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I am looking for a way to improve the performance of a transaction. My code looks like the following:

return db.Transaction(func(tx *gorm.DB) error {
        for _, val := range values {
            if err := tx.Save(&val).Error; err != nil {
                fmt.Println(err)
            }
        }

        return nil
}

(this is stripping away some logic code) This seems to be able to do about 10 Saves per second, which seems quite slow especially when dealing with larger data sets. I'm looking to replace this with something along the line of the following:

return db.Transaction(func(tx *gorm.DB) error {
    addToDb := func(txdb *gorm.DB, job <- chan Values) {
        for val := range job {
            if err := txdb.Save(val).Error; err != nil {
                fmt.Println(err)
            }
        }
    }

    jobs := make(chan Values, len(values))

    for w := 1; w <= 10; w++ {
        go addToDb(tx, jobs)
    }

    for _, v := range values {
        jobs <- v
    }

    close(jobs)
    return nil
}

I end up with sql: transaction has already been committed or rolled back

Is there a proper way of dealing with multi-threaded transaction inserts?

  • 1
    "Is there a proper way of dealing with multi-threaded transaction inserts?" -- Generally: Don't. Why? Because it won't help anything. The slowness is in the database, not in the client code, so optimizing the client code will add complexity without any gain. – Flimzy Feb 13 at 21:04
  • I see. Would this still be the case if not done through a transaction and instead through multiple connections? It seems rather slow for a database to only be able to insert or update 1 line every ~100ms. Or is there perhaps another approach? – Chris Feb 13 at 21:30
  • Depending on the DB engine you're using, if you're not in a transaction, there's a lot more opportunity to do the DB operations in "parallel". – Flimzy Feb 13 at 21:31
  • 1
    Within a transaction, the main benefit (at least on most DB engines) is probably that you don't have to wait for the network round-trip. But that's a tiny part of the delay in most cases. – Flimzy Feb 13 at 21:32
  • Working with postgres. I'll give updating without a transaction a go, since my data I'm working with doesn't require the data integrity guarantee. Thank you so much! – Chris Feb 13 at 22:22

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