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So, I kind of already solved the problem I'm having. It has to do with whether or not I use encoding on my C# client's StreamWriter, but I want to know how to handle these extra 3 bytes regardless.

This is a client written in C# and a server written in Go. Why C#? It will have Unity applications later for cloud stuff. Why Go? I just wanted to use it. Also my server box is Linux and Go is easy to x-compile.

The problem was that the data being sent from my C# client was having 3 extra bytes appended to the front which conflicted with Go's Json.Unmarshal function feeding it in directly once this data arrived at the server.

This is the JSON formatted string leaving the C# client
{"channel":0, "data": {"name":"Hasty Wombat","uuid":"e91ccc23-7e80-4189-958e-9b778dce1146","type":"Drone"}}\n

This is the byte array before going through the stream writer configured with UTF8 in the C# client.
_sWriter = new StreamWriter(_tStream, System.Text.Encoding.UTF8, 8192);
Length: 108

123 34 99 104 97 110 110 101 108 34 58 48 44 32 34 100 97 116 97 34 58 32 123 34 110 97 109 101 34 58 34 72 97 115 116 121 32 87 111 109 98 97 116 34 44 34 117 117 105 100 34 58 34 101 57 49 99 99 99 50 51 45 55 101 56 48 45 52 49 56 57 45 57 53 56 101 45 57 98 55 55 56 100 99 101 49 49 52 54 34 44 34 116 121 112 101 34 58 34 68 114 111 110 101 34 125 125 10

And when it arrives at my Go server, it looks like this:
Length: 111

[239 187 191 123 34 99 104 97 110 110 101 108 34 58 48 44 32 34 100 97 116 97 34 58 32 123 34 110 97 109 101 34 58 34 72 97 115 116 121 32 87 111 109 98 97 116 34 44 34 117 117 105 100 34 58 34 50 99 57 49 48 97 99 98 45 53 101 101 102 45 52 98 56 101 45 56 52 50 54 45 54 49 102 100 100 99 99 51 101 51 55 100 34 44 34 116 121 112 101 34 58 34 68 114 111 110 101 34 125 125 10]

From my quick research, those 3 extra bytes being added at the front have something to do with the byte order regarding UTF8. That's fine, but it's interfering with my ability to unmarshal this JSON byte array into a map.

func handleRequest (conn net.Conn) {

  for {
    data, err := bufio.NewReader(conn).ReadBytes('\n');
    if err != nil {
      fmt.Println("Client disconnect")
      conn.Close()
      return
    }

    var mappedData map[string]interface{}
    err = json.Unmarshal(data, &mappedData)
    if err != nil {
      fmt.Println("err:", err)
      continue
    }

  // ...
  }
}

err: invalid character 'ï' looking for beginning of value

The Json.Unmarshal function in Go doesn't like that byte array. At first my workaround was to just slice off the first 3 bytes. But, that causes problems when I started added Go clients whose TCP output isn't adding those 3 bytes.

The obvious workaround is to just not use UTF8 in my StreamWriter on the C# client.

// NetworkManager.cs

_tcpconn = new TCPConnection(_ipAddress, _port, OnConnectionFailure);

if (_tcpconn.SetupSocket()) {

var data = "{\"channel\":0, \"data\": {" +
  "\"name\":" + "\"" + _clientName + "\"," +
  "\"uuid\":" + "\"" + _uuid + "\"," +
  "\"type\":" + "\"Drone\"" +
"}}" + "\n";

_tcpconn.WriteSocket(data);

// TCPConnection.cs

public bool SetupSocket () {
  try {
    _socket = new TcpClient(_conHost, _conPort);

    _tStream = _socket.GetStream();
    // _sWriter = new StreamWriter(_tStream, System.Text.Encoding.UTF8, 8192);
    _sWriter = new StreamWriter(_tStream); // Fixed my problem
    _sReader = new StreamReader(_tStream);
  }
  catch (Exception e) {
    throw new Exception("Socket error:" + e.Message);
    return false;
  }
  _socketReady = true;
  return true;
}

public void WriteSocket (string theLine) {
  if (!_socketReady)
  return;

  try {
    _sWriter.Write(theLine);
    _sWriter.Flush();
  }
  catch {
    _socketReady = false;
    _onConnectionFailure();
  }
}

Now I want to know if Go has something that properly decodes a UTF8 byte array or something that correctly detects those extra bytes (or any extra encoding bytes really), and give me the raw JSON the Json.Unmarshal function wants. I'm trying to have my Stream Writer setup to be versatile, but I'm not sure yet if I'll ever need something encoded UTF8 or what the advantages are.

4

UTF-8 has a well-defined byte order. There's no such thing as big-endian UTF-8 vs little-endian UTF-8; there is only UTF-8. This means that a byte order marker or BOM in UTF-8 is pointless. Some software thinks it's pointful: that it marks a data file as being stored in UTF-8 (vs UTF-16-LE or UTF-16-BE, each of which would start with the two bytes 0xFF and 0xFE but in either order, if that UTF-16-xx file has a BOM). As long as you agree that such software is wrong, don't use it, or use it in a way that defeats this initial BOM.

As Jim B noted, systems that generate JSON text must not embed a UTF-8-ized BOM (which comes out as the three bytes 0xEF, 0xBB, 0xBF) at the front of its output. However, it may accept and ignore a BOM at the start of a stream. To do that in Go, inspect the incoming stream data and remove an initial BOM if present, passing the rest of the data on as the JSON bytes. But you're probably better off making your C# code generate allowed output, rather than fancying up your Go code to allow forbidden input.

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