2

I just started learning Reason(OCaml) and I don't understand the titled thing. Why the second part returns function but not calculated value? I thought that only a way of passing argument differs and a result doesn't.

let addWithoutLabel = (~x=10) => (y) => x + y;
let fifteen = addWithoutLabel(5);
Js.log(fifteen)
/* 15 */

let addWithLabel = (~x=10) => (~y) => x + y;
let sixteen = addWithLabel(~y=6);
Js.log(sixteen)
/* 
function sixteen(param) {
  return addWithLabel(param, 6);
}
*/

https://reasonml.github.io/en/try.html?rrjsx=true&reason=DYUwLgBAhgJjDqBLMALA9gVzAGSgIxGAgF4IAKAPwA9iBGABgEoSA+cgT2eLaogGoI7ANwAoUJABmiCWBAgAdiWhwkqTDnyEyAVkaiAUgGcAdMDQBzMlJlz5jEQHoAVBFraIThyLHhlCZCi4BESklDQMXGyUnKwQvALCPpCGiFSyCkqw-qhBWhTsxABseiJGphZkKWm29s4QIhIY8gDGYIhoilXp8mQADlAATlAAtswA3iIQEAPgGAOKWaqBmsB9gyMANBDFogC+Ip5AA

  • 1
    I don't know Reason syntax and I don't want to post examples in OCaml syntax. The prerequisite for you here is to understand partial application. Then the answer to the question is: it's because labeled arguments can be passed in any order. The solution is to always define functions with at least one non-labeled argument, possibly () if all other arguments are labeled. Don't write let f ?x y = ... but write let f ?x ~y () = ... or let f ?x y = .... – Martin Jambon Feb 13 at 21:28
  • 3
    @MartinJambon You can easily convert between the two syntaxes with Reason Try: reasonml.github.io/en/try – BackfromHell Feb 13 at 21:41
  • 1
    @MartinJambon your 'don't write' code and the second 'write' code look the same to me... – Yawar Feb 14 at 14:41
  • @Yawar thanks for the catch. It's let f ?x ~y = ... that should not be used. – Martin Jambon Feb 14 at 19:28
  • @MartinJambon So it means function is invoked when all of the non-labeled argument has satisfied? – Takuya HARA Feb 16 at 6:23
3

It is required to have at least one positional parameter when there are optional labeled arguments (or as in your case, arguments with a default parameter). Otherwise Reason expects from you that you want to use the partially applied function.

To ensure the full application, use a unit () in both the function declaration and function invocation to tell the compiler that you want to omit the ~x parameter.

let addWithoutLabel = (~x=10) => (y) => x + y;
let fifteen = addWithoutLabel(5);
Js.log(fifteen)
/* 15 */

let addWithLabel = (~x=10) => (~y, ()) => x + y;
let sixteen = addWithLabel(~y=6, ());
Js.log(sixteen)
/* 16 */

https://reasonml.github.io/en/try.html?rrjsx=true&reason=DYUwLgBAhgJjDqBLMALA9gVzAGSgIxGAgF4IAKAPwA9iBGABgBoIBPAShID4IqIBqVgG4AUKEgAzROLAgQAOxLQ4SVJhz5CZAKxsRAKQDOAOmBoA5mUnTZc3cID0AKgi0tER-eGjwShMhS4BESklDQMHMTclCzMZGwR3LwCLCJiEAaIVDLyirB+qIGaFCzEAGyx8frGphYZWTZ2Ti6l7p5AA

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