this question has 4 previous answers, none of which are O(n) and correct, I heavily tested this solution for both correctness and runtime.

def pattern(inputv):
    if not inputv:
        return inputv

    nxt = [0]*len(inputv)
    for i in range(1, len(nxt)):
        k = nxt[i - 1]
        while True:
            if inputv[i] == inputv[k]:
                nxt[i] = k + 1
                break
            elif k == 0:
                nxt[i] = 0
                break
            else:
                k = nxt[k - 1]

    smallPieceLen = len(inputv) - nxt[-1]
    if len(inputv) % smallPieceLen != 0:
        return inputv

    return inputv[0:smallPieceLen]
14
  • 1
    So is this a solution you have come up with or is this a known algorithm? Nov 25 '15 at 23:53
  • 4
    Well KMP is a known algorithm. This question was very similar to a homework problem I had, and this is the answer I came up with for the homework. The instructor's solution was a bit different, but also used KMP.
    – Buge
    Nov 27 '15 at 7:24
  • Hi Buge, love your solution, and vote up. but confused by this line smallPieceLen = len(inputv) - nxt[-1], and nxt[-1] means if the whole string does not match, what index we will be used to compare next. smallPieceLen represents the differences total length of string and nxt[-1], how it could be represented as shortest repetitive string?
    – Lin Ma
    Oct 27 '16 at 22:38
  • 2
    @LinMa: (Buge wasn't active lately) nxt[-1] means if the whole string does not match, what index we will be used to compare next no (contorted grammar, btw.). It is the index to compare next when all of the pattern matched and you want to find its next occurrence in a longer text. nxt[i] = p means pattern[i+1-p:i+1] equals pattern[0:p] (& != for p+1). nxt[-1] is the index to compare next if the "first" mismatch was "at len+1". (In many a presentation/implementation of KMP, there is a special value of -1 at index 0, with the n values as above "shifted to an index higher by one".)
    – greybeard
    Oct 28 '16 at 9:37
  • 1
    @LinMa: (both are notified, anyway) Let me call len(inputv) len and nxt[-1] matchLen. If matchLen < smallPieceLen, the only chance for smallPieceLen to divide len is to be equal to it. If smallPieceLenmatchLen, inputv[0:smallPieceLen] equals inputv[smallPieceLen:2*smallPieceLen], and k never got reset (again): inputv is made up of repetitions of inputv[0:smallPieceLen] - the divisibility check just ensures that it ends with a full repetition.
    – greybeard
    Oct 31 '16 at 8:37
2

This is an example for PHP:

<?php
function getrepeatedstring($string) {
    if (strlen($string)<2) return $string;
    for($i = 1; $i<strlen($string); $i++) {
        if (substr(str_repeat(substr($string, 0, $i),strlen($string)/$i+1), 0, strlen($string))==$string)
            return substr($string, 0, $i);
    }
    return $string;
}
?>
7
  • This returns 'abkeb' which should be correct but I'm not sure in what way the OP is asking for 'kebab' rather than 'abkeb'.
    – pimvdb
    May 16 '11 at 18:12
  • This is what I'm looking for. But it runs in O(n). Any ideas if this can be speeded up?
    – jack44
    May 16 '11 at 18:18
  • 1
    @jack44: You can't know if you have the shortest cycle until you've examined the entire string. Unless you have other knowledge, like what the largest possible cycle might be. It might be that the last character in the string throws the whole cycle off, you don't know.
    – mellamokb
    May 16 '11 at 18:27
  • 3
    I don't know PHP, but this looks like it's O(n^2).
    – dfb
    May 16 '11 at 18:29
  • @Richard86 - String comparison is going to O(n), though, isn't it?
    – dfb
    May 16 '11 at 21:04
1

O(n) solution. Assumes that the entire string must be covered. The key observation is that we generate the pattern and test it, but if we find something along the way that doesn't match, we must include the entire string that we already tested, so we don't have to reobserve those characters.

def pattern(inputv):
    pattern_end =0
    for j in range(pattern_end+1,len(inputv)):

        pattern_dex = j%(pattern_end+1)
        if(inputv[pattern_dex] != inputv[j]):

            pattern_end = j;
            continue

        if(j == len(inputv)-1):
            print pattern_end
            return inputv[0:pattern_end+1];
    return inputv;
6
  • Is for pattern_end in range(len(inputv)/2) necessary? I don't think it is.
    – Ishtar
    May 16 '11 at 18:55
  • @Ishtar - sorry I'm not following. Do you mean the look of the len()/2 part
    – dfb
    May 16 '11 at 18:56
  • I mean, replacing that line with pattern_end = 0.
    – Ishtar
    May 16 '11 at 18:59
  • 9
    I'm afraid the algorithm is incorrect. Please consider the input: "BCBDBCBCBDBC". The smallest repeating pattern is "BCBDBC", but the algorithm above will miss it. Also, I think it doesn't deal correctly with the case "HELLOHELL" (where it returns "HELLO" instead of the complete string). Feb 3 '13 at 11:03
  • @EyalSchneider returning "HELLO" for "HELLOHELL" makes perfect sense. Otherwise you could be using the length of the string to determine which patterns are even allowed. You only need to check patterns whose lengths are combinations of the prime factors (and 1) of the length of the input. For example if you get a string that's 101 characters long what's the point of even trying a 5 letter subsequence? It's not going to fit perfectly into 101 characters. If your input's length is 13 there's no point in even checking, no pattern (except a 1 letter pattern) repeated n times can ever add up to 13.
    – Boris
    Feb 10 '19 at 0:06
0

I believe there is a very elegant recursive solution. Many of the proposed solutions solve the extra complexity where the string ends with part of the pattern, like abcabca. But I do not think that is asked for.

My solution for the simple version of the problem in clojure:

 (defn find-shortest-repeating [pattern string]
  (if (empty? (str/replace string pattern ""))
   pattern
   (find-shortest-repeating (str pattern (nth string (count pattern))) string)))

(find-shortest-repeating "" "abcabcabc") ;; "abc"

But be aware that this will not find patterns that are uncomplete at the end.

0

I found a solution based on your post, that could take an incomplete pattern:

(defn find-shortest-repeating [pattern string]
   (if (or (empty? (clojure.string/split string (re-pattern pattern)))
          (empty? (second (clojure.string/split string (re-pattern pattern)))))
    pattern
    (find-shortest-repeating (str pattern (nth string (count pattern))) string)))
1
  • @ward (defn find-pattern-string [string] (let [pattern "" working-str string] (reduce #(if (not (or (empty? (clojure.string/split string (re-pattern %1))) (empty? (second (clojure.string/split string (re-pattern %1)))))) (str %1 %2) %1) pattern working-str))) Oct 12 '17 at 14:53
0

My Solution: The idea is to find a substring from the position zero such that it becomes equal to the adjacent substring of same length, when such a substring is found return the substring. Please note if no repeating substring is found I am printing the entire input String.

public static void repeatingSubstring(String input){
    for(int i=0;i<input.length();i++){
        if(i==input.length()-1){
            System.out.println("There is no repetition "+input);
        }
        else if(input.length()%(i+1)==0){
            int size = i+1;
            if(input.substring(0, i+1).equals(input.substring(i+1, i+1+size))){
                System.out.println("The subString which repeats itself is "+input.substring(0, i+1));
                break;
            }
        }
    }
}
1
  • I think this would fail for the string "ababcababc"
    – J.R.
    Jul 23 '20 at 0:46
0

Regex solution:

Step 1: Separate each character with a delimiter character that isn't part of the input-string, including a trailing one (i.e. ~):

(.)
$1~

Example input: "abkebabkebabkeb"
Example output: "a~b~k~e~b~a~b~k~e~b~a~b~k~e~b~"

Try it online in Retina. (NOTE: Retina is a Regex-based programming language designed for quick testing of regexes and being able to compete successfully in code-golf challenges.)

Step 2: Use the following regex to find the shortest repeating substring (where ~ is our chosen delimiter character):

^(([^~]+~)*?)\1*$
$1

Explanation:

^(([^~]+~)*?)\1*$
^               $    # Start and end, to match the entire input-string
  ([^~]+~)           # Capture group 1: One or more non-'~' followed by a '~'
 (        *?)        # Capture group 2: Repeated zero or more time optionally
             \1*     # Followed by the first capture group repeated zero or more times

$1                   # Replace the entire input-string with the first capture group match

Example input: "a~b~k~e~b~a~b~k~e~b~a~b~k~e~b~"
Example output: "a~b~k~e~b~"

Try it online in Retina.

Step 3: Remove our delimiter character again, to get our intended result.

~
<empty>

Example input: "a~b~k~e~b~"
Example output: "abkeb"

Try it online in Retina.

Here an example implementation in Java.

0

This is a solution I came up with using the queue, it passed all the test cases of a similar problem in codeforces. Problem No is 745A.

#include<bits/stdc++.h>
using namespace std;
typedef long long ll;

int main()
{
    ios_base::sync_with_stdio(false);
    cin.tie(NULL);

    string s, s1, s2; cin >> s; queue<char> qu; qu.push(s[0]); bool flag = true; int ind = -1;
    s1 = s.substr(0, s.size() / 2);
    s2 = s.substr(s.size() / 2);
    if(s1 == s2)
    {
        for(int i=0; i<s1.size(); i++)
        {
            s += s1[i];
        }
    }
    //cout << s1 << " " << s2 << " " << s << "\n";
    for(int i=1; i<s.size(); i++)
    {
        if(qu.front() == s[i]) {qu.pop();}
        qu.push(s[i]);
    }
    int cycle = qu.size();

    /*queue<char> qu2 = qu; string str = "";
    while(!qu2.empty())
    {
        cout << qu2.front() << " ";
        str += qu2.front();
        qu2.pop();
    }*/


    while(!qu.empty())
    {
        if(s[++ind] != qu.front()) {flag = false; break;}
        qu.pop();
    }
    flag == true ? cout << cycle : cout << s.size();
    return 0;
}

0

Most easiest one in python:

def pattern(self, s):
    ans=(s+s).find(s,1,-1)
    return len(pat) if ans == -1 else ans
1
  • It will be helpful if you explain what you did Aug 27 '20 at 7:10
0

Simpler answer which I can come up in an interview is just a O(n^2) solution, which tries out all combinations of substring starting from 0.

int findSmallestUnit(string str){
    for(int i=1;i<str.length();i++){
        int j=0;
        for(;j<str.length();j++){
            if(str[j%i] != str[j]){
                break;
            }
        }
        if(j==str.length()) return str.substr(0,i);
    }
    return str;
}

Now if someone is interested in O(n) solution to this problem in c++:

  int findSmallestUnit(string str){
      vector<int> lps(str.length(),0);
      int i=1;
      int len=0;

      while(i<str.length()){
          if(str[i] == str[len]){
              len++;
              lps[i] = len;
              i++;
          }
          else{
              if(len == 0) i++;
              else{
                  len = lps[len-1];
              }
          }
      }
      int n=str.length();
      int x = lps[n-1];
      if(n%(n-x) == 0){
          return str.substr(0,n-x);    
      }
      return str;
  }

The above is just @Buge's answer in c++, since someone asked in comments.

-1

Super delayed answer, but I got the question in an interview, here was my answer (probably not the most optimal but it works for strange test cases as well).

private void run(String[] args) throws IOException {
    File file = new File(args[0]);
    BufferedReader buffer = new BufferedReader(new FileReader(file));
    String line;
    while ((line = buffer.readLine()) != null) {
        ArrayList<String> subs = new ArrayList<>();
        String t = line.trim();
        String out = null;
        for (int i = 0; i < t.length(); i++) {
            if (t.substring(0, t.length() - (i + 1)).equals(t.substring(i + 1, t.length()))) {
                subs.add(t.substring(0, t.length() - (i + 1)));
            }
        }
        subs.add(0, t);
        for (int j = subs.size() - 2; j >= 0; j--) {
            String match = subs.get(j);
            int mLength = match.length();
            if (j != 0 && mLength <= t.length() / 2) {
                if (t.substring(mLength, mLength * 2).equals(match)) {
                    out = match;
                    break;
                }
            } else {
                out = match;
            }
        }
        System.out.println(out);
    }
}

Testcases:

abcabcabcabc
bcbcbcbcbcbcbcbcbcbcbcbcbcbc
dddddddddddddddddddd
adcdefg
bcbdbcbcbdbc
hellohell

Code returns:

abc
bc
d
adcdefg
bcbdbc
hellohell

1
  • 1
    Just looking at the first for loop this is O(n^2), because each .equals() can take n time.
    – Buge
    Nov 22 '15 at 19:58
-1

Works in cases such as bcbdbcbcbdbc.

function smallestRepeatingString(sequence){
  var currentRepeat = '';
  var currentRepeatPos = 0;

  for(var i=0, ii=sequence.length; i<ii; i++){
    if(currentRepeat[currentRepeatPos] !== sequence[i]){
      currentRepeatPos = 0;
      // Add next character available to the repeat and reset i so we don't miss any matches inbetween
      currentRepeat = currentRepeat + sequence.slice(currentRepeat.length, currentRepeat.length+1);
      i = currentRepeat.length-1;
    }else{
      currentRepeatPos++;
    }
    if(currentRepeatPos === currentRepeat.length){
      currentRepeatPos = 0;
    }
  }

  // If repeat wasn't reset then we didn't find a full repeat at the end.
  if(currentRepeatPos !== 0){ return sequence; }

  return currentRepeat;
}
1
  • 1
    This is actually O(n^2). That is because you reset i to be smaller with i = currentRepeat.length-1;. So with a 10 character string ling 'aaaaaaaaab' it takes 46 iterations. With a 20 character string it takes 191 iterations.
    – Buge
    Nov 22 '15 at 20:22
-1

I came up with a simple solution that works flawlessly even with very large strings.
PHP Implementation:

function get_srs($s){
    $hash = md5( $s );
    $i = 0; $p = '';

    do {
        $p .= $s[$i++];
        preg_match_all( "/{$p}/", $s, $m );
    } while ( ! hash_equals( $hash, md5( implode( '', $m[0] ) ) ) );

    return $p;
}
1
  • 1
    Would be good if you gave some detail regarding why exactly this works. Providing more detail helps the entire community and helps to get more up votes. Sep 15 '16 at 20:48

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